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  • 51.
    Hansson, Örjan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Drug calculations in nursing education: is mathematics a problem2018In: Proceedings of the 42nd Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, Umeå, 2018, Vol. 5, p. 244-244Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study concerns the teaching of drug calculations in nursing education. It is part of a larger study and focuses on the first year of a three-year nursing program when the students are introduced to drug calculations. The students who attended the first year on the program was divided into smaller groups. We followed one group where the lecture and problem-solving session was video recorded.It is well known that drug calculations are a critical component in nursing practice. Nurses need to do drug calculations correctly and as part of their nursing education must take a drug calculation test obtaining no errors in the results. However, in spite of drug calculation tests many adverse events occur in nursing practice (e.g., Røykenes & Larsen, 2010). Studies of nursing practice show that mathematics enters practices in a rich variety of ways and that it is not advisable to avoid the complexity of a situation by only using standard methods to capture its visible arithmetic and teach it (Coben & Weeks, 2014). To restrict the teaching to an elementary use of mathematics will not cover all the knowledge that is actually relevant to practice. In routine use, mathe- matical reasoning can be almost invisible and many artefacts in the nursing profession often depends on this invisibility. But at times nurses will need to understand under- lying mathematical models to sort out what is happening or what has gone wrong (Pozzi, Noss & Hoyles, 1998).The results of the current study show that the teaching of first-year students did not support conceptual understanding of mathematics including discussions about mathe- matical reasoning or relevant mathematical concepts. Instead, the students were ad- vised to forget their previous mathematical skills – in particular if they felt insecure about mathematics – and apply “safe” methods with a strong focus on instrumental use. For example, in drug dose calculations a triangular arrangement of dosage (d), concentration (c) and volume (v) was used in relation to the “formula” d=cv, instead of reasoning about how to solve an equation. Discussions about the use of  mathematicsand underlying models were absent in the teaching.

  • 52.
    Hansson, Örjan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Drug calculations in nursing education: is mathematics a problem?2018In: Proceedings of the 42nd conference of the international group for the Psychology of mathematics education / [ed] E. Bergqvist, M. Österholm, C. Granberg & L. Sumpter, 2018, Vol. 5, p. 244-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Hellberg, Lina
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola.
    Thulin, Susanne
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Förskollärares konstruktion av ett fysikaliskt lärandeobjekt2019In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 242-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2010 the Swedish national curriculum was revised and learning goals concerning chemistry and physics were introduced. That has induced a need for further understanding of teaching and learning of specific content in preschool. Focus in this article is how physics content is constructed as an object of learning during preschool teachers’ planning of teaching. The result of a phenomenographic analysis focusing themes of the conversation concerning the intended object of learning reveals a complex process. Occurrences in the activities with the children, available tools at the preschool, the preschool teachers’ perceptions of the mission and understanding of the learning object, contribute to the construction of the learning object. All these aspects are discussed and implications for preschool practice are suggested.

  • 54.
    Holmström, Simon
    et al.
    FontD.
    Pendrill, Ann-Maria
    Nationellt Resurscentrum för Fysik.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Nationellt resurscentrum för fysik, Lunds universitet.
    Reistad, Nina
    Nationellt Resurscentrum för Fysik.
    Gymnasiets laborationsundervisning i fysik: vad påverkar lärares val av laborationer?2019In: LUMAT: Luonnontieteiden, matematiikan ja teknologian opetuksen tutkimus ja käytäntö, ISSN 2323-7104, E-ISSN 2323-7112, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 27-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What factors influence Swedish upper secondary teachers' laboratory teaching in physics? This is an issue raised by the curriculum reform of 2011 in Sweden. In this study, 17 teachers at four different upper secondary schools discussed their laboratory teaching in focus group interviews. Based on an analysis of these interviews, a supplementary survey of 66 teachers was conducted. Logic of events was used as an analytical tool to understand how different factors influence teachers' teaching. The results from the focus groups indicate that teachers appreciate laboratory work that 1) are based on simple equipment, 2) provide good values of constants, 3) laboratory exercises that the students like. In the survey, the syllabus emerged as a stronger factor of influence than in the focus groups – but, the results from both parts indicate that other factors than the syllabus play a larger role for teachers' choice and layout of laboratory work.

  • 55.
    Holmström, Simon
    et al.
    Katedralskolan .
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Lunds universitet.
    Reistad, Nina
    Lunds universitet.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Lunds universitet.
    Gymnasiets laboratorionsundervisning i fysik: mellan tradition och ändrade styrdokument2018In: LUMAT: Luonnontieteiden, matematiikan ja teknologian opetuksen tutkimus ja käytäntö, ISSN 2323-7104, E-ISSN 2323-7112, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiments have a long tradition in physics teaching and there are many examples of classical school experiments. At the same time laboratory teaching is affected by curriculum changes and technological development. In this study experienced teachers at three different upper secondary schools discuss their laboratory teaching. The analysis is based on the logic of events. The study provides insight into factors affecting teachers’ teaching and how classical experiments are adapted and challenged by new conditions. The results indicate that tradition is a stronger factor of influence than policy documents, in particular when very limited time is allowed for professional development.

  • 56.
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    University students’general and specific beliefs about infinity, division by zero and denseness ofthe number line2019In: Nordisk matematikkdidaktikk, NOMAD: [Nordic Studies in Mathematics Education], ISSN 1104-2176, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 69-88Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Juter, Kristina
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Hansson, Örjan
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Upper secondary physics teachers’ views of mathematics2018In: Proceedings of Madif 11, 2018, p. 222-223Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physics teachers at upper secondary school indirectly teach mathematics in their physics classes through their teaching strategies and preferred ways of using mathematics. Their views of physics and mathematics are important for the way they depict mathematics to the students. A web-questionnaire was administered to Swedish physics teachers. Part of the questions investigated views of mathematics, i.e. as a means for application, as a schema, as a formal construct or as processes. Mathematics as a means for application was the dominant opinion. Students’ lack of knowledge in mathematics was regarded as a problem to many of the teachers, and particularly problem solving and modelling. Students’ conceptual and relevance proficiencies in mathematics were less problematical.

  • 58.
    Juter, Kristina
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Wästerlid, Catarina
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education.
    The space between pre-service primary teachers’ first year status and their goals2018In: Proceedings of Madif 11, 2018, p. 222-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ mathematics teacher identity is formed in various settings. A study with 45 pre-service students in their first year of education was conducted as part of alongitudinal study of year 4-6 mathematics teachers’ identity formation, to study the development during their education in terms of mathematical knowledge, pupils’ learning and the teacher role. Questionnaires and interviews were used to collect data. The result shows that many students were reluctant to use mathematics and had conceptions that may mislead pupils. The students’ learning focus was less on pupils’ learning than mathematics and teacher role, but theirideal teacher focused on pupils’ learning.

  • 59.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Att rusta eleverna för gårdagen, nutiden eller framtiden2019In: Skola och samhälle, ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det sägs ibland att vi utbildar eleverna för att vi vill rusta dem för framtiden. Men kan man det, när vi inte vet hur framtiden ser ut? Eller rustar vi snarare för gårdagen? Anders Jönsson ställer frågan om det inte vore bättre att rusta eleverna för nutiden istället.

  • 60.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Bedömningsreformen som kom av sig…2016In: Skola och samhälle, ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 61.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Debatt eller censur?: om kontroversiella frågor i klassrummet2017In: Skola och samhälle, ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 62.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Editorial: Transparency in assessment – exploring the influence of explicit assessment criteria2019In: Frontiers in Education: Assessment, Testing and Applied Measurement, Vol. 3, article id 119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many schools and higher education institutions it has become common practice to shareassessment criteria with students. Sometimes it is required for accountability purposes, at othertimes criteria are used as ameans to communicate expectations to students. Although it is generallyand widely accepted that explicit assessment criteria should be shared with students, challengesto that assumption have been made. On the one hand, research has shown that explicit criteriamay positively affect student performance, reduce their anxiety, as well as support students’ useof self-regulated learning strategies. On the other hand, there are fears that explicit criteria mayhave a restraining influence on students’ learning, as well as limiting their autonomy and creativity.Taken together, the question guiding this Research Topic is when, and under which conditions,transparency in assessment is productive for learning. The contributions to this Research Topicvary from conceptual approaches to more empirical oriented intervention studies.

  • 63.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Formativ bedömning2016In: Utvärdering och bedömning i skolan / [ed] A. Hult & A. Olofsson, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2016, 2, p. 137-152Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 64.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Om evidens och att iscensätta forskningsresultat i klassrummet2019In: Skola och samhälle, ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Diskussionen om evidens tenderar att ramla in i den gamla vanliga ”antingen eller” mentaliteten kring mätbarhet och generaliserbarhet. Anders Jönsson efterlyser en pragmatisk syn på forskning, som utgår från vad som är användbar kunskap, istället för en polariserad uppdelning mellan kvantitativa och kvalitativa data.

  • 65.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Skolans märkliga mätpolitik2017In: Skola och samhälle, ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 66.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Varför är det så svårt att sätta likvärdiga betyg?2018In: Skola och samhälle, ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 67.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Är “grit” kejsarens nya kläder?2017In: Skola och samhälle, ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 68.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Är kriterier bra eller dåliga?2018In: Skola och samhälle, ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 69.
    Jönsson, Anders
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Balan, Andreia
    City of Helsingborg.
    Analytic or holistic: a study of agreement between different grading models2018In: Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, ISSN 1531-7714, E-ISSN 1531-7714, Vol. 23, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on teachers’ grading has shown that there is great variability among teachers regarding both the process and product of grading, resulting in low comparability and issues of inequality when using grades for selection purposes. Despite this situation, not much is known about the merits or disadvantages of different models for grading. In this study, a methodology for comparing two models of grading in terms of (a) agreement between assessors (reliability) and (b) justifications for the grades assigned (validity) was used with a small sample of teachers (n = 24). The design is experimental, with teachers being randomly assigned to two conditions, where they graded the same student performance using either an analytic or a holistic approach. Grades have been compared in terms of agreement and rank correlation, and justifications have been analyzed with content analysis. Findings suggest that the analytic condition yields substantively higher agreement among assessors as compared to the holistic condition (66 versus 46 percent agreement; Cohen's kappa .60 versus .41), as well as higher rank correlation (Spearman's rho .97 versus .94), without any major differences in how the grades were justified. On the contrary, there was a relatively strong consensus among most raters in the sample.

  • 70.
    Jönsson, Anders
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Balan, Andreia
    Effects on student motivation and performance by increased transparency in assessment: EARLI-konferensen2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that sharing explicit assessment criteria with student may positively affect student performance, reduce anxiety, as well as support students’ use of self-regulated learning strategies (Panadero & Jonsson, 2013). Furthermore, it is suggested that students’ motivation for learning is positively affected by their understanding of learning goals and performance criteria (Ellis & Tod, 2015). But there are also indications of students becoming more performance oriented, as opposed to learning oriented, when being provided with explicit assessment criteria. Other fears voiced against the practice of sharing criteria with students is that students may not understand the criteria or that the use of criteria may turn students’ attention away from productive learning towards surface strategies and “criteria compliance” (e.g. Sadler, 2009; Torrance, 2007).    

    Since there is a lack of studies systematically investigating how students are influenced by the use of explicit criteria, it is currently not fully understood under which circumstances it is productive for student learning and motivation to share explicit assessment criteria. Furthermore, there is a lack of studies making a distinction between how students with different goal orientations are affected by the use of explicit criteria. The aim of this study is therefore to investigate the influence of increased transparency in assessment on student motivation and performance, with a specific focus on students’ goal orientations.

    The overall design of this study is an intervention study, where the use of transparency in assessment is increased successively over four teaching sequences. During the first sequence, students are provided with feedback based on criteria, but the criteria are not shared with the students. During the second sequence, students are provided with exemplars, which are chosen to exemplify the criteria. But again, the criteria are not shared with the students. During the third sequence, students are provided with rubrics, which include explicit criteria. Finally, during the fourth sequence, students are provided with both rubrics and exemplars.

    The study uses a complex design, with a total of eight groups of students from four different primary schools (students 12-13 years old; n = 145). On each school, the same teacher teaches two classes of students. During the first sequence, all students are taught the same (science) content and experience the same level of transparency. During the second sequence, all students are also taught the same content, but while the level of transparency is increased for six of the groups, two groups remain on the first level. Similarly, during the third sequence, all students are taught the same content, but the level of transparency is increased for four of the groups, while two remain on the second level and two on the first. Finally, during the fourth sequence, all students are taught the same content, but the level of transparency is increased for two of the groups, while two remain on the third level, two on the second level and two on the first.

    Data collection will be carried out in relation to the four teaching sequences, which are spread over the academic year of 2016-17. For all of the groups, performance tests and motivation questionnaires are distributed before the intervention and after each sequence. The performance tests are composed of items from previous national tests in science, addressing a content similar (but not identical) to the sequence taught. The motivation questionnaire is composed of scales for self-efficacy, performance orientation, and self-regulation (except for one of the self-regulation scales, which has a low alpha value, internal consistency is acceptable for all scales used). There are also shorter questionnaires, with only six items, distributed during each teaching sequence, which target students’ perceptions of transparency.

    Data from performance tests and motivation questionnaires is analyzed with descriptive statistics, as well as with ANOVA based models, in order to track changes within each group, but also to compare between the groups. Analyses will be made with students’ goal orientations both as a dependent variable and as a moderating variable.

    Initial analyses show that:

    1. The correlations between students’ perceptions of transparency and self-efficacy/self-regulation are moderate to strong.
    2. One of the schools in the sample differs significantly from the others with respect to self-efficacy, self-regulation och achievement goals (i.e. means are lower on these scales). Since this is the school that will hold a constant (low) level of transparency during the study, it can be assumed that this observed difference will increase.
    3. Students generally rate their self-efficacy and perception of self-regulation strategies as relatively high (4.72 and 4.53 respectively, on a 6 point scale). Furthermore, according to the pre-test questionnaire students’ ratings on the achievement goals scale is substantially higher (5.38) as compared to the performance goals scale (3.14). If the use of explicit criteria makes students more performance oriented, this relationship is expected to change. According to previous research, ratings on the self-efficacy and self-regulation scales should also be expected to increase.

    Despite the widely spread practice of sharing explicit criteria with students, for instance in the shape of scoring rubrics, few studies have systematically addressed the question of how students are influenced by transparency in assessment. This study therefore have great significance for both future research and educational practice.

  • 71.
    Jönsson, Anders
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Balan, Andreia
    Formative feedback on primary students’ mathematical reasoning2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate the use of an approach, where heuristics for mathematical problem solving is taught by the use of process level formative feedback (Hattie & Timperley, 2007; Shute, 2008). This means that (detailed, domain-specific, and situation-specific) feedback is provided on students’ attempts to solve mathematical problems, so that heuristics are taught not as general rules or in the abstract, and that the feedback only addresses those shortcomings that are identified in the specific situation, to avoid excessive and/or overwhelming information. Such an approach requires, however, that teachers are able to accurately assess students’ solutions, as well as their reasoning, and provide feedback that may aid the students in developing their problem-solving skills. In order to support the teachers, they were provided with a scoring rubric for mathematical reasoning, which could help them in assessing student performance, as well as supporting them in providing future-directed feedback (or “feedforward”) (Panadero & Jonsson, 2013; Smit & Birri, 2017). Specifically, this study investigated: (a) how the teachers provided feedback to the students with the support of a rubric, and (b) how students’ reasoning was affected by this feedback.

  • 72.
    Jönsson, Anders
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Balan, Andreia
    Helsingborg stad.
    Increased explicitness of assessment criteria: effects on student motivation and performance2018In: Frontiers in Education: Assessment, Testing and Applied Measurement, Vol. 3, article id 81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of increased explicitness ofassessment criteria on students’ performance and motivation. Successive levels ofexplicitness, from feedback based on (implicit) criteria to a combination of exemplarsand explicit criteria, were implemented in eight classes at four schools (n = 153 students,12–13 years old) during four teaching sequences in science. Data was collected on: (a)student performance through knowledge tests, (b) student motivation (self-efficacy, goalorientations, and self-regulation) through questionnaires, and (c) perceived clarity of goalsand criteria through “exit tickets.” Findings show that student performance improvedfrom pre-, to post-tests at all schools (effect sizes from 0.82 to 1.38), but not in relationto the level of explicitness. There was also an increase in self-efficacy for low-performingstudents, but, again, not in relation to explicitness. These changes are instead assumedto be an effect of the formative feedback provided as part of the intervention. The onlychange related to the level of explicitness, was an increase in self-regulation scores byhigh-performing students when having access to both exemplars and explicit criteria.Findings therefore suggest that low to medium levels of explicitness in assessment haveno discernable effects on students’ performance or motivation.

  • 73.
    Jönsson, Anders
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Nationellt resurscentrum för fysik, Lunds universitet.
    Formative assessment in higher education –: an example from astronomy2019In: Handbook of Formative Assessment in the Disciplines / [ed] H. L. Andrade, R. E. Bennett, and G. J. Cizek, London & New York, NY: Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter addresses the challenges and potential of implementing formative assessment in higher education with a specific focus on astronomy. We emphasize the use of formative assessment strategies as a coherent whole and a learning environment that encourages student autonomy and divergent thinking.

  • 74.
    Jönsson, Anders
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Formative assessment in higher education: an example from astronomy2019In: Handbook of Formative Assessment in the Disciplines / [ed] H. L. Andrade, R. E. Bennett, & G. J. Cizek, Routledge, 2019, p. 146-169Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter addresses the challenges and potential of implementing formative assessment in higher education with a specific focus on astronomy. We emphasize the use of formative assessment strategies as a coherent whole and a learning environment that encourages student autonomy and divergent thinking.

  • 75.
    Jönsson, Anders
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Holmstedt, Pernilla
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning grundskola, gymnasium och specialpedagogik.
    Aspelin, Jonas
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning grundskola, gymnasium och specialpedagogik.
    Learning to see new things: using criteria to support pre-service teachers’ discernment in the context of teachers’ relational work2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment is a two tier process, where the first stage involves the discernment of distinguishing properties (i.e. criteria) in the performance to be assessed. The second stage involves making a judgment about the quality of the performance, based on the identified criteria. In the context of student self-assessment, this means that students first have to be able to discern the criteria, as they are operationalized in their performance, in order to make a valid judgment of quality. In this paper, we present and discuss findings from a study investigating how the access to explicit criteria affected preservice teachers’ discernment of significant dimensions of quality in teachers’ relational work (i.e. the capacity to create and maintain supportive relationships between teacher and students). Digital video was used as a tool for preservice teachers to analyze classroom interaction focusing on teachers’ relational competency. Data used was preservice teachers’ written analyzes of classroom interactions, simulated through digital video before and after the access to explicit criteria. Findings suggest that the access to explicit criteria positively affected preservice teachers’ capacity to discern significant dimensions of quality in teacher performance, which is evidenced by the quality and focus of their analyzes.

  • 76.
    Jönsson, Anders
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Leden, Lotta
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    The ambiguous influence of high-stakes testing on science teaching in Sweden2019In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tests convey messages about what to teach and how to assess. Bothof these dimensions may either broaden or become more uniformand narrow as a consequence of high-stakes testing. This studyaimed to investigate how Swedish science teachers wereinfluenced by national, high-stakes testing in science, specificallyfocusing on instances where teachers’ pedagogical practices werebroadened and/or narrowed. The research design is qualitativethematic analysis of focus group data, from group discussions withSwedish science teachers. The total sample consists of six teachers,who participated in 12 focus group discussion during threeconsecutive years. Findings suggest that the national testsinfluence teachers’ pedagogical practice by being used as asubstitute for the national curriculum. Since the teachers do notwant their students to fail the tests, they implement new contentthat is introduced by the tests and thereby broaden their existingpractice. However, when this new content is not seen as alegitimate part of teachers’ established teaching traditions, theinterpretation and implementation of this content may replicatethe operationalisations made by the test developers, even thoughthese operationalisations are restricted by demands forstandardisation and reliable scoring. Consequently, the testssimultaneously broaden and narrow teachers’ pedagogical practices.

  • 77.
    Jönsson, Anders
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Lundahl, Christian
    Örebro universitet.
    Klapp, Alli
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Using data in grading: using grades as data2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The practice of grading students’ knowledge is as old as education itself (Lundahl 2006). Yet, it has not been an issue of great concern in teacher education, nor in the educational sciences, until rather recently. This means that current knowledge is limited regarding questions such as how teachers decide upon a grade, the specific competencies needed for grading, the weight assigned by teachers to different aspects of student knowledge, the relationship to official demands on formal grading, and to what degree tradition and/or colleagues affect teachers’ grading. The first part of this presentation is concerned with research on teachers’ grading practices – i.e. the assessment data teachers use when grading – both from a historical and a contemporary perspective. The presentation draws on systematic research reviews and a reading of more than 6,000 peer-reviewed articles on the topic (Hultén, Klapp, Lundahl & Mickwitz 2015, Klapp 2016, Lundahl 2017), as well as on a recent empirical study investigating teachers’ rationales for awarding grades in English. The second part of the presentation reports from an interview study, investigating how grades and assessment data are used as a basis for making decisions about the provision of supplemental support in compulsory school in Sweden. Findings indicate that grades and assessment data are used differently depending on students’ difficulties. This means, for instance, that students with learning difficulties are identified and provided support with greater precision, as compared to students with behavioral or motivational problems.  

     Even if we recognise a growing body of knowledge on teachers’ grading, we also find that the use of grades as data by teachers and schools is basically a white spot on the research map. We have found some indications in the literature that curriculum and assessment-system designs have neglected the perspective of teachers, leading to a de-coupling between professional assessment practice and formal expectations on data use in grading and using grades as data.

  • 78.
    Jönsson, Anders
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Panadero, Ernesto
    Spanien.
    The use of rubrics to support AfL in higher education2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the use of rubrics has shown that rubrics can aid assessors in achieving acceptable levels of consistency when scoring performance tasks. However, by making assessment expectations explicit the use of rubrics has also been shown to promote learning and/or improve instruction. In this contribution we draw on four systematic reviews on the use of rubrics, as well as some other significant publications. From this research we propose and present two different ways in which the transparency provided by rubrics have been shown to support student learning, together with examples of relevant studies. These two ways are through (1) facilitating the understanding and use of feedback and through (2) facilitating students’ self-regulated learning. Based on the same research, we have also sketched recommendations for how to design and use rubrics to support formative-assessment practices. Examples of such recommendations are to use an analytic scoring strategy, several quality levels, task-level specificity and direct criteria, but also to make the rubrics accessible to the students. Furthermore, we have addressed some of the important critique that have been voiced against the use of rubrics, such as the “indeterminacy of criteria”. This paper, however, only focus on the two ways in which the use of rubrics facilitate student learning.

  • 79.
    Jönsson, Anders
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Panadero, Ernesto
    Spanien.
    Juan, Botella
    Spanien.
    Self-assessment, self-regulated learning and self-efficacy: a meta-analysis2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research about student self-assessment (SSA) has shown that academic performancetends to increase for students trained in SSA, but also that SSA training may increasethe use of self-regulated learning (SRL) strategies. Consequently, there is widespreadadvocacy for SSA, not least through the “assessment for learning” reform agenda. The educational gains from SSA are suggested to be related to the enhancement ofownership of learning and use of self-regulatory strategies. In addition, SSA has beensuggested to support students’ self-efficacy (SE). These relationships between SSA andSRL/SE, have been claimed theoretically, but without proper empirical support. Thisstudy therefore uses meta-analytic methodology to explore the relationships betweenSSA and SRL/SE. The 21 studies included in the analysis were found by a databasesearch and meta-analyses were conducted using a random-effect model. Inter-studyvariance was estimated by the maximum likelihood method. The findings from thisstudy confirms the theoretical connection between SSA and SRL/SE. By training inSSA, students’ use of self-regulating strategies for learning increase, while their use ofperformance/avoidance strategies decrease. SSA interventions also support students’ SE(.73), meaning that they have a more adequate perception of their own capabilities. Thefindings also confirm what has been noted in some of the individual studies on theeffects on SRL/SE from SSA interventions that girls tend to benefit more from suchinterventions, at least in relation to SE.

  • 80.
    Jönsson, Anders
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Rietz, Louise
    Lunds universitet.
    Lundström, Mats
    Malmö universitet.
    Students’ use of justifications in socio-scientific argumentation2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims to explore upper secondary school students’ written argumentation regarding a socioscientific issue (SSI). Focus lies on how students justify their claims. The data consists of student texts and was collected at the end of an intervention designed to develop skills related to high quality argumentation.

    SSI has the potential to put science content into a meaningful and relevant context and also to prepare students for life as citizens in a democratic society. Results in studies focusing on students’ use of knowledge and values as support for their claims in argumentative activities show that students tend to base their arguments on values rather than knowledge. Students also have difficulties to construct arguments where claims and evidence connects to one another in a adequate way.

    The intervention took place in a chemistry class in a Swedish upper secondary school. A number of 24 students (age 16-17) from the science-, and technology-major programs participated in the study. The intervention was performed in eight steps during five weeks where the students practiced argumentation in several different ways and studied the issue of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in every-day products. At the end of the intervention, the students had to take a stand in whether they would buy products containing PFAS.

    The results show that after being taught about argumentation and the context surrounding the SSI, the students mainly based their arguments on content knowledge. This applies for both supporting-, and counter arguments. Value justifications are present in the students’ texts, but they constitute a smaller proportion. The justifications in the argumentative texts contain a great breadth of different subject areas, where chemistry knowledge plays an important role. This study shows that subject knowledge can constitute an important part in student argumentation.

  • 81.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Bengtsson, Fredrik
    Helsingborg municipality .
    Björn, Helena
    Lomma municipality.
    Boström, Marja
    Skåne Association of Local Authorities.
    Cole, Scott
    EnviroEconomics Sweden.
    Ersborg, Johanna
    Ecogain AB.
    Franzén, Frida
    Tyréns AB.
    Hasselström, Linus
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Jephson, Therese
    Skåne Association of Local Authorities.
    Lindblom, Erik
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Mellin, Anna
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Pettersson, Ida
    Ecogain AB.
    Scharin, Henrik
    Formas Research Council for Sustainable Development, Sweden..
    Söderqvist, Tore
    Anthesis Enveco AB.
    Environmental compensation as a policy tool in Swedish municipal planning2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the struggle to reach the national environmental policy objectives, environmental compensation has emerged as a possible policy tool that may contribute to achieving the objectives. In Sweden, environmental compensation is legally mandated mainly in cases of exploitation within Natura 2000 areas and nature reserves, which is handled through the Swedish Environmental Code. In contrast, regulatory support is weak when it comes to compensation for impacts arising from municipal development (e.g., housing, schools, hospitals, local roads, etc), even though detailed development planning is required through the Planning and Building Act. Despite this, some municipalities have voluntarily mainstreamed environmental compensation into their planning processes. In the research project ”MuniComp” (2018-2020) we investigate the more progressive use of environmental compensation in planning in two Southern Swedish municipalities, Lomma and Helsingborg (in the province of Skåne). We analyze the models and processes of compensation used, and planning cases where compensation have been applied, in terms of general aspects and criteria for environmental compensation and in light of the constraints of the Swedish legislative context. In the presentation, the compensation models and some of the results from the compensation cases will be presented.

  • 82.
    Klapp, Alli
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Skippa idén om likvärdiga betyg i grundskolan2019In: Dagens nyheter (DN), ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I Sverige lägger vi väldigt mycket tid och pengar på grundskolebetygen, trots att dessa bara är viktiga för ett fåtal elever. I stället borde fokus ligga på gymnasieskolan, där urvalssituationen till högskoleutbildningar är avgörande för en betydligt större andel av eleverna.

  • 83.
    Lauvås, Per
    et al.
    Norge.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Ren formativ bedömning: nn ny bedömningspraktik2019Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kunskapsbedömning kan – kanske mer än något annat man gör som lärare – påverka elevernas kunskapsutveckling och motivation i skolan. Men denna påverkan är inte nödvändigtvis positiv. Bedömningen kan ge kraftigt negativa effekter för elevernas kunskapsutveckling och motivation, såväl som kraftigt positiva. Vilka effekterna blir, beror i stor utsträckning på hur man arbetar med bedömning, inte minst vad gäller relationen mellan formativ och summativ bedömning. Det som börjar bli alltmer tydligt, ju mer vi lär oss om formativ och summativ bedömning, är nämligen att de inte fungerar så väl ihop. En bedömningspraktik där man blandar formativ och summativ bedömning, tycks vara den som ger flest negativa effekter – samtidigt som det troligen är just en sådan bedömningspraktik, som är vanligast i både skola och högre utbildning idag. I den här boken ges därför ett delvis nytt perspektiv på bedömning, vars viktigaste princip är att summativ och formativ bedömning hålls åtskilda i så hög grad som möjligt, så att den formativa bedömningen är ”ren formativ bedömning”.

  • 84.
    Leden, Lotta
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Introducing the human elements of science through a context rich thematic project2019In: / [ed] Fanny Seroglou & Vassilis Koulountzos, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Leden, Lotta
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö universitet.
    The mangle of school science practice: teachers’ negotiations of two nature of science activities at different levels of contextualization2019In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nature of science (NOS) has increasingly been emphasized as an important element in science education. This paper engages in the question of how teachers negotiate different approaches to and contexts for NOS teaching. This exploratory study is part of a three‐year longitudinal project where six in‐service teachers developed and negotiated their NOS‐teaching practices. Pickering's (1995) theory of the mangle of practice is used for the analysis of teachers’ focus‐group discussions. In a mangled practice, school science traditions, policy documents, and students’ and teachers’ expectations and identities are rubbed against each other. As part of the project teachers planned, implemented, and reflected on two NOS activities at different levels of contextualization. The concepts alignment, resistance, and accommodation are used as an analytical tool to understand the processes of the mangle in relation to teachers’ negotiations concerning the two activities during the focus groups. The results of the mangle are presented in relation to a backdrop of three teaching traditions (facts, lab‐work, and discussions) that the teachers’ claim to depart from. The results show how the alignment and resistance of different components of the mangle lead to various accommodations as regards both the activities and the three traditions. The article concludes by discussing how the teachers’ negotiations highlight what becomes possible and what becomes challenging when NOS meets existing traditions, and what this means in respect of possibilities for NOS learning.

  • 86.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Fler nationella prov löser inte bristande likvärdighet i skolan2018In: Skola och samhälle, ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 87.
    Nässen, Nina
    et al.
    Landskrona.
    Nässen, Hans-Ņke
    Landskrona.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Lunds universitet.
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Lunds Universitet.
    Forces on hockey players: vectors, work, energy and angular momentum2019In: European Journal of Physics, ISSN 0143-0807, Vol. 40, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-traditional examples can be very inspiring for students. This paper applies classical mechanics to different ways of skating in ice hockey.
 Skating blades glide easily along the ice in the direction of the blade. Horizontal forces on the skates are thus essentially perpendicular to the blade. Speed skaters glide long distances on each skate before pushing off for the next stride. A hockey player running for the puck may take a number quite short steps in a short explosive rush before shifting to longer strides, where the recurring need to change direction requires additional work by the skater. This paper investigates an alternative stride, with a longer gliding phase in a circular arc, where the centripetal force provided by the ice acting on the skates, changes the direction of motion, without the need for additional energy. In addition, the conservation of angular momentum leads to increased speed as the centre of mass is shifted closer to the centre of the circular arc.
 Finally, we discuss an angular momentum based technique to reverse the direction of motion as fast as possible.

  • 88. Panadero, Ernesto
    et al.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Alqassab, Maryam
    Providing formative peer feedback: What do we know?2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 89. Panadero, Ernesto
    et al.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Alqassab, Maryam
    Providing formative peer feedback: what do we know?2018In: The Cambridge handbook of instructional feedback / [ed] A. Lipnevich & J. K. Smith, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press , 2018, 1, p. 409-431Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Starting from the seminal work of Dewey, Piaget, Vygotsky, and Bruner, peers have been conceptualized as potential mediators in students’ learning and development. In recent decades, there has been an increasing interest in how students’ learning can be fostered through involving them in assessment via self- and peer assessment. Both self- and peer assessment are now well-established fields of research with the following main lines of work: (a) the reliability/validity of self- and peer assessment scores; and (b) the effects of such assessment on students’ learning, which have mostly been studied after the emergence of research on formative assessment. Two more topics that have recently received more interest are: (c) the effects of self- and peer assessment on self-regulated learning and metacognition and (d) the role of psychological and social factors in self- and peer assessment. Consequently, researchers have become interested in the type of information that students exchange in peer assessment situations, with research focused on whether the quality of such information can lead to improved learning compared to just providing a score (i.e., peer scoring). This information is known as peer feedback. There has been an increased interest in peer feedback – a trend reflected in the publication of dissertations that focus on various aspects of peer feedback. The aim of this chapter is to explore the concept of peer feedback, presenting the results of the main dissertations and discussing the key empirical themes that have been investigated.

  • 90.
    Redfors, Andreas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Research Platform Collaboration for Education.
    Fridberg, Marie
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Research Platform Collaboration for Education.
    Jonsson, Agneta
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola. Kristianstad University, Research Platform Collaboration for Education.
    Thulin, Susanne
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola. Kristianstad University, Research Platform Collaboration for Education.
    Chemistry and physics in preschool: teaching and learning through socio-scientific issues2018In: AERA - Online Paper Repository, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on model-based teaching and collaborative inquiry learning of chemical processes and physical phenomena related to socio-scientific issues (SSI) in Swedish preschools (ages 1-5 years). A special focus is children's learning related to intended and enacted objects of learning, and the research discusses teaching and learning processes with and without scaffolding by contemporary information technologies. A developed theoretical framework for analysis of different referential meanings experienced during work with chemistry and physics in preschool will be presented at the conference. Results describe in detail how reasoning and questioning during modelbased teaching and collaborative inquiry learning engage children and preschool teachers. The role of tablet computers, in supporting collaborative learning of chemical processes and physical phenomena related to children's everyday life will be discussed.

  • 91.
    Redfors, Andreas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Research Platform Collaboration for Education.
    Fridberg, Marie
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Jonsson, Agneta
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Arbete i skolan (AiS).
    Thulin, Susanne
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola.
    Early years physics –: teaching with digital support in preschool.2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes an analysis of teaching instances that are part of an in-service preschool teachers programme. The overall aim of the project is – together with teachers – to study model-based teaching and collaborative inquiry learning of chemical processes and physical phenomena in preschool. Our interest is directed towards the teaching of science in preschool, with particular focus on use of digital tools and the verbal communication and intersubjectivity established, or not established, between teachers and children during learning situations in preschool. Teaching activities were jointly developed by work teams in preschools and researchers. A qualitative analysis of video recordings of enacted teaching activities has been performed. The focus was excerpts representing qualitative differences in intersubjectivity related to the object of learning, and what characterised the communication in these situations – the roles of teacher, children and scaffolding digital technology. The focus of this report will be teaching activities developed  with air resistance as the object of learning. The result indicates the importance of intermediary objects of learning and place them on the science teaching agenda indicating that they can constitute a supporting element in the conquest of new knowledge. Further, children’s understanding of abstractions and physics concepts when designing a digital movie about investigated phenomena is discussed. The three-year professional development (PD) programme is ongoing and analysis of several instances during the first and second years will be discussed at the conference.

  • 92.
    Redfors, Andreas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Research Platform Collaboration for Education.
    Fridberg, Marie
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Jonsson, Agneta
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU).
    Thulin, Susanne
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU).
    Intersubjective communication and digitalization in early years chemistry and physics2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes an analysis of teaching instances that are part of an in-service preschool teachers programme. The overall aim of the project is – together with teachers – to study model-based teaching and collaborative inquiry learning of chemical processes and physical phenomena in preschool. Our interest is directed towards the teaching of science in preschool, with particular focus on use of digital tools and the verbal communication and intersubjectivity established, or not established, between teachers and children during learning situations in preschool. A phenomenographic analysis of the enacted object of learning was performed. The focus is excerpts representing qualitative differences in intersubjectivity related to the object of learning and what characterised the communication in these situations – the roles of teacher and children. From our results we state that mutual simultaneity may be seen as a variation of intersubjectivity. The result also places the intermediary object of learning on the science teaching agenda and shows that it can constitute a supporting element in the conquest of new knowledge. Further, children’s understanding of abstractions and concepts when designing a digital movie about science phenomena are discussed. The three-year professional development (PD) programme is ongoing and analysis of several instances during the first years will be discussed at the conference

  • 93.
    Redfors, Andreas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Research Platform Collaboration for Education.
    Fridberg, Marie
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Research Platform Collaboration for Education.
    Jonsson, Agneta
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU). Kristianstad University, Research Platform Collaboration for Education.
    Thulin, Susanne
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU). Kristianstad University, Research Platform Collaboration for Education.
    Physics and tablets in preschool2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on model-based teaching and collaborative inquiry learning of chemical processes and physical phenomena related to socio-scientific issues (SSI) in Swedish preschools (1-5 years). A special focus is children's learning related to intended and enacted teaching, and the research contrasts teaching and learning processes with and without scaffolding by tablets. A developed theoretical framework for analysis of different referential meanings experienced during work with chemistry and physics in preschool will be presented. Results describe in detail how reasoning and questioning during teaching engage children and preschool teachers. The role of tablets in collaborative physics learning will be discussed.

  • 94.
    Redfors, Andreas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Hansson, Örjan
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Reality – theoretical models – mathematics in physics teaching2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Science teaching and particularly chemistry and physics teaching is subject to ongoing discussions concerning aims, goals and relation to modern society, as well as how to teach so that more students find physics interesting and meaningful. The need for further research on reasons why physics teaching is diverse and teaching shows different curriculum emphases have been put forward by several authors (cf. Belo, van Driel, van Veen, & Verloop, 2014; Johansson, Andersson, Salminen-Karlsson, & Elmgren, 2016). The general picture is that relationships between teachers views, curriculum emphases, classroom practices, problems and possible student shortcomings need further studies in order to generate more knowledge about the basis for teaching conditions helping students to gain knowledge and interest in physics.This study continues a line of research that has a special focus on the role of mathematics in physics teaching (cf. Redfors, 2015; 2018; Turşucu, Spandaw, Flipse, & de Vries, 2017). One strand of this research focus on students’ problems in transferring mathematical knowledge to new and applied situations during physics teaching (cf. Kuo, Hull, Gupta, & Elby, 2013). However, there is also research focusing not only problem-solving, but physics teaching in general, from the perspective of the role of mathematics skills among students, since this is viewed as important for physics learning (Angell, Lie, & Rohatgi, 2011; Uhden, Karam, Pietrocola, & Pospiech 2012; Redfors, 2015; 2018). The aim of this three-year study is to further contribute to the understanding of how relations between Reality – Theoretical models – Mathematics are communicated in different kinds of instructional situations (lectures, problem solving and labwork) in Swedish upper-secondary physics. A developed analytical framework from the pilot (Redfors 2015; 2019) is used to focus the analysis of the classroom communication on relations made (by teachers and students) between Reality – Theoretical models – Mathematics. The framework, results from an online survey to Swedish upper-secondary teachers on views of physics, mathematics and physics teaching, and results from classroom studies at upper secondary school during 2018-2019 will be reported and discussed at the conference.

  • 95.
    Redfors, Andreas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Hansson, Örjan
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    The role of mathematics for physics teaching and learning in upper-secondary school2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this three-year study is to further contribute to the understanding of how relations between Reality – Theoretical models – Mathematics are communicated in different kinds of instructional situations (lectures, problem solving and labwork) in Swedish uppersecondary physics. A developed analytical framework from the pilot (Hansson, Hansson, Juter & Redfors 2015) is used to focus the analysis of the classroom communication on relations made (by teachers and students) between Reality – Theoretical models – Mathematics. Results from classroom studies during spring 2018 will be reported and discussed at the conference.

  • 96.
    Redfors, Andreas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Matematikens roll i fysikundervisningen på gymnasiet2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 97.
    Redfors, Andreas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Ryder, Jim
    University of Leeds.
    Introduction: Section 102018In: Research, practice and collaboration in science education / [ed] Finlayson, O., McLoughlin, E., Erduran, S., & Childs, P., Dublin: Dublin City University , 2018, p. 1322-1324Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Svensson, Kim
    et al.
    Nationellt Resurscentrum för Fysik.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Nationellt resurscentrum för fysik, Lunds universitet.
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Nationellt Resurscentrum för Fysik.
    Ouattara, Lassana
    Nationellt Resurscentrum för Fysik.
    Programming as a semiotic system to support physicsstudents’ construction of meaning: A pilot study2018In: ICPE 2018 Proceedings, Johannesburg: ICPE , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Programming as a tool to be used for analysing and exploring physics in an educationalsetting offers an unprecedented opportunity for the students to create and explore their ownsemiotic resources. Students may use programming to create and explore different models ofphysical systems. In this study a small group of upper secondary education students participatedin a workshop where they learned to program physics simulations and to create their own modelsto implement using the programming language Python. Results from the study shows thatupper secondary education students are able to create their own models of physical systemsand implement them into code. The implemented models were models of hanging cloth andheat diffusion. Results were obtained by analysing video and audio recordings of the studentsthrough the lens of social semiotics.

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