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  • 1.
    Bodin, Hristina
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Ehde, Per Magnus
    Halmstad University.
    Weisner, Stefan
    Halmstad University.
    Attenuation of pharmaceutical substances: phytoremediation using constructed wetlands2018In: 13th Society of wetland scientists (SWS) Europe chapter meeting: management of wetland ecosystem services: issues, challenges and solutions, 2018, p. 19-22Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Currently, wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) do not efficiently remove pharmaceutical substances (PS). Thus, such substances are now frequently found in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Also, concentrations of some PS in treated effluents exceed Environmental Quality Standards proposed by EU legislation. One resource-efficient option for increasing PS removal in WWTP effluents is to use constructed wetlands (CWs) as an attenuation step (Breitholtz et al. 2012; Li et al. 2014). However, very little research has been done on how to maximize the PS attenuation capacity of CWs. Therefore, a project with the aim to investigate reduction of different pharmaceutical substances in CWs with different vegetation compositions and water depths, was performed at the Experimental Wetland Area (EVA) located 20 km north of Halmstad, Sweden. 

  • 2.
    Brink, Ebba
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Wamsler, Christine
    Lund University.
    Adolfsson, Maria
    Trelleborg Municipal.
    Axelsson, Monica
    Kristianstad Municipal.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Bjorn, Helena
    Lomma Municipal.
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Lund University.
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö University.
    Jephson, Therese
    SALA.
    Narvelo, Widar
    Helsingborg Municipal.
    Ness, Barry
    lund University.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Palo, Thomas
    SLU Umeå.
    Sjeldrup, Magnus
    Bjuv Municipal.
    Stalhammar, Sanna
    Lund University.
    Thiere, Geraldine
    Lomma Municipal.
    On the road to 'research municipalities': analysing transdisciplinarity in municipal ecosystem services and adaptation planning2018In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 765-784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transdisciplinary research and collaboration is widely acknowledged as a critical success factor for solution-oriented approaches that can tackle complex sustainability challenges, such as biodiversity loss, pollution, and climate-related hazards. In this context, city governments' engagement in transdisciplinarity is generally seen as a key condition for societal transformation towards sustainability. However, empirical evidence is rare. This paper presents a self-assessment of a joint research project on ecosystem services and climate adaptation planning (ECOSIMP) undertaken by four universities and seven Swedish municipalities. We apply a set of design principles and guiding questions for transdisciplinary sustainability projects and, on this basis, identify key aspects for supporting university-municipality collaboration. We show that: (1) selecting the number and type of project stakeholders requires more explicit consideration of the purpose of societal actors' participation; (2) concrete, interim benefits for participating practitioners and organisations need to be continuously discussed; (3) promoting the 'inter', i.e., interdisciplinary and inter-city learning, can support transdisciplinarity and, ultimately, urban sustainability and long-term change. In this context, we found that design principles for transdisciplinarity have the potential to (4) mitigate project shortcomings, even when transdisciplinarity is not an explicit aim, and (5) address differences and allow new voices to be heard. We propose additional guiding questions to address shortcomings and inspire reflexivity in transdisciplinary projects.

  • 3.
    Czarnezki, Jason J.
    et al.
    USA.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Kuh, Katrina
    USA.
    Crafting next generation eco-label policy2018In: Environmental Law, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 409-452Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Eco-labels present a promising policy tool in the effort to achieve sustainable consumption. Many questions remain, however, about the extent to which eco-labels can contribute to sustainability efforts and how to maximize their effectiveness. This Article deploys research from evolutionary psychology, behavioral law and economics, and norm theory to offer specific insights for the design and implementation of eco-labels to enhance their influence on sustainable consumer choice. Notably, this research suggests possibilities for ecolabels to shape or expand consumer preferences for green goods, and thereby enhance eco-label influence on consumer behavior by extending it beyond eco-minded consumers. We suggest that public exposure of the label (so that people see it) and the exposure of the purchasing behavior (so that other people can see that you have bought the product) are key elements to the success of eco-labels—the social context around product purchasing may be as important as the ecolabel itself. We recommend that behavioral insights be used to improve eco-labeling as traditionally understood by incorporating knowledge about behavioral tendencies into label design so as to allow for more accurate matching of consumers’ preexisting environmental preferences to eco-labeled goods, and develop next-generation ecolabeling policy with the potential to significantly expand the market for eco-labeled goods. Specifically, 1) Eco-labels could be purposefully designed and implemented to attract consumers motivated by social norms; 2) Eco-labels could appeal to a wider range of abstract norm alternate more broadly or locally accepted and strong abstract that are stronger and/or more broadly accepted or locally-salient; and 3) Ecolabels could highlight private, near and near-term benefits.

  • 4.
    Czernekova, Michaela
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. Charles University, Prague.
    Janelt, Kamil
    Poland.
    Student, Sebastian
    Poland.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Poprawa, Izabela
    Poland.
    A comparative ultrastructure study of storage cells in the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer in the hydrated state and after desiccation and heating stress2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tardigrades represent an invertebrate phylum with no circulatory or respiratory system.Their body cavity is filled with free storage cells of the coelomocyte-type, which are responsible for important physiological functions. We report a study comparing the ultrastructure of storage cells in anhydrobiotic and hydrated specimens of the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer. We also analysed the effect of temperature stress on storage cell structure. Firstly, we verified two types of ultrastructurally different storage cells, which differ in cellular organelle complexity, amount and content of reserve material and connection to oogenetic stage. Type I cells were found to differ ultrastructurally depending on the oogenetic stage of the animal. The main function of these cells is energy storage. Storage cells of Type I were also observed in the single male that was found among the analysed specimens. The second cell type, Type II, found only in females, represents young undifferentiated cells, possibly stem cells. The two types of cells also differ with respect to the presence of nucleolar vacuoles,which are related to oogenetic stages and to changes in nucleolic activity during oogenesis. Secondly, this study revealed that storage cells are not ultrastructurally affected by six months of desiccation or by heating following this desiccation period. However, heating of the desiccated animals (tuns) tended to reduce animal survival, indicating that longterm desiccation makes these animals more vulnerable to heat stress. We confirmed the degradative pathways during the rehydration process after desiccation and heat stress. Our study is the first to document two ultrastructurally different types of storage cells in tardigrades and reveals new perspectives for further studies of tardigrade storage cells.

  • 5.
    Czernekova, Michaela
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. Czech republic.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Hajer, Jaromir
    Czech republic.
    Devetter, Miroslav
    Czech Republic..
    Evaluation of extraction methods for quantitative analysis of tardigrade populations in soil and leaf litter2018In: Pedobiologia, ISSN 0031-4056, E-ISSN 1873-1511, Vol. 70, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate quantitative analysis of soil tardigrades depends on a relevant extraction method. Over the years, a number of different methods have been used, but the efficiency of these methods has rarely been evaluated for soil and leaf litter tardigrades. Four methods of extraction were compared in this study: the light-cooling (L-C) extractor, the high-gradient (H-G), Baermann extractor, the non-gradient (N-G) Baermann extractor and sieves.The results indicate that light and temperature are significant factors influencing tardigrade extraction. The L-C and H-G extractors were more effective than sieves for all substrate categories. These extraction methods (L-C and H-G) therefore seem to be appropriate for quantitative studies of soil and leaf litter tardigrades.

  • 6.
    Dessborn, Lisa
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Bidrar gäss och svanar  till övergödning av våtmarker?2018In: Fakta för förvaltare: gäss och svanar: kunskapssammanställning om bete, övergödning, smittspridning och skyddsjakt / [ed] Johan Elmberg & Johan Månsson, Stockholm: Naturvårdsverket , 2018, p. 33-47Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    • Swans and geese occur in larger numbers near more people than ever before, in Sweden as well as in Western Europe.

    • Increasing populations sometimes lead to problems and conflicts. On agricultural land geese and swans can cause costly damage to growing crops. Intense grazing by these birds may also affect natural vegetation, sometimes leading to conflict with conservation and biodiversity goals.

    • Geese and swans are obligate herbivores, consuming leaves, stems, seeds and root parts of terrestrial and aquatic plants.

    • Grazing on growing crops may cause conflicts of interest also when geese and swans congregate in large numbers in wetlands adjacent to cropland.

    • Geese and swans provide a multitude of ecosystem services, for example viewing, hunting, meat, and eco-tourism revenues. GEESE AND SWANS AS VECTORS OF NUTRIENTS

    • Geese and swans eat large amounts of plant material, have a relatively inefficient digestive system, and produce a lot of droppings.

    • These birds find most of their food on land, but spend a large part of the day  resting on wetlands, where they also defecate.

    • In autumn, winter and spring most geese and swans make daily flights between feeding and roost sites, thereby becoming vectors of nutrients to wetlands and lakes

  • 7.
    Djerf, Henric
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Lacoursière, Jean O
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Mårtensson, Lennart
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Can wetlands reduce humic substances in forested streams: combining two approaches to characterize efficiency2018In: Book of abstracts: Linnaeus ECO-TECH '18, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Establishing statistical significance in assessing wetland performance can be quite challenging when reduction in the monitored substance is very small and temporarily variable. Assessing colour changes associated with humic substances is such a situation. One of the most important parameters of any evaluation of wetland treatment performances is the retention time of the water before it exit the wetland. This can be theoretically estimated, but even better measured directly with the help of a tracing agent. In this research, the approach is based on the simultaneously assessment of hydraulic retention time using conservative tracing (Rhodamine WT) and a mass balance based removal efficiency assessment (regression slope of the summation mass-in vs. summation mass-out).

  • 8.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Goose poop in the park2018In: Bottom Line Health, ISSN 1092-0129, Vol. 32, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Rekordmånga lyckade häckningar av vitrygg2018In: Vår fågelvärld, ISSN 0042-2649, Vol. 77, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Berg, Charlotte
    Lerner, Henrik
    Sprider gäss och svanar smittsamma sjukdomar?2018In: Fakta för förvaltare: gäss och svanar: kunskapssammanställning om bete, övergödning, smittspridning och skyddsjak / [ed] Johan Elmberg & Johan Månsson, Stockholm: Naturvårdsverket , 2018, p. 49-65Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    • Swans and geese occur in larger numbers near more people than ever before, in Sweden as well as in Western Europe.

    • Increasing populations sometimes lead to problems and conflicts. On agricultural land geese and swans can cause costly damage to growing crops. Intense grazing by these birds may also affect natural vegetation, sometimes leading to conflict with conservation and biodiversity goals.

    • Geese and swans are obligate herbivores, consuming leaves, stems, seeds and  root parts of terrestrial and aquatic plants. • Grazing on growing crops may cause conflicts of interest also when geese and swans congregate in large numbers in wetlands adjacent to cropland.

    • Geese and swans provide a multitude of ecosystem services, for example viewing, hunting, meat, and eco-tourism revenues. GEESE AND SWANS AS VECTORS OF DISEASE

    • A large number of disease agents has been recorded in geese and swans, viz. viruses, bacteria and unicellular parasites. • Some of these have the capacity to infect other bird species and mammals.

    • Geese and swans are highly mobile and often occur close to humans and in our agricultural landscape. As a consequence, they are sometimes suspected of  transmitting disease to livestock and humans

  • 11.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Månsson, JohanSveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Fakta för förvaltare: gäss och svanar: kunskapssammanställning om bete, övergödning, smittspridning och skyddsjakt2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    GÄSSEN I SVERIGE blir allt fler. De flesta gåsarter ökar i antal och med växande populationer ökar också konflikterna mellan samhällsintressen och människor som berörs av gässen. Ändrade flyttningsmönster är ett annat exempel på hur  förutsättningarna för förvaltningen av gäss och svanar påverkas. I den strategi för svensk viltförvaltning som Naturvårdsverket har tagit fram betonas en förvaltning byggd på kvalitetssäkrad kunskap och förvaltningen av gäss är ett bra exempel på vikten av aktuell kunskap när omständigheterna förändras. Viltstrategin beskriver de vägval som Naturvårdsverket avser att genomföra för att utveckla och stärka Sveriges viltförvaltning fram till år 2020. Bland annat ska arbetet med att förebygga skador och andra problem som vilt orsakar utvecklas, tillsammans med övriga berörda organisationer. Strategin betonar också att svensk viltförvaltning ska bygga på den bästa tillgängliga kunskapen och att Naturvårdsverket har ett stort ansvar för att se till att aktuell kunskap kommer till användning. Forskarna Johan Elmberg och Johan Månsson har på uppdrag av Naturvårdsverkets vetenskapliga kommitté för viltforskning gjort en litteraturöversikt om befintlig kunskap om gäss och om framtida kunskapsbehov. Kunskapssammanställningen ligger också till grund för ett större gåsforskningsprojekt under ledning av Johan Elmberg och Johan Månsson, med start 2017. I Naturvårdsverkets arbete med att ta fram vetenskapligt underlag till stöd för viltförvaltningen är gåsprojektet en viktig pusselbit som är tänkt att under de kommande åren kunna ge ytterligare kunskap till en gåsförvaltning i förändring. Författarna svarar ensamma för rapportens innehåll, slutsatser och rekommendationer

  • 12.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Tombre, Ingunn
    Påverkar betande gäss och svanar jordbruket2018In: Fakta för förvaltare: gäss och svanar: kunskapssammanställning om bete,övergödning, smittspridning och skyddsjakt / [ed] Johan Elmberg & Johan Månsson, Stockholm: Naturvårdsverket , 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Swans and geese occur in larger numbers near more people than ever before,  in Sweden as well as in Western Europe.

    • Increasing populations sometimes lead to problems and conflicts. On agricultural land geese and swans can cause costly damage to growing crops. Intense grazing by these birds may also affect natural vegetation, sometimes leading to conflict with conservation and biodiversity goals.

    • Geese and swans are obligate herbivores, consuming leaves, stems, seeds and root parts of terrestrial and aquatic  plants.

    • Grazing on growing crops may cause conflicts of interest also when geese and swans congregate in large numbers in wetlands adjacent to  cropland.

    • Geese and swans provide a multitude of ecosystem services, for example viewing, hunting, meat, and eco-tourism revenues.

    GEESE AND SWANS AS   HERBIVORES

    • As their diet is very rich in fibres and water, geese and swans must consume large amounts of plant material in order to obtain enough nutrients (mainly proteins and carbohydrates).

    • Geese and swans have a highly developed capability to assess the nutrient compo- sition of different species and parts of plants. This is true for proteins and easily digestible carbohydrates, and also for components that are hard to digest or unpala- table. As a consequence, these birds are very selective feeders, if given a   choice.

    • Nutrient needs vary over the year; in autumn and spring relatively more proteins are consumed, whilst plants rich in energy are favoured in winter.

    • In general, agricultural crops contain more nutrients than the natural food plants of geese and swans. As a result, feeding on agricultural land is almost always marter choice’ for them.

  • 13.
    Gashi Krasniqi, Lauresha
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Jämförelse av två enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays: mätning av diabetesspecifika autoantikroppar i en adult population2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Type- 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease with insulin deficiency caused by degradation of insulin- producing betacells in pancreas. Four different autoantibodies that target beta- cell specific antigenes have been identified: insulinautoantibodies (IAA), glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA), islet antigen2-antibodies (IA-2A) and antibodies against zinktransporter 8 (ZnT8A). In this study, a comparison between 2screen islet cell autoantibody ELISA-kit (RSR, Cardiff, UK) coated with GAD65/IA-2 and 3screen islet cell autoantibody ELISA- kit (RSR, Cardiff, UK) coated with GAD65/IA-2/ZnT8, was performed to investigate whether results from these two kits provide comparable sensitivity and specificity in an adult population of new onset patients with T1D and healthy adults. RSR 2screen obtained 1 % higher specificity (98 %) in comparison to RSR 3screen (97 %) on the same sensitivity (92 %) and is recommended primarily for screening of autoantibodies in a population of adult patients at increased risk for T1D and healthy adults blood donors.

  • 14.
    Gulsrud, Natalie M.
    et al.
    Denmark.
    Raymond, Christopher M.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Rutt, Rebecca L.
    Denmark.
    Stahl Olafson, Anton
    Denmark.
    Plieninger, Tobias
    Denmark.
    Sandberg, Mattias
    University of Gothenburg.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    ‘Rage against the machine’?: the opportunities and risks concerning the automation of urban green infrastructure2018In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 180, p. 85-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary society is increasingly impacted by automation; however, few studies have considered the potential consequences of automation on ecosystems and their management (hereafter the automation of urbangreen infrastructure or UGI). This Perspective Essay takes up this discussion by asking how a digital approach to UGI planning and management mediates the configuration and development of UGI and to whose benefit? This is done through a review of key issues and trends in digital approaches to UGI planning and management. We first conceptualize automation from a social, ecological, and technological interactions perspective and use this lens to present an overview of the risks and opportunities of UGI automation with respect to selected case studies. Results of this analysis are used to develop a conceptual framework for the assessment of the material and governance implications of automated UGIs. We find that, within any given perspective, the automation of UGI entails a complex dialectic between efficiency, human agency and empowerment. Further, risks and opportunities associated with UGI automation are not fixed but are dynamic properties of changing contextual tensions concerning power, actors, rules of the game and discourse at multiple scales. We conclude the paper by outlining a research agenda on how to consider different digital advances within a social-ecological-technological approach.

  • 15.
    Hernroth, Bodil
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). KVA.
    Baden, S
    Gothenburg University.
    Tassidis, Helena
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Hörnaeus, K
    Uppsala University.
    Guillemant, J
    Uppsala University.
    Bergström Lind, S
    Uppsala University.
    Bergquist, J
    Uppsala University.
    Impact of oceanacidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilusedulis)2016In: Fish and Shellfish Immunology, ISSN 1050-4648, E-ISSN 1095-9947, Vol. 55, p. 452-459Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Hernroth, Bodil
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Baden, Susanne
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Sjukare skaldjur i framtidens hav2018In: HavsUtsik, Vol. 01Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Klimatförändringarna försämrar immunförsvaret hos kräftor, musslor och sjöstjärnor, och gör att de lättare får infektioner. De smittsamma bakterierna och virusen ser däremot inte ut att fara illa i den förändrade miljön. En dålig kombination för ekosystemet, och för oss konsumenter av marina skaldjur.

  • 17.
    Holopainen, Sari
    et al.
    Finland.
    Arzel, Céline
    Finland.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Fox, Anthony D
    Danmark.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Frankrike.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Nummi, Petri
    Finland.
    Sjöberg, Kjell
    Swedish Univ of Agricultural Sciences.
    Väänänen, Veli-Matti
    Finland.
    Alhainen, M
    Finland.
    Pöysä, Hannu
    Finland.
    Sustainable management of migratory European ducks: finding model species2018In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eurasian migratory duck species represent a natural resource shared between European countries. As is evident throughout human harvest history, lack of coordinated management and monitoring at appropriate levels often leads to ‘the tragedy of the commons’, where shared populations suffer overexploitation. Effective management can also be hampered by poor understanding of the factors that limit and regulate migratory populations throughout their flyways, and over time. Following decades of population increase, some European duck populations now show signs of levelling off or even decline, underlining the need for more active and effective management. In Europe, the existing mechanisms for delivering effective management of duck populations are limited, despite the need and enthusiasm for establishing adaptive management (AM) schemes for wildlife populations. Existing international legal agreements already oblige European countries to sustainably manage migratory waterbirds. Although the lack of coordinated demographic and hunting data remains a challenge to sustainable management planning, AM provides a robust decision-making framework even in the presence of uncertainty regarding demographic and other information. In this paper we investigate the research and monitoring needs in Europe to successfully apply AM to ducks, and search for possible model species, focusing on freshwater species (in contrast to sea duck species) in the East Atlantic flyway. Based on current knowledge, we suggest that common teal Anas crecca, Eurasian wigeon Mareca penelope and common goldeneye Bucephala clangula represent the best species for testing the application of an AM modelling approach to duck populations in Europe. Applying AM to huntable species with relatively good population data as models for broader implementation represents a cost effect to develop AM on a European flyway scale for ducks, and potentially other waterbirds in the future.

  • 18. Holopainen, Sari
    et al.
    Arzel, Céline
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Fox, Anthony D
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Nummi, Petri
    Sjöberg, Kjell
    Väänänen, Veli-Matti
    Alhainen, M
    Pöysä, Hannu
    Sustainable management of migratory European ducks: finding model species2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Eurasian migratory ducks are a natural resource shared between multiple European countries. Due to lack of flyway-level management and monitoring, there is a risk of “the tragedy of the commons” arising, where populations are overexploited. Effective management may also be hindered by a poor understanding of the factors that limit and regulate migratory populations throughout their flyways, and over time. Following decades of population increase, some European duck populations now show signs of levelling off or even decline, underlining the need for more active management. In Europe, we lack effective common tools to manage duck populations, despite the need and enthusiasm for establishing flyway-level adaptive management (AM) schemes for migratory birds. There are several international legal agreements (e.g. EEC Birds Directive, AEWA) that oblige European countries to sustainably manage migratory birds and their habitats. Although the lack of coordinated demographic and hunting data remains a challenge to sustainable management planning for waterfowl, AM provides a robust decision-making framework even in the presence of uncertainty.

    We investigate the research and monitoring needs in Europe to successfully apply AM to ducks, and search for possible model species, focusing on freshwater duck species.  Our geographical focus is NW Europe (excluding Russia), the area utilized by ducks in the East-Atlantic flyway. Based on current knowledge and their wide distribution, we suggest that Common Teal Anas crecca, Eurasian Wigeon Mareca penelopeand Common Goldeneye Bucephala clangulawould be the best species for testing the application of an AM modelling approach for ducks in Europe. Applying AM to huntable species with relatively good population data as models for broader implementation represents a cost effective way of starting to develop AM on a European flyway scale for ducks and other harvested waterbirds.

  • 19.
    Hultberg, Malin
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Bodin, Hristina
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Effects of fungal-assisted algal harvesting through biopellet formation on pesticides in water2018In: Biodegradation, ISSN 0923-9820, E-ISSN 1572-9729, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 557-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research has demonstrated the potential of using filamentous fungi to form pellets with microalgae (biopellets), in order to facilitate harvesting of microalgae from water following algae-based treatment of wastewater. In parallel, there is a need to develop techniques for removing organic pollutants such as pesticides and pharmaceuticals from wastewater. In experiments using the microalga Chlorella vulgaris, the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger and biopellets composed of these microorganisms, this study investigated whether fungal-assisted algal harvesting can also remove pesticides from contaminated water. A mixture of 38 pesticides was tested and the concentrations of 17 of these were found to be reduced significantly in the biopellet treatment, compared with the control. After harvesting, the concentration of total pesticides in the algal treatment did not differ significantly from that in the control. However, in the fungal treatment and biopellet treatment, the concentration was significantly lower (59.6 ± 2.0 µg/L and 56.1 ± 2.8 µg/L, respectively) than in the control (66.6 ± 1.0 µg/L). Thus fungal-assisted algal harvesting through biopellet formation can also provide scope for removing organic pollutants from wastewater, with removal mainly being performed by the fungus.

  • 20.
    Höijer, Karin
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Redefining education about food traditions in Swedish home economics education: report from a lesson study2018In: “What is happening in home economics?”: a spotlight on European activities / [ed] EAHE, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The syllabus for Home Economics in Sweden has a concrete culture perspective tied to cultural variations and food traditions (Skolverket 2011, 2016). Culture has been described as pivotal to how we socially understand the world around us (Burr 2003, Gerger 2009), which means that the world isn’t neutral to us but rather understood from one cultural perspective or another (Hastrup 2004). Research (Bohm 2016, Höijer 2013) has illustrated how food selected to be included in Home Economics education primarily is chosen by the teacher, and also that the teacher is embedded in the cultural and structural traditions that are (re)constructed in society and school. Education about food in Home Economics is contested in the sense that students and teachers’ cultural perspective are misaligned and students’ experiences rarely are taken as a starting point (Höijer 2013). So far there has been no research investigating how education about food traditions is realized, but experience suggests that it often entails baking traditional saffron buns in December or to speak about geographical regions rather than to investigate food as codes, images, values, experiences and ways of thinking that groups of people share. The main aim of the project was to develop Home Economic teachers competence in a Swedish municipality, the specific aim was to develop education about food traditions.

    Between August of 2017 and January 2018 a competence development project was carried out in a large municipality near Stockholm. The project was planned as a combination between lectures and research in the form of a lesson study (Lewis 2002; Lewis, Perry & Murata 2006; Murata 2011). In the lesson study a specific lesson was planned by the whole group and carried out by one teacher, and observed by other teachers. Analysis and revision of the lesson was done by the whole group.

  • 21.
    Kumar, Sanjeev
    et al.
    India.
    Bhavya, P S
    India.
    Ramesh, R
    India.
    Gupta, G V M
    India.
    Chiriboga, Fidel
    University of Gothenburg.
    Singh, Arvind
    India.
    Karunasagar, Indrani
    India.
    Rai, Ashwin
    India.
    Rehnstam-Holm, Ann-Sofi
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Edler, Lars
    WEAQ Lab.
    Godhe, Anna
    University of Gothenburg.
    Nitrogen uptake potential under different temperature-salinity conditions: implications for nitrogen cycling under climate change scenarios2018In: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 141, p. 196-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As projected by climate change models, increase in sea surface temperature and precipitation in the future may alter nutrient cycling in the coastal regions due to potential changes in phytoplankton community structure and their ability to assimilate nitrogen (N) and carbon (C). An experiment simulating different temperature and salinity conditions (28°C-35 ambient conditions, 28ºC-31, 31ºC-35 and 31ºC-31) in mesocosms containing 1000 L of coastal water from the Arabian Sea was performed and N uptake rates were measured using 15N tracer technique on 2nd, 5th, 7th and 10th day of the experiment. The results show that, under all conditions, the total N (NO3- + NH4+) uptake rates were lower in the beginning and on the final day of the tracer experiment, while it peaked during middle, consistent with chlorophyll a concentrations. Total N uptake rate was significantly lower (p = 0.003) under ambient temperature-lower salinity condition (28ºC-31) than the others. This indicates that lowering of salinity in coastal regions due to excessive rainfall in the future may affect the N uptake potential of the phytoplankton, which may change the regional C and N budget.

  • 22.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Manderstedt, Eric
    Kristianstad University, Plattformen för molekylär analys. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Carlberg, Daniel
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Lethagen, Stefan
    Skåne University Hospital in Malmö.
    Halldén, Christer
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Genetic variation in the syntaxin-binding protein STXBP5 in type 1 von Willebrand disease patients2018In: Thrombosis and haemostasis, ISSN 2567-689X, Vol. 118, no 8, p. 1382-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels in healthy individuals and in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease (VWD) are influenced by genetic variation in several genes, for example, VWF, ABO and STXBP5. Here, we comprehensively screen for STXBP5 variants and investigate their association with type 1 VWD in Swedish patients and controls. The coding region of the STXBP5 gene was re-sequenced in 107 type 1 VWD patients and the detected variants were genotyped in the type 1 VWD population and a Swedish control population (464 individuals). The functional effects of missense alleles were predicted in silico and the pattern of genetic variation in STXBP5 was analysed. Re-sequencing of 107 type 1 VWD patients identified three missense and three synonymous variants in the coding sequence of STXBP5. The low-frequency missense variants rs144099092 (0.005) and rs148830578 (0.029) were predicted to be damaging, but were not accumulated in patients. No other rare candidate mutations were detected. STXBP5 showed a high level of linkage disequilibrium and a low overall nucleotide diversity of π = 3.2 × 10-4 indicating intolerance to variants affecting protein function. Three previously type 1 VWD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms were located on one haplotype that showed an increased frequency in patients versus controls. No differences in messenger ribonucleic acid abundance among haplotypes could be found using Genotype-Tissue Expression project data. In conclusion, a haplotype containing the STXBP5 Asn436Ser (rs1039084) mutation is associated with type 1 VWD and no rare STXBP5 mutations contribute to type 1 VWD in the Swedish population.

  • 23.
    Manderstedt, Eric
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Plattformen för molekylär analys. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Lethagen, Stefan
    Danmark & Lund University.
    Halldén, Christer
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Genetic variation in the C-type lectin receptor CLEC4M in type 1 von Willebrand Disease patients2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels in healthy individuals and in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease (VWD) are influenced by genetic variation in several genes, e.g. VWF, ABO, STXBP5 and CLEC4M. This study aims to screen comprehensively for CLEC4M variants and investigate their association with type 1 VWD in the Swedish population. In order to screen for CLEC4M variants, the CLEC4M gene region was re-sequenced and the polymorphic neck region was genotyped in 106 type 1 VWD patients from unrelated type 1 VWD families. Single nucleotide variants (SNV) and variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) allele and genotype frequencies were then compared with 294 individuals from the 1000Genomes project and 436 Swedish control individuals. Re-sequencing identified a total of 42 SNVs. Rare variants showed no accumulation in type 1 VWD patients and are not thought to contribute substantially to type 1 VWD. The only missense mutation (rs2277998, NP_001138379.1:p.Asp224Asn) had a higher frequency in type 1 VWD patients than in controls (4.9%). The VNTR genotypes 57 and 67 were observed at higher frequencies than expected in type 1 VWD patients (6.4% and 6.2%) and showed an increase in patients compared with controls (7.4% and 3.1%). Strong linkage disequilibrium in the CLEC4M region makes it difficult to distinguish between the effect of the missense mutation and the VNTR genotypes. In conclusion, heterozygous VNTR genotypes 57 and 67 of CLEC4M were highly enriched and are the most likely mechanism through which CLEC4M contributes to disease in the Swedish type 1 VWD population.

  • 24.
    Manderstedt, Eric
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Plattformen för molekylär analys. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Lethagen, Stefan
    Danmark.
    Halldén, Christer
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Genetic variation in the von Willebrand factor gene in Swedish von Willebrand disease patients2018In: TH Open, ISSN 2512-9465, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 39-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) level and function are influenced by genetic variation in VWF and several other genes in von Willebrand disease type 1 (VWD1) patients. This study comprehensively screened for VWF variants and investigated the presence of ABO genotypes and common and rare VWF variants in Swedish VWD1 patients. The VWF gene was resequenced using Ion Torrent and Sanger sequencing in 126 index cases historically diagnosed with VWD. Exon 7 of the ABO gene was resequenced using Sanger sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis was used to investigate for copy number variants. Genotyping of 98 single nucleotide variants allowed allele frequency comparisons with public databases. Seven VWD2 mutations and 36 candidate VWD1 mutations (5 deletions, 4 nonsense, 21 missense, 1 splice, and 5 synonymous mutations) were identified. Nine mutations were found in more than one family and nine VWD1 index cases carried more than one candidate mutation. The T-allele of rs1063857 (c.2385T > C, p.Y795 = ) and blood group O were both frequent findings and contributed to disease in the Swedish VWD1 population. VWD2 mutations were found in 20 and candidate VWD1 mutations in 51 index cases out of 106 (48%). VWF mutations, a VWF haplotype, and blood group O all contributed to explain disease in Swedish VWD1 patients.

  • 25.
    Mohlin, Camilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Delbro, Dick
    Örebro University.
    Kvanta, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. kjell.johansson@hkr.se .
    Evaluation of Congo red staining in degenerating porcine photoreceptors in vitro: protective effects by structural and trophic support2018In: Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, ISSN 0022-1554, E-ISSN 1551-5044, Vol. 66, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Congo red (CR) is a histological stain used for the detection of extracellular amyloids mediating various neurodegenerative diseases. Given that damaged photoreceptors appear to degenerate similarly to other nerve cells, CR staining was evaluated in experimentally injured porcine retina. CR staining appeared mostly as discrete cytosolic deposits with no obvious plaque formation during the investigated time period. Increases of CR labeling coincided temporally with the known accumulation of mislocalized opsins and increases of cell death. Coculture, either with human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE) or human neural progenitor (ReN) cells, was accompanied by a significant reduction of CR labeling. Of particular interest was the reduction of CR labeling in cone photoreceptors, which are important for the perception of color and fine details and afflicted in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Electron microscopy revealed inclusions in the inner segment, cell body, and occasionally synaptic terminals of photoreceptor cells in cultured specimens. Closer examinations indicated the presence of different types of inclusions resembling protein aggregates as well as inclusion bodies. The current results indicate that injury-related response resulted in accumulation of CR deposits in photoreceptor cells, and that trophic and/or structural support attenuated this response.

  • 26.
    Olsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Liljebäck, Niklas
    Swedish Association for hunting and wildlife management.
    Kruckenberg, Helmut
    Germany.
    Voslamber, Berend
    Netherlands.
    J.D.M. Muskens, Gerard
    Netherlands.
    Månsson, Johan
    Swedish university of agricultural sciences.
    Long-distance and local movements of greylag geese in present-day agricultural landscapes2018In: 18th Conference of Goose Specialist Group: Conference Abstracts / [ed] Rasa Morkune, Modestas Bruzas, Julius Morkunas, Marine Institute of Klaipeda University , 2018, p. 77-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent changes in environmental conditions together with increasing goose populations have completely changed the ballgame for geese in Europe. To better understand their current distribution and foraging patterns, this project will explore how geese utilize the agricultural landscape, with focus on their movements, field selection and foraging patterns. We fitted 199 Greylag geese with neck-collars and 64 with GPS transmitters at 5 locations in Sweden. The tagged geese will be used for studying movement patterns at a field-tofield level. However, the GPS transmitters also deliver data that can be used together with re-sightnings of neck-collared geese to unravel large-scale movement patterns of the Swedish Greylag goose population. Preliminary results from GPS positions received June--November 2017 indicate a varation in migration patterns and wintering grounds, depending on the origin of the geese. Geese breeding and molting in the southern parts of Sweden seem to migrate shorter distances, and have spent most of their time during the autumn months in Denmark, or in the southernmost parts of Sweden, while the geese marked farther north migrated earlier and moved longer distances, with the majority spending the autumn in Germany and the Netherlands.

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