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  • 51.
    Khalaf, Atika
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Berggren, Vanja
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Mat, måltid, hälsa i 24-timmarsperspektivet. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Hazzaa, A-H
    Association of weight status and dietary habits with socio-demographic factors among university female students in Saudi Arabia2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Khalaf, Atika
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Karolinska Institute.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Berggren, Vanja
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Karolinska Institute.
    Hazzaa, A-H
    Saudi Arabia.
    Discrepancies between actual, perceived and ideal body image among young female university students in southwestern Saudi Arabia2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale: Body-shape preference is an important determinant of obesity and underweight, but studies on body image among females in the Arab region are, at most, scanty. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of underweight and overweight/obesity among Saudi Arabian female university students, and to investigate discrepancies between their actual, perceived and ideal body shape.

    Methods: This cross sectional study included 663  female students in a university centre in Saudi Arabia. Anthropometric measurements including weight, height, BMI and body image scale (9-figures silhouette) were used. A cross-tabulation was made between “warped self-image” against “subjective goal image”. Regression analysis was used to predict variables related to body image perception.

    Results: The participants had a mean age of 20.4 years (SD 1.5), 16% were underweight and 25% were over- weight/obese.Discrepancy in subjective goal image: 44% wished they were slimmer and 20% that they were heavier than what they perceived themselves. Thus, 36% were happy with their current body shape.Warped self-image: It was 16% that thought they were slimmer and 18% that they were heavier than what they actually were. Thus, in 61% of cases the perceived body image was in agreement with their actual body shape. Cross-tabulation showed that only 23% had an agreemen tbetween their actual, perceived and ideal body shape. Of all variables entered into the regression analysis, only BMI was able to predict how the subject perceives herself in the body image scale (R square = 0.676; p < 0.000). None of the variables entered was significant enough to predict how the subject wishes to look like.

    Conclusion: Discrepancies between actual, perceived and ideal body image is common among the Saudi Arabian female students and can possibly lead to eating disorders and increased  prevalence of underweight oroverweight/obesity.

  • 53.
    Khalaf, Atika
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa
    Berggren, Vanja
    Nurses bridging malnutrition and physical inactivity: nurses’ views and experiences of caring for malnourished patients in surgical settings in Saudi Arabia – A qualitative study2014In: BMC Nursing, Vol. 13, no 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Although the occurrence of malnutrition in hospitals is a growing concern, little is known about how hospital staff understand the care that nurses provide to patients with malnutrition. The purpose of this study was to explore nurses’ views and experiences of caring for malnourished patients in Saudi Arabia (KSA).

    Methods

    Using a qualitative explorative design, fifteen nurses were interviewed as part of a purposive sample hospital staff. The transcripts were analyzed using latent content analysis.

    Results

    The nurses spontaneously and consistently linked malnutrition with physical inactivity. The two main categories, which emerged, were: ‘Potentials for nurses to provide good nutrition and physical activity’, and ‘Having the ability but not the power to promote proper nutrition and physical activity’. These arose from the subcategories: Good nursing implies providing appropriate health education; Acknowledging the Mourafiq (sitter) as a potential resource for the nursing, but also as a burden; Inadequate control and lack of influence; Cultural diversity and lack of dialog; and Views of women’s weight gain in KSA society.

    Conclusions

    The nurses felt they have the capacity and passion to further improve the nutrition and activity of their patients, but obstacles in the health care system are impeding these ambitions. The implications for nursing practice could be acknowledgement of the nurses’ views in the clinical practice; culturally adjusted care, improved communication and enhanced language skills.

  • 54.
    Khalaf, Atika
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm.
    Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M.
    King Saud University, Riyadh.
    Berggren, Vanja
    Lund University.
    Nurses' views and experiences of caring for malnourished patients in surgical settings in Saudi Arabia: a qualitative study2014In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 13, p. 29-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although the occurrence of malnutrition in hospitals is a growing concern, little is known about how hospital staff understand the care that nurses provide to patients with malnutrition. The purpose of this study was to explore nurses' views and experiences of caring for malnourished patients in Saudi Arabia (KSA).

    METHODS: Using a qualitative explorative design, fifteen nurses were interviewed as part of a purposive sample hospital staff. The transcripts were analyzed using latent content analysis.

    RESULTS: The nurses spontaneously and consistently linked malnutrition with physical inactivity. The two main categories, which emerged, were: 'Potentials for nurses to provide good nutrition and physical activity', and 'Having the ability but not the power to promote proper nutrition and physical activity'. These arose from the subcategories: Good nursing implies providing appropriate health education; Acknowledging the Mourafiq (sitter) as a potential resource for the nursing, but also as a burden; Inadequate control and lack of influence; Cultural diversity and lack of dialog; and Views of women's weight gain in KSA society.

    CONCLUSIONS: The nurses felt they have the capacity and passion to further improve the nutrition and activity of their patients, but obstacles in the health care system are impeding these ambitions. The implications for nursing practice could be acknowledgement of the nurses' views in the clinical practice; culturally adjusted care, improved communication and enhanced language skills.

  • 55.
    Lindskov, Susanne
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan. Censtralsjukhuset, Kristianstad.
    Hagell, Peter
    Lunds universitet.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Viktförändring - ett problem vid Parkinsons sjukdom2010In: I vården, ISSN 2000-4141, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 24-26Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Lindskov, Susanne
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Sjoberg, Klas
    Lund University.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Weight stability in Parkinson's disease2016In: Nutritional neuroscience, ISSN 1028-415X, E-ISSN 1476-8305, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Parkinson's disease (PD) has traditionally been associated with weight loss. However, recent studies have not found any evidence of underweight in PD. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed nutritional status changes over time in relation to other clinical PD features. Here, we explore changes in nutritional status and motor and non-motor PD features (including dopaminergic drug therapy) in PD patients after 1 year. Methods: Motor and non-motor PD features, dopaminergic drug therapy, under-nutrition and malnutrition risk, and anthropometric measures (BMI, handgrip strength, triceps skin-fold, mid-arm circumference, and mid-upper arm muscle circumference) were assessed at baseline and 1 year later among 65 people with PD. Results: Disability, PD motor symptoms, dysautonomia, and dopaminergic drug therapy increased. Underweight was uncommon both at baseline (n= 3) and follow-up (n = 2); malnutrition risk was common but stable (88 and 92%), whereas triceps skin-fold increased (P = 0.030); mid-upper arm muscle circumference decreased (P = 0.002); and the proportion of people with low handgrip strength (P = 0.012) increased. Correlations between nutritional variables and motor and non-motor PD features were absent to modest. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that baseline pupillomotor functioning was associated with decreased weight and BMI, and sleep with increased weight and BMI. In addition, increases in anxiety were associated with decreased weight, BMI, and triceps skin-fold. Discussion: During the PD course, there seems to be redistribution in body composition from muscle to fat. Studies are needed to identify possible explanations for the findings. This implies that malnutrition should be regularly screened to identify those at risk of developing reduced muscle mass and increased morbidity.

  • 57.
    Lindskov, Susanne
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Sjöberg, K.
    Lunds universitet.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Malnutrition risk in Parkinson's disease2014In: Journal of Aging Research & Clinical Practice, ISSN 2258-8094, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 93-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Unintentional weight loss and undernutrition have been found common in  Parkinson’s disease but its relation to other disease aspects is unclear.

    Objectives: To explore nutritional status in relation to disease duration in Parkinson’s disease, as well as associations between nutritional status and motor and autonomic features.

    Design: Cross-sectional.

    Setting: South-Swedish outpatient Parkinson-clinic.

    Participants: Home-dwelling people with Parkinson’s disease (n=71), without significant cognitive impairment (mean age, 67.3 years; 56% men; mean disease duration, 6.3 years).

    Measurements: Parkinsonian motor symptoms, mobility, activity level, disability, dyskinesias, dysautonomia, under- and malnutrition risk screening (using MEONF II and MUST for undernutrition and SCREEN II for malnutrition) and anthropometric measures (BMI, handgrip strength, triceps skin-fold, mid-arm circumference and mid-upper arm muscle circumference) were recorded. The sample was divided into those with longer (n=34) and shorter disease duration (n=37) according to the median (5 years).

    Results: Longer disease duration was associated with more, disability, dyskinesias and dysautonomia than shorter duration (P ≤0.04). Mean (SD) body weight and BMI were 80.3 (16.3) kg and 28.1 (4.8) kg/m 2, respectively, and did not differ between duration groups (body weight, 80.9 vs. 79.6 kg; BMI, 28.0 vs. 28.3 kg/m 2; P≥0.738). There were no differences in other anthropometric measures between duration groups (P ≥0.300). BMI identified 4% and 62% as under- and overweight, respectively, and 4% exhibited  undernutrition risk, whereas 87% were at risk for malnutrition. Nutritional and motor/dysautonomic variables showed relatively weak correlations (r s, ≤ 0.33), but people with orthostatic hypotension had lower BMI (26.7 vs 29.2 kg/m 2; P=0.026) and lower handgrip strength (33.2 vs 41.6 kg; P=0.025) than those without orthostatic hypotension.

    Conclusion: Motor and autonomic features showed expected relationships with disease duration. In contrast to these observations, and to most previous reports on nutrition in PD, frequencies of underweight and undernutrition were low. However, malnutrition risk was high, emphasizing the need for regular clinical monitoring of nutritional status. The reasons for the preserved nutritional status have to be explored prospectively.

  • 58.
    Lindskov, Susanne
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Sjöberg, Klas
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Weight loss in Parkinson´s disease?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Lindskov, Susanne
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Sjöberg, Klas
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Weight loss in Parkinson´s disease?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Lindskov, Susanne
    et al.
    Department of Geriatrics and Neurology, Central Hospital Kristianstad.
    Westergren, Albert
    Research and Development Unit, Central Hospital Kristianstad.
    Hagell, Peter
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    A controlled trial of an educational programme for people with Parkinson's disease2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 11C, p. 368-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate patient-reported health outcomes of a multidisciplinary group educational programme for people with Parkinson's disease (PD), delivered as part of routine clinical practice. BACKGROUND: Studies suggest that educational programmes for people with PD have potential to improve patients' perceived health and well-being. However, controlled trials of multidisciplinary group educational programmes are lacking. DESIGN: Naturalistic non-randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Following ethical approval and informed consent, 48 people with PD (58% men; mean age, 69.3) received the intervention and 48 (52% men; mean age, 72) were allocated to a delayed intervention control group. The intervention was a six-week (two hours per week) multidisciplinary group educational programme. Patient-reported health outcomes were assessed by the 12-item short-form health survey (SF-12) at baseline and one month postintervention. RESULTS: Changes in SF-12 scores at follow-up did not differ between the groups and there were no within-group differences over time. Daily dopaminergic medication increased in the control group but not in the intervention group. CONCLUSIONS: Slightly, but significantly, increased drug requirement in the control group may in part have masked deterioration in perceived health. However, failure to demonstrate improved patient-reported health may relate to the intervention design, response shift (i.e. change in how people perceive their health), and/or quality and choice of outcome measures. Further studies that take these aspects into consideration are needed to determine the potential for patient education interventions in PD. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses and other healthcare professionals need to document the effects of patient educational programmes and to be aware of the importance of intervention design and challenges associated with evaluating programme outcomes. Otherwise, there is a risk that benefits cannot be demonstrated and that decision makers will not invest resources in interventions that actually are beneficial for chronically ill people.

  • 61.
    Lindskov, Susanne
    et al.
    Centralsjukhuset, Kristianstad.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Hagell, Peter
    Lunds universitet.
    Patientundervisning vid Parkinsons sjukdom2010In: I vården, ISSN 2000-4141, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 28-30Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Nielsen, M
    et al.
    Danmark.
    Maribo, T
    Danmark.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Melgaard, D
    Danmark.
    Associations between eating difficulties, nutritional status and activity of daily living in acute geriatric patients2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Nielsen, Mie Marie
    et al.
    Danmark.
    Maribo, Thomas
    Danmark.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Melgaard, Dorte
    Danmark.
    Associations between eating difficulties, nutritional status and activity of daily living in acute geriatric patients2018In: Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, ISSN 2405-4577, Vol. 25, p. 95-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & aims

    Eating difficulties, having a poor nutritional status, and low activity of daily living are all prevalent issues in the geriatric population. The aim of this study was to explore associations between patients' eating difficulties, their nutritional status and their activity of daily living in patients aged 60 years or older who were admitted to an acute geriatric unit.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional study was conducted between March and September 2016 at the geriatric department of North Denmark Regional Hospital, Hjørring. The inclusion criteria were: ≥ 60years old and hospitalized for a minimum of 24 h. The patients' eating difficulties were assessed using the Minimal Eating Observational Form (MEOF-II), including observations related to ingestion, deglutition and energy/appetite. Eating difficulties were determined on the basis of one or more components of the MEOF-II. Poor nutritional status was defined as an age-specific low body mass index (BMI), <20 kg/m2 if < 70 years, or <22 kg/m2 if ≥ 70 years. Activity of daily living was assessed using the Barthel-100 Index and defined as low (<50) or high (≥50).

    Results

    A total of 297 geriatric patients were included; the mean age was 83.0 (7.7) years and 56.2% of the patients were female. The prevalence of eating difficulties was 55%. Geriatric patients with eating difficulties had a risk increase of 155% of having poor nutritional status (p = 0.003). Geriatric patients with eating difficulties had a risk increase of 60% of having low activity of daily living (p < 0.001).

    Conclusions

    Eating difficulties were highly prevalent in geriatric patients and were associated with poor nutritional status and reduced activity of daily living. The identification of eating difficulties may be important for nutritional interventions and maintenance or improvement of activities of daily living in the geriatric population

  • 64.
    Nilsson, Maria H.
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Hagell, Peter
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Lund.
    Uncovering indications of the international classification of functioning, disability, and health from the 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire2010In: Parkinson's Disease, ISSN 2090-8083, E-ISSN 2042-0080, p. 984673-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 39-item Parkinson's disease questionnaire (PDQ-39) is the most widely used patient-reported rating scale in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, recent studies have questioned its validity and it is unclear what scores represent. This study explored the possibility of regrouping PDQ-39 items into scales representing the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) components of Body Functions and Structures (BF), Activities and Participation (AP), and Environmental (E) factors. An iterative process using Rasch analysis produced five new items sets, two each for the BF and AP components and one representing E. Four of these were found to represent clinically meaningful variables: Emotional Impairment (BF), Gross Motor Disability (AP), Fine Motor Disability (AP), and Socioattitudinal Environment (E) with acceptable reliability (0.73–0.96) and fit to the Rasch model (total item-trait chi-square, 8.28–33.2; P>.05). These new ICF-based scales offer a means to reanalyze PDQ-39 data from an ICF perspective and to study its health components using a widely available health status questionnaire for people with PD.

  • 65.
    Nyberg, Maria
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Praktisk-estetiska ämnen. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Olsson, Viktoria
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Praktisk-estetiska ämnen. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Pajalic, Zada
    Linnaeus University.
    Örtman, Gerd
    Linnaeus University.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    Linnaeus University.
    Blücher, Anna
    Linnaeus University.
    Wendin, Karin
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Praktisk-estetiska ämnen. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Eating difficulties, nutrition, meal preferences and experiences among elderly: a literature overview from a Scandinavian context2015In: Journal of Food Research, ISSN 1927-0887, E-ISSN 1927-0895, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 22-37Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk of malnutrition increases with ageing, resulting in poorer health and higher risk of disease. Eating difficulties are important risk factors for malnutrition. Moreover, independence in relation to food and meals is highly rated by the elderly and has been associated with health and well-being. The purpose of this literature overview was to provide insights into nutritional status, food choice and preferences as well as the meal situations of home-living elderly (65+) people with motoric eating difficulties focusing on Scandinavia. The overall aim is to support independence and to prevent malnutrition. Nutritional status in the elderly was found to be negatively influenced by motoric eating difficulties including problems with manipulating food on the plate and transporting food to the mouth. Motoric eating difficulties may result in practical simplifications such as use of pre-prepared meals, less advanced cooking, and omission of certain meal constituents in order to avoid e.g. mismanagement and spillage. Eating difficulties are often accompanied by feelings of guilt and shame. Choosing smaller portions, reducing the number of eating episodes and not cooking independently have been associated with a higher risk of malnutrition. The nutritional effects of eating difficulties may be exacerbated by diminished chemosensory functions. Furthermore, both past and present food preferences should be considered in order to meet nutritional needs and meal satisfaction. Development of refined and socially accepted eating aids, in combination with tasty and nutritious products, is important in order to promote healthy and independent living among home-living elderly with motoric eating difficulties.

  • 66.
    Nyberg, Maria
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Mat- och måltidsvetenskap.
    Olsson, Viktoria
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humaniora.
    Örtman, Gerd
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Pajalic, Zada
    Norge.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Blücher, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Lindborg, Ann-Louise
    Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Wendin, Karin
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Mat- och måltidsvetenskap.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    The meal as a performance: food and meal practices beyond health and nutrition2018In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 83-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proportion of elderly people in the population is increasing, presenting a number of new challenges in society. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate how elderly persons with motoric eating difficulties perceive and perform their food and meal practices in everyday life. By using Goffman's concept of performance as a theoretical framework together with Bourdieu's thinking on habitus, a deeper understanding of food and meal practices is obtained. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 elderly people (aged between 67 and 87 years) and meal observations were carried out with 11 of these people. Participants were found to manage food and meal practices by continuously adjusting and adapting to the new conditions arising as a result of eating difficulties. This was displayed by conscious planning of what to eat and when, avoiding certain foods and beverages, using simple eating aids, but also withdrawing socially during the meals. All these adjustments were important in order to be able to demonstrate proper food and meal behaviour, to maintain the façade and to act according to the perceived norms. As well as being a pleasurable event, food and meals were also perceived in terms of being important for maintaining health and as ‘fuel’ where the main purpose is to sustain life. This was strongly connected to the social context and the ability to enjoy food and meals with family members and friends, which appeared to be particularly crucial due to the impending risk of failing the meal performance.

  • 67.
    Olsson, Viktoria
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Resrarch environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Agerhem, Halina
    Ipsos, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Maria
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Resrarch environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Örtman, Gerd
    Linnaeus University.
    Pajalic, Zada
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Svensson, Therése
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Resrarch environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Blücher, Anna
    Linnaeus University.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    Linnaeus University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Wendin, Karin
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Resrarch environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Improved everyday food for home living elderly – perception of protein and energy enrichment2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein-energy malnutrition can be a problem among elderly. A way to increase protein intake may be to enrich home-cooked foods. In this, special attention should be given to that the food is conveniently prepared and well accepted by the target group.

  • 68.
    Olsson, Viktoria
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Mat- och måltidsvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Nyberg, Maria
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Mat- och måltidsvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Pajalic, Zada
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Örtman, Gerd
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Blucher, Anna
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Andersson, Håkan
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Wendin, Karin
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Mat- och måltidsvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Designing meals for elderly with eating difficulties: a cooperative approach2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Approximately 15 % of the Scandinavian population aged 60 and above suffer from eating difficulties with malnutrition as a risk factor. In an effort to improve their possibilities of a healthy and independent living, we have chosen the strategy to develop nutritious and tasty food in combination with functional eating aids to be integrated in the everyday lives of elderly.

    This new, multi-disciplinary project concerns the design of meals for those who experience difficulties in transporting food from the plate to the mouth. The present paper, as part of the project, aims at presenting today’s knowledge of what home-living Scandinavian elderly with pre-oral eating difficulties experience as important factors concerning the meal. The review of peer-reviewed research publications will be complemented with in-depth interviews, surveys and observation studies. Data will be used in a co-designing process, where elderly are involved in developing meals and eating aids that support independence and integrity.

    For elderly in general it is well known that food and drink preferences are affected by past experiences. However, impaired appetite, taste and smell as well as eating difficulties require special adaptations of food and beverages. Serving popular dishes and using distinct flavours and presentations improves meal satisfaction. Elderly suffering from e.g. hand tremor or difficulties in gripping often develop strategies to remain independent, of which one may be to omit meal constituents affecting the sensory and nutritional quality of the meal. Furthermore, the eating situation among people with eating difficulties is often associated with guilt and shame, and social withdrawal is therefore a common scenario.

    Remaining independent in respect to eating is highly valued among elderly. By integrating various dimensions of the meal, including nutritional and sensory aspects, in the development of functional eating aids, the possibility of a healthy and independent living among elderly increases.

  • 69.
    Olsson, Viktoria
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Nyberg, Maria
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Pajalic, Zada
    Linnaeus University.
    Örtman, Gerd
    Linnaeus University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Blücher, Anna
    Linnaeus University.
    Andersson, Håkan
    Linnaeus University.
    Wendin, Karin
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Designing meals for elderly with eating difficulties: a cooperative approach2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Remaining independent in respect to eating is highly valued among elderly. By integrating various dimensions of the meal, including nutritional and sensory aspects, in the development of functional eating aids, the possibility of a healthy and independent living among elderly increases.

  • 70.
    Olsson, Viktoria
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Praktisk-estetiska ämnen.
    Nyberg, Maria
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Praktisk-estetiska ämnen.
    Pajalic, Zada
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Örtman, Gerd
    Linneaus University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Blücher, Anna
    Linneaus University.
    Andersson, Håkan
    Linneaus University.
    Wendin, Karin
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Praktisk-estetiska ämnen.
    Designing meals for elderly with eating difficulties: a cooperative approach2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Siv
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Central Hospital Kristianstad.
    Westergren, Albert
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Central Hospital Kristianstad.
    Functioning and subjective health among stroke survivors after discharge from hospital2006In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 457-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing Activities of Daily Living scales were expanded and found to relate to a participation scale and a subjective health scale. Using these scales in nursing care has the potential to correct current bias towards functions and activities by broadening the focus to include the social as well as the physical.

  • 72.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Persson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    The School of Medical and Health Sciences, Örebro University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Facilitating change, the decision-maker’s views of municipality organized food distribution to elderly people living at home and suggestions for development: a participatory action research study2012In: Public Administration Research, ISSN 1927-517X, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 14-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is the final part of a larger project with an action research approach focusing on food distribution (FD) within municipal service and care for elderly persons, living at home (≥65 years), from various perspectives. The aim was to describe the decision-makers’ the politicians and top level administrative manager’s views on the FD service, and to give feedback from the results of earlier studies based on information given by FD receivers, the perspectives of involved professionals, and the results of an intervention study and further to report the decision-makers suggestions for which areas should be taken into consideration as starting points to improve the FD process and practice. Data was gathered in two steps: step 1, through individual interviews (n=12) with the decision-makers during the spring of 2009, step 2a through feedback from previous studies, received during the autumn of 2011 and step 2b from discussions based on the feedback. The interview data was analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings indicated a discrepancy between the reality and the political visions. It was shown that decision-maker’s needed to make decisions despite their uncertain knowledge of the complexity of the FD programmeThey considered what has been, what is, and will be, when setting goals. Their goal was that elderly person’s rights and needs should be fulfilled. This included freedom of choice and individual consideration. In addition, it meant, meeting elderly people’s medical and social needs. Three areas were found to require facilitation for change related to FD: 1) the monitoring of the elderly’s health and wellbeing while providing FD, 2) the increasing of professional competence, and 3) the creation of a forum for inter-professional communication. The findings in this study have implications for nursing, gerontology and public administration.

  • 73.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Persson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Berggren, Vanja
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    School of Medical and Health Sciences, Örebro University.
    The experiences of elderly people living at home related to their receiving meals distributed by a municipality in Sweden2012In: Journal of Food Research, ISSN 1927-0887, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 68-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to describe the experiences of elderly people, living at home who receive hot meals that are distributed by their municipality. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the (n=13) interviews. The results showed that feelings of dependency, loneliness and gratitude were expressed by the participants in the study related to their meals being delivered home. Dependency was expressed as not having influence over the food products the meals were made from. Loneliness was expressed as being isolated and being confined at home alone due to difficulties getting out of the house, which was associated with the costs of taxis transportation. Gratitude was expressed by the sincere thanks for the possibility of receiving traditional meals delivered daily.

    The major conclusion of the study was the indication that greater attention should be paid to meet both the practical and psychological needs of elderly people.

  • 74.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Persson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    Hälsoakademin Örebro Universitet.
    Evaluation for change, the decision maker’s involvement in the development of food distribution to home living elderly people2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Findings from international research as well as from Sweden show that food distribution as a single inter­vention involves various professional groups on the various levels in organisation.

     

    The present research is one of several Action Research projects initiated as a result of a resolution on the highest political level aiming at achieving improvements within the care and service through collaboration between different levels in the organisations.

     

    The overall aim of this specific study is to describe the “top-down” perspective i.e. decision-makers involvement in identifying areas for the development of the food distribution chain.

     

    Data was collected in two steps, firstly by individual interviews with decision makers (politicians n=21, one administrative manager and one medical responsible nurse) and secondly by evaluation dialogue in group (n=23) discussion. The group discussions were based on findings from individual interviews and results from two previous studies focused on interviews with various professionals and food distribution recipients.

     

    The findings were that food distribution was seen as a multifaceted system that included three interrelated issues: the administration of work, the professional’s competence in nutrition and the relationship between various professional groups. To achieve a change, the central component of complexity needs to be clarified. When the issues are multifaceted the solutions need to regard the whole picture rather than its parts.

  • 75.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Persson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    Hälsoakademin Örebro Universitet.
    Evaluation for change, the decision maker’s involvement in the development of food distribution to home living elderly people2012In: International Conference Interprofessional Partnership: Improvement for Global Health Outcomes Thailand, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Findings from international research as well as fromSwedenshow that food distribution as a single inter­vention involves various professional groups on the various levels in organisation.

     

    The present research is one of several Action Research projects initiated as a result of a resolution on the highest political level aiming at achieving improvements within the care and service through collaboration between different levels in the organisations.

     

    The overall aim of this specific study is to describe the “top-down” perspective i.e. decision-makers involvement in identifying areas for the development of the food distribution chain.

     

    Data was collected in two steps, firstly by individual interviews with decision makers and secondly by group discussions. The group discussions were based on findings from individual interviews and results from two previous studies focused on interviews with various professionals and food distribution recipients.

     

    The findings were that food distribution was seen as a multifaceted system that included three interrelated issues: the administration of work, the professional’s competence in nutrition and the relationship between various professional groups. To achieve a change, the central component of complexity needs to be clarified. When the issues are multifaceted the solutions need to regard the whole picture rather than its parts.

     

    Keywords: action research, decision-makers, food distribution in Swedish context, “top-down” perspective

     

    The short paper and presentation would fit in the key theme Health Care Management of the congress.

     

  • 76.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Persson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University.
    Food distribution within a municipality from different perspectives – older people, decision makers and professionals: an action research study2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present research project is one of Action Research (AR) projects in a region in southern part of Sweden, Scania. All the AR projects originate as result of a decision on the highest political level. The decision was to do changes within the care service where collaboration between different care organisations should be advocated in aim to support and help care consumers. The care should be provided in more care consumer centred ways in which care consumers should be in the centre. These changes should emphasise public and care users’ involvement and participation in decisions around the treatment, service development and evaluation. The participatory service should be performed through a constructive dialogue between care users, health care professionals as a catalyst to common practice change.  The overall aim of the project was to explore FD to older people living alone in their own  homes from different perspectives: elderly as consumers, decision-makers and various professionals.  The specific aims were: 1)to explore various professionals’ experiences in relation to their involvement in food distribution in order to get a comprehensive understanding of the organisation, responsibilities and roles in the specific context (“bottom-up” perspective);

    2) to explore older people’s experiences of food distribution and their suggestions what they whish to change (“bottom-up” perspective); 3) to identify, suggest, implement and evaluate chosen actions issues together with various professionals and elderly people (“bottom-up” perspective); 4) the results from the studies 1-3 will be given as feedback to the decision-makers level and it will be start point for reflective reasoning by using Story Dialogue Method in aim to identify conditions for development of food distribution chain (“top-down” perspective).

     

    The short paper and presentation, on how to identify the practical issues involved and what can be done to create a receptive context for change, would fit in the fourth key theme of the congress.

  • 77.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Persson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    School of Medical and Health Sciences, Örebro University.
    Public home care professionals’ experiences of being involved in food distribution to home-living elderly people in Sweden: a qualitative study with an action research approach2012In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 41-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research focusing on Food Distribution (FD) from various professionals’ and organisational perspectivesare lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to explore various professionals’ experiences of involvement in FD inorder to get comprehensive understanding of the organisation, responsibilities and roles.

    Methods: This qualitative study is a part of a larger project with an action research approach focusing on FD in themunicipal home service and care for home-living elderly persons in a municipality in southern Sweden. The data wascollected through participatory observations (n=90 occasions and in total 480 hours), repeated focus group interviews (n =4) with different professionals (n =10) involved in the FD process and one individual interview. The material was analysedby qualitative manifest and latent content analysis.

    Results: The study indicates that Food Distribution is a fragmentary intervention where a comprehensive perspective andclear roles of responsibility are lacking. The FD organisation seemed to be strictly divided and limited by constraintsregarding time and money. The fragmented organisation led partly to staff only taking responsibility for their part of thechain and no one having the full picture of and responsibility for the FD process, but also to some professionals takingmore responsibility than they were supposed to.

    Conclusions: The aim of the study was met by using an action research approach. The study was however limited by thatno home help officers were represented. The FD appeared as an extremely complex chain of different but connectedactivities. It is not merely the distribution of a product, i.e. the meal box. The fragmentation of FD means that staff onlytakes responsibility for their part of the chain, and that no one has the full picture of or responsibility for the FD process.Consequently, there is a need for an outline of responsibilities. The findings have implications for nursing, gerontology,and in the care for the elderly.

  • 78.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    Hälsoakademin Örebro Universitet.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Persson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    How the professionals can identify needs for improvement and improve food distribution service for the home-living elderly people in Sweden - an action research project2013In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 3, no 8, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Making changes to municipal social care and service has been found to be challenging to realise and highly multifaceted. The aim of this study was to describe how the professionals can identify needs for improvement and improve Food Distribution (FD) service for the home-living elderly people in Sweden.

    Methods: This study is part of a larger project with an action research approach focusing on to municipal FD to older people living in their own home in Sweden. The professionals involved in FD invited the first author to assist them in this process. The study participants were comprised of the following groups: “The Identification focus group” that identified need for improvement of FD (n= 5); “The Action focus group” that planned and choose suitable ‘action’ for improvement (n=5); “The First Evaluation group” (n=4) that evaluated the content of planned improvement and finally “The Second Evaluation group” (n=29) that evaluated the changes following improvement. The data was gathered and analysed by Story Dialogue Method.

    Results: The need to update and increase the FD recipient’s knowledge in nutrition by sending them informative letters was found to be an important area to focus on. The information letters (n=1700) were distributed to the all FD recipients in six municipalities in southern Sweden during April 2011. The results were evaluated during May 2011. The overall general estimation was that the content of the letters indicated that this was a suitable method for gaining information to make a nutrition competence update. Following this, “The Action focus group” decided: firstly, to continue preparing and distributing information letters to all FD recipients to be sent out twice a year, and secondly: to make the information letters accessible on the websites of the six municipalities and county councils involved.

    Conclusions: This study showed that systematic work inspired by an action research approach with motivated and involved participants can be beneficial and a starting point for the process of change in municipal service and care practice. The major conclusion of the study was that systematic reflection over everyday practice can be the vehicle for the future change of practice. The research process and the findings have implications for nursing, care of the elderly and gerontology.

  • 79.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    A Network for Eating and Nutrition as a platform for cooperation over the organisational borders between healthcare sectors in Sweden2014In: Journal of Health Sciences, ISSN 2232-7576, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Requirements to implement scientific knowledge in practice within the Swedish health and social care sectors have increased during the last decades. One of these networks was the Network for Eating and Nutrition that began in 2003. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate how the Network for Eating and Nutrition has functioned during a period of ten years and in what way it has affected work practice.

    Methods: This is a descriptive qualitative study. Data sources for this study were meeting records collected over 10 years and two evaluation surveys (at five and 10 years).  Participants were members of the Network for Eating and Nutrition (n=12 at five years and n=10 at 10 years). The manifest qualitative content analysis was used.

    Results: The Network for Eating and Nutrition was seen as offering support for personal and organisational knowledge development. Further aspects of support from the workplaces of the members and the significance for the work places were described. Further the Network for Eating and Nutrition reached out to care receivers by using specifically tailored education programmes and material. The Network for Eating and Nutrition results and recommendations were described as important references for the development of nutrition routines.

    Conclusion: Networks between organisations with different professional backgrounds can form a basis for knowledge exchange both for focus on the specific topic but also on how to work with quality improvement, i.e. evidence based practice.

  • 80.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Aktionsforskningens grunder2013In: Aktionsforskning i vård och omsorg: tillämpning och teori / [ed] Liselotte Jakobsson, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2013, p. 85-94Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Improvement of food distribution to home living elderly people by using action research approach2012In: Book of abstracts 2012: Nobel Day festivities Örebro University, 2012, p. 33-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study was performed in accordance with action research approach and included four phases: look, think, act and evaluate.

    Look phase was performed in the three steps:

    1. To gain insight into and describe the experiences of elderly home-living people who receive meals from municipality
    2. To explore various professional’s experiences of involvement in the food distribution process in order to get a comprehensive understanding of the organization and responsibilities and roles
    3. To describe decision makers views on the food distribution service

    Think phase was performed in the three steps:

    1. To reflect on what was important for the elderly people relating to their receiving meals distributed by the municipality
    2. To reflect on what the various involved professionals identify as most important to develop in the food distribution chain
    3. To reflect over suggested developmental areas and choose one of them and reflect over how to perform action and evaluation

    Act phase was performed in two steps:

    1. The knowledge in nutrition as developmental area was chosen to focus action on
    2. The way how to develop nutrition knowledge, the information letters,  was chosen
    3. The information letters were developed I collaboration with professionals and elderly people
    4. The 1700 information letters were distributed

    The evaluation phase was performed in three phases:

    1. The preliminary outcomes were given as feedback to involved representatives from various professionals
    2. The finally outcomes were given as feedback to decision makers
    3. Final feedback resulted in three future actions

    Outcomes from look and think phase are:

    1. The food distribution receivers expressed feelings of: to not have influence over food products the meals were made from, to feel isolated and confined at home due to difficulties getting out of the house and expressed sincere gratitude for the meal service from the municipality.
    2. The various professionals expressed that: food distribution is a fragmentary intervention where comprehensive perspective and roles of responsibility are lacking,  the fragmented organization seemed strictly divided and limited by constrains regarding time and money, the necessary observations and structured following up of nutrition status for food distribution receivers is missing,  and that knowledge in nutrition need to be continuously developed.
    3. The decision makers found areas to require facilitation for change related to food distribution: the monitoring of the food distribution receiver’s health and wellbeing, to focus on involved professional’s competence in nutrition and to create a forum for inter-professional communication.
  • 82.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Matdistribution till äldre2013In: Aktionsforskning i vård och omsorg: tillämpning och teori / [ed] Liselotte Jakobsson, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB , 2013, p. 13-32Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Linnaeus University Sweden and Oslo and Akershus University Norway.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Persson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    Hälsoakademin Örebro Universitet.
    Matdistribution från olika perspektiv - professioner, beslutsfattare och från äldre personer - en aktionsforskningsstudie2011Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 84.
    Rolandsson, Sara
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Andersson Sjöland, Annika
    Lund University.
    Brune, Jan C.
    Lund University.
    Li, Hongzhe
    Lund University.
    Kassem, Moustapha
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Mertens, Fredrik
    Lund University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Eriksson, Leif
    Lund University.
    Hansson, Lennart
    Lund University.
    Skog, Ingrid
    Lund University.
    Bjermer, Leif
    Lund University.
    Scheding, Stefan
    Lund University.
    Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla
    Lund University.
    Primary mesenchymal stem cells in human transplanted lungs are CD90/CD105 perivascularly located tissue-resident cells2014In: BMJ Open Respiratory Research, ISSN 2052-4439, Vol. 1, no 1, p. e000027-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have not only been implicated in the development of lung diseases, but they have also been proposed as a future cell-based therapy for lung diseases. However, the cellular identity of the primary MSC in human lung tissues has not yet been reported. This study therefore aimed to identify and characterise the ‘bona fide’ MSC in human lungs and to investigate if the MSC numbers correlate with the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung-transplanted patients. METHODS: Primary lung MSC were directly isolated or culture-derived from central and peripheral transbronchial biopsies of lung-transplanted patients and evaluated using a comprehensive panel of in vitro and in vivo assays. RESULTS: Primary MSC were enriched in the CD90/CD105 mononuclear cell fraction with mesenchymal progenitor frequencies of up to four colony-forming units, fibroblast/100 cells. In situ staining of lung tissues revealed that CD90/CD105 MSCs were located perivascularly. MSC were tissue-resident and exclusively donor lung-derived even in biopsies obtained from patients as long as 16 years after transplantation. Culture-derived mesenchymal stromal cells showed typical in vitro MSC properties; however, xenotransplantation into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice showed that lung MSC readily differentiated into adipocytes and stromal tissues, but lacked significant in vivo bone formation. CONCLUSIONS: These data clearly demonstrate that primary MSC in human lung tissues are not only tissue resident but also tissue-specific. The identification and phenotypic characterisation of primary lung MSC is an important first step in identifying the role of MSC in normal lung physiology and pulmonary diseases.

  • 85.
    Sjödahl Hammarlund, Catharina
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Lund University.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Fall risk and its associated factors among older adults without home help services in a Swedish municipality2016In: Journal of Community Health Nursing, ISSN 0737-0016, E-ISSN 1532-7655, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 181-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During preventive home visits, the purpose of this study was, to identify the prevalence of fall risk and any associated factors. Participants (n=1471) were cognitively sound community-dwelling older adults (≥ 70 years) without home-help service, living in a Swedish municipality. The Downton Fall Risk Index and nine single items were used. Tiredness/fatigue, age ≥ 80, inability to walk one hour, inability to climb stairs and worrying were significantly associated with fall risk. Preventive home visits incorporating fall risk screening proved valuable, providing information for interventions aimed at preventing falls, maintaining independence and facilitating health among community dwelling participants.

  • 86.
    Sjödahl Hammarlund, Catharina
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Lund University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Åström, Ingrid
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education.
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    The Impact of Living with Parkinson’s Disease: Balancing within a Web of Needs and Demands2018In: Parkinson's Disease, ISSN 2090-8083, E-ISSN 2042-0080, Vol. 2018, article id 4598651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the impact of living with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Nineteen persons (11 women) aged 55–84 diagnosed with PD 3–27 years ago participated. Data were collected through semistructured interviews, which were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed by qualitative content analysis. Four categories represented the impact of living with PD: “Changed prerequisites for managing day-to-day demands,” “Loss of identity and dignity,” “Compromised social participation,” and “The use of practical and psychological strategies.” There was a shift from an internal to an external locus of control in managing, control, competence, relatedness, and autonomy. According to self-determination theory, a shift towards extrinsically motivated behaviours may occur when these basic needs are thwarted, leading to compensatory strategies or needs substitutes with negative consequences on health and well-being. We suggest a needs-based approach as an important starting point to better understand the consequences of living with PD and to explore the means for people with PD to acquire an improved quality of life on their own terms. In conclusion, our findings suggest for a shift in focus, from a biomedical to a needs-based approach to understand the impact of living with PD and facilitate more person-centred care and person-centred outcome measurement.

  • 87.
    Smith, Steve
    et al.
    Storbritannien.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Saunders, Julia
    Storbritannien.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Nutritional screening: a user-friendly tool adapted from Sweden2016In: British Journal of Nursing, ISSN 0966-0461, E-ISSN 2052-2819, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 208-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Screening for undernutrition is highly important and may reduce morbidity and mortality. The Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form Version II (MEONF-II) is a nutritional screening tool specifically developed for use by nurses. The authors describe the translation, performance and appropriateness of MEONF-II for the UK. Following translation from Swedish to British English, the user-friendliness and appropriateness of the British MEONF-II was tested by 29 registered nurses and final-year student nurses on 266 hospital inpatients. The new British MEONF-II was perceived as highly user-friendly and appropriate. Assessors found MEONF-II to compare favourably with other similar tools in terms of preference, usefulness and helpfulness in providing good nutritional care. Dependency in activities and poorer subjective health were associated with a higher risk of undernutrition. These findings support the appropriateness of the British MEONF-II version and suggest it may act as a user-friendly facilitator for good nutritional nursing care.

  • 88.
    Stenzelius, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm
    The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Bowel function among people 75+ reporting faecal incontinence in relation to help seeking, dependency and quality of life2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 458-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim was to compare faecal incontinence and related bowel symptoms among men and women and being dependent or not (aged >or=75 years) and furthermore to identify which bowel symptoms predicted help seeking, dependency and low quality of life (QoL). BACKGROUND: Faecal incontinence (FI) in old age is a common condition and influences daily life to a great extent, although few actually seek medical help. METHODS: A total of 248 people with reported difficulties controlling faeces answered a postal questionnaire or were interviewed with questions about FI-related bowel symptoms. A factor analysis resulted in four areas of bowel symptoms and was used in logistic regression with help seeking, dependency and low QoL as dependent variables. RESULTS: Of all the subjects, 56.4% had leakage, 54.7% did not reach the toilet in time, 55.6% had incomplete emptying, 27.9% had hard stool, 36.8% bother from moisture from the anus, 32.2% could not withstand urgency for five minutes and 17% had red skin or wounds in the genital region. Women and those dependent were most affected. Totally 40.8% had sought help and 30.1% used protective aids. Leakage, discomfort, consistency and contractibility symptoms were the categories of bowel symptoms related to FI. Discomfort predicted help seeking (OR 3.0), dependency (OR 1.5) and physical QoL (OR 1.7). Leakage predicted help seeking (OR 1.9) but not dependency and QoL. CONCLUSIONS: Overall bowel function was disturbed among those with FI and unmet needs seem problematic especially for women and those needing help in Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Encouragement to seek and get medical help and to use protective aids may improve the very low quality of life in this group. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Older people with FI should be asked about, assessed for and examined for overall bowel function to get adequate treatment and be encouraged to use protection.

  • 89.
    Stenzelius, Karin
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Mattiasson, Anders
    Lund University.
    Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill
    Lund University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Lund University.
    Symptoms of urinary and faecal incontinence among men and women 75+ in relation to health complaints and quality of life2004In: Neurourology and Urodynamics, ISSN 0733-2467, E-ISSN 1520-6777, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 211-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim was to investigate the prevalence of s elf-reported symptom of urinary, faecal, anddouble incontinence (UI, FI, and DI) in men and women 75þ and to identify how other he althcomplaints and Quality of Life (QoL) relate to incontinence symptoms. Methods: Arandomiseds ample, strati¢ed for age, of eligible men and women from the p opulation were included in the studyand 4,277 out of 8,500 completed a postal questionnaire (61.6% women). The questions focused ondi⁄culties in controlling urine and faeces, other health compl aints, socio-economic background,and social relat ions. Resu lts: Among all respondents 39% reported symptom of UI (more so amongwomen P < 0.001), sympto m of FI in 16.9% (ns between sexes), DI, i.e., a combination of UI and FI,was reported among 14.5% (ns between sexes). Incontinence increased with a ge, and perso ns re port-ing incontinence also had signi¢cantly more of all other health compl aints compared with personswithout incontinence. Those reporting DI comprised an especially vulnerable group. Health com-plaints associated with U I were communicative and mobility problems, other urinary complaints,dizziness, cough, and fati gue. FI was associated with diarrhoea, stomach pain, fatigue, and otherpain. Ris k fa ctors for DI wer e diarrhoea, communication, and mobility problems. Conclu sions: UIand FI were common among elderly men and women and incr eased with age. Furt hermore, incon -tinence was associated with many other co-exis ting health complaints, and the most frail were thosewith DI.

  • 90.
    Stenzelius, Karin
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Lund University.
    Mattiasson, Anders
    Lund University.
    Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill
    Lund University.
    Older women and men with urinary symptoms2006In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 249-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to compare urinary symptoms and their influence on daily life among elderly (75+) women and men in a sample that previously had reported difficulties controlling urine (urine incontinence (UI)) and/or other urinary symptoms (OU). A further aim was to find underlying structures of urinary symptoms and to identify symptomsthat had an impact on seeking medical help and need of help in daily activities (dependency). In total, 771persons (352menand419women) over75 years answered a questionnaire, addressed to those (n = 1881) who in a previous population-based study had reported having symptoms of UIand/orOUusing theBristolFemaleLower UrinaryTractSymptoms(BF-LUTS) questionnaire and International Continence Society male (ICSmale) questionnaire. The groups with UI, OU, women and men reported similar symptoms of frequency, day and night, as well as influence on social life, and avoidance of places and situations due to the urinary symptoms although they differed in storage and voiding symptoms. Feeling incomplete emptying of bladder differed between the UI, OU, and mixed symptoms (MS) groups but not between genders. Of the whole sample, 43.3% had sought medical help.Factoranalysis of similarquestions inBF-LUTSandICSmalequestionnaire resulted inthe factors labeled voiding, storage, pain, frequency, and daily life. Predictors of the urinary symptoms for needing help in daily activities were frequent micturition day and night (OR 3.2) when aged was controlled for. Influence on daily life(OR2.5), storage symptoms(OR2.2), and pain symptoms(OR2.1)predicted seeking medical help. The results show that urinary symptoms are equally bothersome among men and women. There is a need to encourage elderly to seek medical help and to obtain treatment or alleviations for symptoms that give most bother and indicate dependency, such as frequent micturition day and night and difficulties to reach the toilet in time without leakage.

  • 91.
    Stenzelius, Karin
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Lund University.
    Thorneman, Gunilla
    Lund University.
    Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill
    Lund University.
    Patterns of complaints among elderly 75 + relations to quality of life and need of help2005In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 85-102Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Stuhr-Olsson, Gunnel
    et al.
    Findus.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Garpsäter, J
    Dietisternas Riksförbund för Geriatrisk och Gerontologisk Nutrition.
    De svälter i tysthet: ge oss fler dietister2016In: Aftonbladet, ISSN 1103-9000, no 20 novemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 93. Ting, Wang
    et al.
    Hong, Jiang
    Junqiao, Wang
    Jingfang, Liu
    Liang, Wang
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I.
    Eating difficulties in stroke survivors: a systematic review2015In: Journal of Nursing Science, ISSN 2352-0132, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 94-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 94. Ting, Wang
    et al.
    Hong, Jiang
    Junqiao, Wang
    Liang, Wang
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    脑卒中患者进食困难研究进展 [A review of eating difficulties after stroke]2014In: Journal of Nursing Science (护理学杂志), Vol. 29, no 23, p. 83-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [zh]

    从国内外进食困难概述、导致脑卒中患者进食困难的主要因素、进食困难对脑卒中患者的影响、脑卒中患者进食困难的主要评估工具及其护理干预措施等方面进行综述。吞咽障碍并不是脑卒中患者进食方面存在的唯一问题,脑卒中进食困难应有更为广泛的内涵;导致患者进食困难的主要因素包括摄食障碍、咀嚼、吞咽障碍、言语沟通障碍等;进食困难会对患者的生理、心理及日常生活产生影响;进食困难的主要评估工具包括进食障碍评估量表(EDAS)和微型进食观察表(MEOF);可通过他人协助进食、改变体位及改变食物的性状等措施改善患者的进食困难状况。提出应开展探讨我国脑卒中患者进食困难的相关研究。

  • 95.
    Ulander, Kerstin
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Torfadóttir, Òlina
    Axelsson, Carolina
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lindholm, Christina
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Eating and nutrition2007Report (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Vallén, Christina
    et al.
    Central Hospital, Kristianstad.
    Hagell, Peter
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Validity and user-friendliness of the minimal eating observation and nutrition form version II (MEONF II) for undernutrition risk screening2011In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, no 55, p. 5801-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To analyze the criterion-related validity and user-friendliness of the Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form – Version II (MEONF – II) and Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) in relation to the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). In addition, the effect of substituting body mass index (BMI) with calf circumference (CC) was explored for the MEONF-II. Methods The study included 100 patients who were assessed for nutritional status with the MNA (full version), considered here to be the gold standard, and screened with the MUST and the MEONF-II. The MEONF-II includes assessments of involuntary weight loss, BMI (or calf circumference), eating difficulties, and presence of clinical signs of undernutrition. Results The MEONF-II sensitivity (0.73) and specificity (0.88) were acceptable. Sensitivity and specificity for the MUST were 0.57 and 0.93, respectively. Replacing the BMI with CC in the MEONF-II gave similar results (sensitivity 0.68, specificity 0.90). Assessors considered MEONF-II instructions and items to be relevant, easy to understand and complete (100%), and the questions to be relevant (98%). MEONF-II and MUST took 8.8 and 4.7 minutes to complete, respectively, and both were considered relevant and easy to finish. In addition, MEONF-II was thought to reveal problems that allows for nursing interventions. Conclusions The MEONF-II is an easy to use, relatively quick, and sensitive screening tool to assess risk of undernutrition among hospital inpatients, which allows for substituting BMI with CC in situations where measures of patient height and weight cannot be easily obtained. High sensitivity is of primary concern in nutritional screening and the MEONF-II outperforms the MUST in this regard.

  • 97. Vallén, Christina
    et al.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Validity and reliability of minimal eating observation form (MEONF)2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Wang, T.
    et al.
    Kina.
    Jiang, H.
    Kina.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Wang, JK.
    Kina.
    Wang, L.
    Kina.
    The Minimal Eating Observation Form-II (MEOF-II): cross-cultural validation of the Chinese version for people with stroke2016In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 207-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, Aims and Objectives: Eating difficulties are common among patients affected by stroke. A valid, reliable instrument for assessing eating difficulties in people with stroke is needed. The aim of this study was to translate the Minimal Eating Observation Form - version II (MEOF-II) for patients with stroke into Chinese and to comprehensively evaluate its reliability and validity.Methods: The scale of the original MEOF-II form was translated into Chinese using the cross-culture translation method, and 125 participants with stroke were assessed. Data were analysed by content validity index, Cronbach's alpha, correlations and exploratory factor analysis (EFA).Results: Reliability and validity were demonstrated for the scale. A three-factor structure was illustrated by EFA, and construct validity was demonstrated by good convergent and discriminant validity.Conclusions: The Chinese version (Ch-MEOF-II) shows good reliability and validity in this study and can be applicable to assess eating difficulties in people with stroke; The Ch-MEOF-II allows the early recognition of eating difficulties and thus provides guidance of proper clinical interventions. For future study, a confirmatory factor analysis may need to confirm the three-factor structure identified in this study. Furthermore, a cross-cultural comparison can be conducted with the availability of the three different validated language versions of the MEOF-II form.

  • 99.
    Wendin, Karin
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Mat- och måltidsvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Pajalic, Zada
    Örtman, Gerd
    Blücher, Anna
    Andersson, Håkan
    Lindborg, Ann-Louise
    Fogelberg, J
    Borgenstierna, C
    Nyberg, Maria
    Olsson, Viktoria
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Mat- och måltidsvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Mat, Näring och Robotar2014In: Dietistaktuellt, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 18-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 100.
    Wendin, Karin
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Blücher, Anna
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Andersson, Håkan
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Lindén, Maria
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Nyberg, Maria
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Pajalic, Zada
    Norge.
    Olsson, Viktoria
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Örtman, Gerd
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Högberg, Ann-Marie
    Anhörigas Riksförbund.
    Borgstierna, Catharina
    Bestic AB.
    Stuhr Olsson, Gunnel
    Findus AB.
    Toll, Birgitta
    Borås stad.
    Mer krävs för att undvika svält bland äldre2015In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 23 decemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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