hkr.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234 51 - 100 of 154
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Guillemain, Guillemain
    et al.
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Poisbleau, Maud
    Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS, Beauvoir sur Niort.
    Denonfoux, Léopold
    Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS, Beauvoir sur Niort.
    Lepley, Michel
    Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Moreau, Coraline
    Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS, Beauvoir sur Niort.
    Massez, Grégoire
    Association des Amis des Marais du Vigueirat, Mas Thibert, Arles.
    Leray, Gilles
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, Nantes.
    Caizergues, Alain
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, Nantes.
    Arzel, Céline
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Rodrigues, David
    Departamento Florestal, Escola Superior Agrária de Coimbra.
    Fritz, Hervé
    Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS, Beauvoir sur Niort.
    Multiple tests of the effect of nasal saddles on dabbling ducks: combining field and aviary approaches2007In: Bird Study, ISSN 0006-3657, E-ISSN 1944-6705, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 35-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Capsule Nasal saddles have no negative consequences apart from, under some circumstances, a potential bias in social relationships. Aims To test the effect of nasal saddles on Teal Anas crecca, Wigeon A. penelope, Mallard A. platyrhynchos and Pintail A. acuta. Methods The following features were compared between saddled and unsaddled individuals: body mass change of wild Teal between ringing and first live recovery, pairing probability of wild Teal through the winter, wild Teal and Wigeon time-budgets, captive Mallard and Pintail body mass fluctuations, testosterone levels and dominance in the aviary. Results We generally found no significant difference between values for birds with nasal saddles and control birds. Exceptions were for pairing probability, which was lower for marked Teal during one of the winters, and the proportion of aggressive interactions won by Pintail, which decreased after they were fitted with saddles, while this did not happen in Mallard. Conclusions Nasal saddles are an appropriate general method for marking dabbling ducks. However, saddles may not be appropriate for the study of social relationships in some conditions.

  • 52.
    Guillemain, M.
    et al.
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Arzel, C.
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Johnson, A. R.
    Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, le Sambuc, Arles.
    Simon, G.
    Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, le Sambuc, Arles.
    The income–capital breeding dichotomy revisited: late winter body condition is related to breeding success in an income breeder2008In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 150, no 1, p. 172-176Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    et al.
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Arzel, Céline
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Legagneux, Pierre
    Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé - CNRS UPR 1934, Beauvoir-sur-Niort.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Fritz, Hervé
    Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé - CNRS UPR 1934, Beauvoir-sur-Niort.
    Lepley, Michel
    Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Pin, Christophe
    Les Marais du Vigueirat, Mas Thibert, Arles.
    Arnaud, Antoine
    Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Massez, Grégoire
    Les Marais du Vigueirat, Mas Thibert, Arles.
    Predation risk constrains the plasticity of foraging behaviour in teals, Anas crecca: a flyway-level circumannual approach2007In: Animal Behaviour, ISSN 0003-3472, E-ISSN 1095-8282, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 845-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The trade-off foragers make between predation risk and feeding efficiency is readily studied in dabbling ducks, which have stereotyped feeding methods, some of which prevent predator detection while others do not. Teals forage mostly with only the bill submerged (eyes above the water surface) in winter, but use a broader foraging repertoire in summer. Given the different environments used by teals over the year, it is likely that such a shift is due to changes in diet, but it may also be caused by differences in predation risk between habitats. However, neither predation risk nor teal behaviour has been studied with consistent methods around the year or throughout any of its flyways. Covering wintering, spring-staging, breeding and moulting sites, we combined focal observations of teals and predator flyover data from seven regions ranging from southern France to northern Sweden. Although not apparent at the scale of days within sites, teals indeed relied more on shallow foraging where predation risk was higher, i.e. at wintering sites. Average foraging depth increased gradually from September to August, i.e. from wintering to breeding sites. Foraging bout length of deeply foraging teals did not decrease over the year, suggesting that it is through selection of foraging technique, rather than by the balance between foraging and interruptions, that birds adjust to predation risk. This study highlights behavioural plasticity in response to contrasting selection regimes within a flyway, in dabbling ducks as well as long-distance migrants in general.

  • 54.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    et al.
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice , La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Arzel, Céline
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Legagneux, Pierre
    Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS UPR 1934, Beauvoir sur Niort.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Fritz, Hervé
    Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS UPR 1934, Beauvoir sur Niort.
    Lepley, Michel
    Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Pin, Christophe
    Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Arnaud, Antoine
    Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Massez, Grégoire
    Les Marais du Vigueirat, Mas Thibert, Arles.
    Risky foraging leads to cost-free mate guarding in male teal Anas crecca2007In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 148, no 2, p. 251-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mate guarding by males is common in species with long-lasting pair bonds. We tested if the need to guard females affected foraging depth in male teal (Anas crecca), and if they were more vigilant than females when foraging with submerged eyes (preventing monitoring of competing males and predators). These predictions were not supported, suggesting that foraging depth selection is primarily driven by other factors, presumably food related. A likely reason why deeply foraging males did not increase vigilance is that 37.5% of the foraging time was already dedicated to it. The apparent lack of guarding costs in foraging male teal may explain why such small ducks can maintain pair bonds for up to 7 months.

  • 55.
    Gunnarson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Sjöberg, Kjell
    Department of Animal Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Pöysä, Hannu
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Joensuu Game and Fisheries Research.
    Nummi, Petri
    Department of Applied Biology, University of Helsinki.
    Experimental evidence for density-dependent survival in mallard Anas platyrhynchos ducklings2006In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 149, no 2, p. 203-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is unresolved to what extent waterfowl populations are regulated by density-dependent processes. By doing a 2-year crossover perturbation experiment on ten oligotrophic boreal lakes we addressed the hypothesis that breeding output is density dependent. Wing-clipped mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) hens were introduced with their own brood and then monitored for 24 days. Predicted responses were that per capita duckling and hen survival would be lower in high-density than in low-density treatments. Survival was evaluated by model fitting in program MARK. Density, year, and lake were used as main effects, while day after introduction, a weather harshness index, and presence of hens were covariates. Daily survival in ducklings was lower in the high-density treatment, but this effect was year dependent. The highest-ranking model for duckling survival also included a positive effect of duckling age and presence of hens, and a negative effect of harsh weather. Density did not affect female survival although there was a prominent year effect. The highest-ranking model for female survival also included negative effects of day after introduction and harsh weather. This is the first study to report density-dependent survival in experimentally introduced ducklings in a natural setting. Implications for population dynamics and management of harvested populations are far-reaching if such regulation occurs in some years, but not in others.

  • 56.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Richard Ottvall, 2004: Population ecology and management of waders breeding on coastal meadows.2005In: Ornis Svecica, ISSN 1102-6812, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 61-62Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Survival patterns and density-dependent processes in breeding mallards Anas platyrhynchos2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Measuring and assessing vital rates such as births and deaths are prerequisites for understanding population dynamics. Vital rates may be affected by the density of individuals, even though the importance of density dependence on population dynamics has been debated for a long time. The mallard Anas platyrhynchos is one of the foremost game species in the Holarctic, with millions of birds in hunters’ bags annually. Still, basic knowledge about regulation of mallards’ vital rates is poor, and experimental studies on this topic are rare.

    In this thesis I have studied survival patterns and density dependence in mallards breeding in Sweden and Finland. Long-term ringing data from both countries were analysed for mortality patterns and causation, as well as for e.g. survival rate estimation. Most of the studies were, though, experiments run over two years involving manipulations of the density of nests, broods and/or adults, in southern and northern Sweden, comprising different biotic regions. Common response variables were survival of nests, ducklings and hens, mainly analysed with program MARK.

    About 90% of the recovered mallards in Finland and Sweden were hunting kills. However, survival rates were high, ranging from 0.66 to 0.81 for most groups (sex*age). The generality of density dependence was evident since such processes were detected in all studies. Consequently, depredation rate was higher in high nest density compared to low nest density. Survival of ducklings was density-dependent in both boreal and nemoral biotic regions, with food limitation being evident in the former region but not in the latter. In spite of their generality, density-dependent patterns varied within as well between years, and for nest predation rates also between landscape types.

    The findings about density dependence in breeding mallards in this thesis are novel since they are based on experiments. They are potentially of general interest for management because they embrace a variety of lakes in two geographically distant areas, each being representative for large temperate areas in the northern hemisphere. Detection of density dependence at the local scale may be important at larger scales, too, following the principle of ‘ideal preemptive distribution’ in a source-sink dynamic system.

  • 58.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Density-dependent nest predation: an experiment with simulated Mallard nests in contrasting landscapes2008In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 150, no 2, p. 259-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breeding success is a key element of animal population dynamics. In many taxa including birds, nest success, or the proportion of laid clutches that actually hatch, is mainly determined by predation. Previous research gives an inconsistent picture of the prevalence of density-dependent nest predation and one reason for this is the general lack of well-designed replicated experiments. Using simulated Mallard Anas platyrhynchos nests and a crossover design for 20 lakes in the nemoral and boreal biotic zones, we tested the predictions that nest survival is negatively density-dependent and that nest predation is higher in agricultural than in forested landscapes. Study day and daily abundance of waterfowl, other waterbirds, as well as avian predators were included as covariates in the analysis. Model fitting in program mark revealed a general negative effect of nest density on nest survival. In addition, nest survival rate was higher at forest lakes than at lakes in agricultural landscapes, irrespective of nest density. The only covariate producing model improvement was study day; older nests had higher survival rates than recently initiated ones. This is the first replicated lake-level experimental study showing that nest predation is density-dependent in waterfowl. The pattern was consistent between landscape types, implying that density-dependent nest predation may affect habitat choice and population dynamics over large parts of the Mallard's range.

  • 59.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Sjöberg, Kjell
    Department of Animal Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå.
    Pöysä, Hannu
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Joensuu Game and Fisheries Research.
    Nummi, Petri
    Department of Applied Biology, University of Helsinki.
    Why are there so many empty lakes?: food limits survival of mallard ducklings2004In: Canadian Journal of Zoology, ISSN 0008-4301, E-ISSN 1480-3283, Vol. 82, no 11, p. 1698-1703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food is an important factor affecting survival in many bird species, but this relationship has rarely been explored experimentally with respect to reproductive output of precocial birds. In a field experiment we tested the hypothesis that food abundance limits reproductive output in breeding dabbling ducks. Onto 10 oligotrophic lakes in northern Sweden we introduced one wing-clipped female mallard (Anas platyrhynchos L., 1758) and a brood of 10 newly hatched ducklings, and survival was monitored for 24 days. Food was added ad libitum at five of the lakes, but not at the other five. Duckling survival was best modelled to include a treatment effect, with higher survival on lakes with food added, and a negative effect of harsh weather. As expected, duckling survival increased nonlinearly with age. Only one female remained on control lakes after 24 days, whereas four remained on lakes with food added. This is the first experimental demonstration that food may limit survival and reproductive output in breeding precocial birds. We argue that food limitation may be one reason why duckling mortality is high and why many lakes throughout the Holarctic have no breeding dabbling ducks.

  • 60.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Lindahl, Britt
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Apropå Fuglesang: världsbilder och rekryteringen till naturvetenskapliga/tekniska utbildningar2007In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 99-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In connection to the astronaut Christer Fuglesang’s space flight, different stakeholders have expressed a hope that this event will increase the interest among youths for science and technology studies. The modernistic and technique positive discourse that is used is however not unproblematic in this situation. In the article this is exemplified with students’ views concerning the possibility that humans in the future will be able to live on other planets. This is something that, during an interview, was mentioned by Fuglesang as the main reason for space flights.

  • 61.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Physics and the possibility of a religious view of the universe: Swedish upper secondary students' views2007In: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901, Vol. 16, no 3-5, p. 461-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is addressing both upper secondary students’ views of whether it is possible to combine a scientific view of the universe with a religious conviction, and their views of miracles. Students are asked about their own views as well as the views they associate with physics. The study shows that in some cases the students’ own views differ from the views they associate with physics. This we consider to be a possible problem for these students. Through looking at how the students explain the views they associate with physics concerning the issues above, we show that these views are for many of the students intertwined with and linked to other views, that in the students’ views, are part of the worldview of physics. It is common that the students associate scientism with physics. We question whether these kinds of views are necessary for the building of scientific knowledge. Consequences for the teaching and learning of science are discussed.

  • 62.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Swedish upper secondary students' views of the origin and development of the universe2006In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 355-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is addressing how students reason about the origin and development of the universe. Students’ own views as well as their descriptions of physical models are analysed. Data consists of written surveys, and interviews of a subset of the students. Most of the students relate to the Big Bang model when describing the origin of the universe. The study however shows that this can mean different things to the students. The article also addresses views of whether or not the universe changes and of the origin of the elements. When comparing students’ own views with their views of the physics view this study shows that there are students who have a different view of their own than the view they connect with physics. This shows that students, in the area of cosmology, do not necessarily take the view they connect with physics to be their own. Examples of students who handle the physics view in different ways are discussed. There are students who relate not only to science but also to a religious worldview when describing their own view. This shows that when discussing cosmology in class, also a religious worldview can be relevant for parts of the student group.

  • 63.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Tre elever berättar om universum, gud och fysiken2006In: Nordina, ISSN 1504-4556, Vol. 1, no 6, p. 31-43Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Upper secondary students in group discussions about physics and our presuppositions of the world2007In: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901, Vol. 16, no 9-10, p. 1007-1025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we report on a group activity, based on previous work [Hansson & Redfors: 2006b, Science & Education (accepted)], in an upper secondary physics class in Sweden. The aim was to engage students in a discussion about which presuppositions that are really necessary for physics. During the activity the students were to decide about the physics’ view concerning a number of statements. The overall aims of the study were to gain more knowledge about what kind of presuppositions the students associate with physics, and to identify possible ways to address this with students in class. The study shows that it is common for students to associate ‘scientism’ with physics. This is only to some extent problematised and questioned during the discussions. Furthermore we can see that presuppositions necessary for physics are not immediately recognized by the students.

  • 65.
    Hansson, Örjan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Preservice teachers' conceptions of the function concept, its significance in mathematics and presence in school mathematics2005In: Proceedings of NORMA 05, Fourth Nordic Conference on Mathematics Education / [ed] C. Bergsten, B. Grevholm, H. Strømskag Måsøval & F. Rønning, Trondheim, Norway: Tapir Academic Press , 2005, p. 271-285Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Hansson, Örjan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Preservice teachers' views of y=x+5 and y=πx2 expressed through the utilization of concept maps: a study of the concept of function2005In: Proceedings of the 29th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education: vol. 3 / [ed] Chick, H L & Vincent, J L, Melbourne: University of Melbourne , 2005, p. 97-104Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers a group of preservice teachers’ construction of concept maps derived from y=x+5 and y=x2 with emphasis on their conceptual understanding of function. The two statements are perceived to represent a number of different concepts with indications of compartmentalized knowledge structures that might prevent the preservice teachers from building rich conceptual structures. The preservice teachers’ view on the concept of function contrasts with a view where the function concept is a unifying concept in mathematics with a large network of relations to other concepts. Different properties and categorizations of functions are less frequently recognized. In the preservice teachers’ response of drawing concept maps there are signs of metacognitive activity.

  • 67.
    Hansson, Örjan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Preservice teachers' views on the concept of function: a study including the utilization of concept maps2004Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Hansson, Örjan
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Studying the views of preservice teachers on the concept of function2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis consists of an overview of the subject, where in particular five papers are put into a frame. The research conducted for the thesis concerns the views of preservice teachers on the concept of function. Preservice teachers’ conceptions of the function concept are in particular examined in relation to mathematical statements that can be related to different topics on a variety of levels in mathematics; in this research, concept mapping technique is a research tool of interest. Questions concerning preservice teachers’ conceptions of the significance of functions in mathematics, and the presence of functions in school mathematics, are also considered relevant aspects of their views of functions. The final part of the research study includes an intervention study regarding the concept of function, located to a calculus course as one of the concluding courses in mathematics on the educational programme.

    There is a range of findings from the study that is summarized and further discussed in the overview part of the thesis. One result, is that preservice teachers in their reasoning show signs of knowledge compartmentalization which is an issue of concern in their development of conceptual frameworks rich in meaningful connections. This might have consequences for their abilities to operate in a constructivist environment and reason with their students from different points of view. The function concepts’ large network of relations to other concepts is frequently omitted in the preservice teachers’ reasoning. One reason for this is that to preservice teachers, properties of functions seem to be results of isolated procedures, associated with operational conceptions rather than structural conceptions of functions. The findings imply that preservice teachers should encounter functions in a variety of context, to develop their views of the concept of function – including frameworks rich of meaningful relations – and realize that the concept of function is one of the underlying concepts of mathematics, and an important concept to introduce to their future students. The preservice teachers’ reflections concerning functions in school mathematics contribute to emphasize the significance of the process of transformation of subject matter knowledge to pedagogical content knowledge. Further results of the research study, and an outline of the implications, are included in the concluding discussion of the overview part of the thesis.

    The preservice teachers participating in the study are enrolled in a four and a half year teacher preparation program in mathematics and science, grades 4 to 9. The five papers included in the thesis, describe parts of a larger study essentially conducted until the sixth term during the concluding mathematics courses of the program.

  • 69.
    Hansson, Örjan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Grevholm, Barbro
    Agder University.
    Preservice teachers’ conceptions of y=x+5: do they  see a function?2003In: Proceedings of the 27th Conference of the International  Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education held jointly with the  25th Conference of PME-NA: vol. 3 / [ed] N. A. Pateman, B. J. Dougherty, & J. Zilliox (Eds.), Honolulu: University of Hawaii , 2003, p. 25-32Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are studying two groups of preservice teachers’ conceptions, progression and especially the concept of function in connection to y=x+5 when they are taking a course in algebra or one in calculus in their third and sixth term, respectively, in a teacher preparation program. There is a similar development in that they use to a higher degree a numerical interpretation before the course, which decreases after the course with a growth in linear and functional interpretation with the existence of two variables as a large and rather stable category. The group in their sixth term have a slightly more elaborated language and way of looking at y=x+5 than the group in the third term. For a majority of preservice teachers, in both groups, the concept of function is not evoked in connection to y=x+5.

  • 70.
    Hatakka, Ulrica
    et al.
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Åberg, Camilla
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    En utvärdering av temperaturproblem samt närsaltsbelastning i odlingsdammarna och Flugströmmen i Harasjömåla2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    This bachelor’s project deals with both the problems of high water temperatures in fishponds at a fish-breeding station and of the nutrient load to nearby lakes and streams in Harasjömåla, Blekinge, Sweden. Theory, methods and results of the analyses are presented in the report.

  • 71.
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    A study of recurring core developmental features in students’ conceptions of some key ecological processes2004In: Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, ISSN 1492-6156, E-ISSN 1942-4051, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 59-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this 6-year longitudinal study, 24 students were interviewed 11 times, between the ages of 9 and 15, to learn about their understanding of ecological processes. Students were asked about their conceptions of three topics: (a) the conditions for life of plants in a sealed transparent container, (b) the decomposition of leaves on the ground, and (c) the role of flowers in plant reproduction. At ages 15 and 19, the students listened to what they had said about these topics as 11? and 15?year?olds. They were then asked to state how they thought their understanding had developed. The interviews were analysed using principles from Ausubel's (1978) theory of meaningful learning. Characteristic individual themes in the students? conceptions could be followed year by year, especially with respect to their understanding of the cycles in nature. After the students had listened to their earlier interviews, they would often refer to experiences from an early age that they mentioned again and again. The analysis of students? descriptions of themselves as learners also made it possible to discern their different views of learning about ecological processes. In this 6?year longitudinal study, 24 students were interviewed 11 times, between the ages of 9 and 15, to learn about their understanding of ecological processes. Students were asked about their conceptions of three topics: (a) the conditions for life of plants in a sealed transparent container, (b) the decomposition of leaves on the ground, and (c) the role of flowers in plant reproduction. At ages 15 and 19, the students listened to what they had said about these topics as 11? and 15?year?olds. They were then asked to state how they thought their understanding had developed. The interviews were analysed using principles from Ausubel's (1978) theory of meaningful learning. Characteristic individual themes in the students? conceptions could be followed year by year, especially with respect to their understanding of the cycles in nature. After the students had listened to their earlier interviews, they would often refer to experiences from an early age that they mentioned again and again. The analysis of students? descriptions of themselves as learners also made it possible to discern their different views of learning about ecological processes.

  • 72.
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Exploring understandings and responses to science: a program of longitudinal studies2005In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 99-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will report on the development of a research program by a group of science educators at Kristianstad University, which has its roots in a longitudinal study I conducted concerning students’ developing understandings of ecological processes. Following the insights generated in this first study concerning the nature of student understandings, and the potential of the longitudinal design, a research group has developed at Kristianstad which has extended this work into related areas. This paper will describe my own work and its development, and link it with three projects that use a longitudinal design, which we have subsequently undertaken and in some cases completed. The emphasis within the paper will be on the findings generated by these studies on student learning and response to science, and the particular features of the longitudinal design that allow such insights to emerge. The paper will explore patterns of change, and continuity, as a way of appreciating the particular contributions of longitudinal studies.

  • 73.
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Lärande och undervisning i naturvetenskap2001In: Forskningen i skolan, skolan i forskningen: ett möte på lika villkor : dokumentation från forskningssymposium i Malmö 25 januari 2001 / [ed] Andræ Thelin, Annika, Stockholm: Statens skolverket , 2001, p. 28-29Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Personal context and continuity of human thought as recurrent themes in a longitudinal study2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 205-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study of personal context and continuity in 23 students' thinking builds upon data from a longitudinal study of the students' conceptualisations of ecological processes. Each student was interviewed 11 times from age 9-15 about these processes. At the ages of 15 and 19, the students listened to what they said at the age of 11 and 15, respectively, and described how they thought their understanding had developed. The occurrence of charac teristic individual elements in the students' conceptions can be followed as themes in the interviews year by year. The students could, as 15- and 19-year-olds, often reveal concrete experiences from an early age that they referred to repeatedly in the interviews. Even if there was a substantial conceptual development, there was also a very strong element of personal continuity. Conceptions that had developed at an early age seemed to be important for future conceptual development.

  • 75.
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Personal context and continuity of human thought: recurrent themes in a longitudinal study of pupils' understanding of scientific phenomena2001In: Research in science education: past, present, and future / [ed] Helga Behrendt..., Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic , 2001, p. 107-112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study of personal context and continuity in twenty-three pupils' thinking builds upon data from a longitudinal study of pupils' conceptualisations of conditions for life, decomposition and the role of the flower. Each pupil was interviewed eleven times between the age of 9-15. At age 15 and 19, each pupil listened to what they had said four years earlier and described how they thought their understanding had developed. The occurrence of characteristic, individual elements of a content or structural nature can be followed through the interviews, year by year. As 15 and 19-year-olds, the pupils could recognise statements in the interviews as results of experiences from an early age. It is possible to follow a characteristic, individual theme in most of the interviews. Conceptions developed at an early age appeared to be important to future conceptual development. Early introduction of some scientific concepts would help pupils to develop a deeper understanding.

  • 76.
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Students' reflections over their understanding of ecological processes2004In: Learning to change our world?: Swedish research on education & sustainable development / [ed] Per Wickenberg..., Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2004, p. 231-245Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    To develop an understanding of the natural world in the early ages1997In: Growing up with science: developing early understanding of science / [ed] Kjell Härnqvist and Arnold Burgen, London: Jessica Kingsley for Academia Europaea , 1997, p. 186-199Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Helldén, Gustav
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Lindahl, Britt
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Lärande och undervisning i naturvetenskap: en forskningsöversikt2005Book (Other academic)
  • 79.
    Helldén, Gustav
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Solomon, Joan
    The Open University, Milton Keynes.
    The persistence of personal and social themes in context: long- and short-term studies of students' scientific ideas2004In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 88, no 6, p. 885-900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will examine the persistence of “misconceptions.” We used data from a longitudinal study of personal ideas in 24 students' thinking about ecological processes. The results show students often speaking about personal experiences dating from an early age, to which they had also referred in similar interviews conducted years before. These data are compared with results from a different study of middle school physics students' thinking about energy and steam engines. After the new learning had been “successfull” completed and assessed, old ideas returned. These findings are used to set up a theoretical basis for understanding the longitudinal results. Findings from memory studies are shown to explicate the long-term effects of the passage of time and prompts for the recall of scientific concepts.

  • 80.
    Holgersson, Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Children's use of metaphors and analogies while explaining matter transformations. Paper presented at Esera-3, Thessaloniki, August 20012003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Holgersson, Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    How can we describe young children’s arithmetic abilities?2002In: Research and action in mathematics classroom: proceedings of MADIF 2, the 2nd Swedish Mathematics Education Research Seminar, Göteborg, January 26-27, 2000 / [ed] Bergsten, Christer, Dahland, Göte & Grevholm, Barbro, Linköping: Svensk förening för matematikdidaktisk forskning (SMDF) , 2002, p. 329-344Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Holgersson, Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Young children and molecules: examples from a longitudinal study on children’s views of matter. Paper presented at Esera-3, Thessaloniki, August 20012001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report from a longitudinal study of young children’s understanding of matter and its transformations. Interviews have been carried out regularly concerning their conceptions of three different natural phenomena. These conceptions have a personal framing of experiences or idioms that becomes apparent as a result of the longitudinal design. We have also made an early (at the age of 6-7 years) introduction of the concept of molecule. Depending on the phenomenon some of he children in different ways use the molecule as a tool for understanding, while others do not. By focusing on a few examples which we will analyse in detail, we will argue that longitudinal studies can give important information about children’s learning that other kinds of studies do not.

  • 83.
    Holgersson, Ingemar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Lindner, Ann-Charlotte
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Löfgren, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Barns förståelse av materia och dess transformationer2000In: Undervisning i naturvetenskap ur kultur-, teknologi- och miljöperspektiv: rapport från det sjätte nordiska forskarsymposiet om undervisning i naturvetenskap i skolan, Joensuu 12-16 juni 1999 / [ed] Aho, Lerna, Viiri,Jouni, Joensuu: Joensuu universitet, pedagogiska fakulteten , 2000, p. 376-383Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Holgersson, Ingemar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Löfgren, Lena
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    A long-term study of students' explanations of transformations of matter2004In: Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, ISSN 1492-6156, E-ISSN 1942-4051, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 77-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a long-term study of young children's understanding of matter and its transformations. Interviews concerning children's conceptions could be seen in the idioms, personal framings of experiences, that became apparent as a result of the longitudinal design of the study. As part of the project, we also made an early (at the age of 6) introduction ot the concept, molecule. Depending on the phenomenon presented to them for explanation, some of the children used the molecule concept as a tool for understanding and explaining, while others did not. By focusing on a few examples, which we analyse in detail, we argue that long-term studies give rich detail and important information about children's learning that other kinds of study do not.

  • 85.
    Holmberg, Inger
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Hur blir det regn? Så blir det regn!: en studie av lärarstudenters förståelse av och sätt att undervisa om regn2007Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Härnström, Karolina
    et al.
    Department of Marine Ecology, Marine Botany, Göteborg University.
    Godhe, Anna
    Department of Marine Ecology, Marine Botany, Göteborg University.
    Saravanan, V.
    Department of Fishery Microbiology, College of Fisheries, Karnataka Veterinary Animal and Fisheries Sciences University, Mangalore.
    Karunasagar, I.
    Department of Fishery Microbiology, College of Fisheries, Karnataka Veterinary Animal and Fisheries Sciences University, Mangalore.
    Rehnstam-Holm, Ann-Sofi
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Tropical phytoplankton community development in mesocosms inoculated with different life stages2007In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, ISSN 0171-8630, E-ISSN 1616-1599, Vol. 346, p. 75-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many diatom species have the ability to form benthic resting stages, but the importance of these stages as a supply for planktonic blooms is uncertain. A mesocosm study was carried out in December 2005 to January 2006 in Mangalore, India. Mesocosms were inoculated with various combinations of benthic and/or planktonic cells, sampled from the coastal SE Arabian Sea, and the development of the planktonic community was followed. Diatoms dominated the phytoplankton community in all mesocosms, irrespective of inoculum. The most significant differences among inoculum types were altered species composition, and the timings of the maximum cell abundances, which lagged behind in the sediment mesocosms. Populations of Thalassiosira were initiated by both plankton and benthic propagules. Taxa known from temperate coastal areas to seed bloom by benthic propagules, such as Chaetoceros and Skeletonema, were predominantly seeded by planktonic cells in this experiment; this implies differential seeding strategy within the same species at different latitudes. The species assemblage encountered in the plankton and sediment was similar, which indicates that the benthic resting stages seed an autochthonous phytoplankton flora in the area. High species diversity in all inoculated mesocosms was maintained throughout the experimental period, although the actual number of species was fewer at the end. The hydrographic conditions and timing of formation, survival, and germination of diatom resting stages in SE Arabian Sea are discussed.

  • 87.
    Håkansson, Annika
    et al.
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Ingvarsson, Eva
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Persson, Kamilla
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Landsbygdens återkomst - mångsysslare i ny produktion: Löderup och Valleberga socknar om 10 till 15 år2005Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    The essay on ”The revival of the countryside – a multitalent in landproduction.” focuses on local and regional development within agriculture, foodprocessing and tourism.

    Due to great changes in society, the inhabitants in rural areas are forced to find alternative occupations. Using history as a tool to build up the future is a main factor in rural development. Apart from this it involves cooperation, resources, cultural heritage and values, entrepreneurship and innovation, economic vitality, and an understanding of markets and marketing. They all contribute to a region`s ability to benefit from rural development.

  • 88.
    Jakobsson, M.
    et al.
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Genetics, Lund University.
    Säll, T.
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Genetics, Lund University.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Halldén, Christer
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Malmö University Hospital.
    The evolutionary history of the common chloroplast genome of Arabidopsis thaliana and A. suecica2007In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 104-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The evolutionary history of the common chloroplast (cp) genome of the allotetraploid Arabidopsis suecica and its maternal parent A. thaliana was investigated by sequencing 50 fragments of cpDNA, resulting in 98 polymorphic sites. The variation in the A. suecica sample was small, in contrast to that of the A. thaliana sample. The time to the most recent common ancestor (T(MRCA)) of the A. suecica cp genome alone was estimated to be about one 37th of the T(MRCA) of both the A. thaliana and A. suecica cp genomes. This corresponds to A. suecica having a MRCA between 10 000 and 50 000 years ago, suggesting that the entire species originated during, or before, this period of time, although the estimates are sensitive to assumptions made about population size and mutation rate. The data was also consistent with the hypothesis of A. suecica being of single origin. Isolation-by-distance and population structure in A. thaliana depended upon the geographical scale analysed; isolation-by-distance was found to be weak on the global scale but locally pronounced. Within the genealogical cp tree of A. thaliana, there were indications that the root of the A. suecica species is located among accessions of A. thaliana that come primarily from central Europe. Selective neutrality of the cp genome could not be rejected, despite the fact that it contains several completely linked protein-coding genes.

  • 89.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Bioinformatics Program, Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan.
    Hagenblad, Jenny
    Department of Biology, Linköping University.
    Tavaré, Simon
    Molecular and Computational Biology, University of Southern California.
    Säll, Torbjörn
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Genetics, Lund University.
    Halldén, Christer
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Malmö University Hospital.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Nordborg, Magnus
    Molecular and Computational Biology, University of Southern California.
    A unique recent origin of the allotetraploid species Arabidopsis suecica: evidence from nuclear DNA markers2006In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 1217-1231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A coalescent-based method was used to investigate the origins of the allotetraploid Arabidopsis suecica, using 52 nuclear microsatellite loci typed in eight individuals of A. suecica and 14 individuals of its maternal parent Arabidopsis thaliana, and four short fragments of genomic DNA sequenced in a sample of four individuals of A. suecica and in both its parental species A. thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa. All loci were variable in A. thaliana but only 24 of the 52 microsatellite loci and none of the four sequence fragments were variable in A. suecica. We explore a number of possible evolutionary scenarios for A. suecica and conclude that it is likely that A. suecica has a recent, unique origin between 12,000 and 300,000 years ago. The time estimates depend strongly on what is assumed about population growth and rates of mutation. When combined with what is known about the history of glaciations, our results suggest that A. suecica originated south of its present distribution in Sweden and Finland and then migrated north, perhaps in the wake of the retreating ice.

  • 90.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Genetics, Lund University.
    Säll, Torbjörn
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Genetics, Lund University.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Halldén, Christer
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Malmö University Hospital.
    Evolution of chloroplast mononucleotide microsatellites in Arabidopsis thaliana2007In: Theoretical and Applied Genetics, ISSN 0040-5752, E-ISSN 1432-2242, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 223-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The level of variation and the mutation rate were investigated in an empirical study of 244 chloroplast microsatellites in 15 accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana. In contrast to SNP variation, microsatellite variation in the chloroplast was found to be common, although less common than microsatellite variation in the nucleus. No microsatellite variation was found in coding regions of the chloroplast. To evaluate different models of microsatellite evolution as possible explanations for the observed pattern of variation, the length distribution of microsatellites in the published DNA sequence of the A. thaliana chloroplast was subsequently used. By combining information from these two analyses we found that the mode of evolution of the chloroplast mononucleotide microsatellites was best described by a linear relation between repeat length and mutation rate, when the repeat lengths exceeded about 7 bp. This model can readily predict the variation observed in non-coding chloroplast DNA. It was found that the number of uninterrupted repeat units had a large impact on the level of chloroplast microsatellite variation. No other factors investigated-such as the position of a locus within the chromosome, or imperfect repeats-appeared to affect the variability of chloroplast microsatellites. By fitting the slippage models to the Genbank sequence of chromosome 1, we show that the difference between microsatellite variation in the nucleus and the chloroplast is largely due to differences in slippage rate.

  • 91.
    Jeppsson, Charlie
    et al.
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Johansson, Jeanette
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Att ställa krav på interaktiva läromedel2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I dagens samhälle är datorer en naturlig del av vardagen för både vuxna och barn. Datorer och interaktiva läromedel har successivt integrerats i elevernas skolmiljö, men finns framför allt som ett komplement till den traditionella undervisningen. Denna bör rimligen underställas vissa krav för att bland annat målen i läroplanen ska uppnås. Vilka är då de specifika krav som kan ställas på ett interaktivt läromedel för att detta ska anses vara av god kvalitet? Vad är det som motiverar elever i grundskolan att använda sig av dessa läromedel? Hur väl utfaller de krav som utvecklarna har på interaktiva läromedel med de krav som användarna har? Dessa frågeställningar fann vi intressanta att studera och undersöka. Syftet med denna studie är att undersöka om det finns skillnader i krav från användare och utvecklare.

    Det här examensarbetet baseras på litteraturstudier, observationer och intervjuer. Vi har utgått från en kvalitativ forskningsansats i arbetet och de data som samlats in har tolkats och sammanställs här under rubriken Analys. Som studieobjekt har det interaktiva läromedlet Månresan använts med tillåtelse från utvecklaren. Undersökningen genomfördes i skolmiljö och bestod av observationer och intervjuer med berörda elever och lärare. Vi har även genomfört intervjuer med utvecklare av interaktiva läromedel. Dessa olika metoder ger tillsammans en god plattform för att våra frågeställningar ska kunna besvaras och för att syftet med studierna ska uppfyllas.

    Resultatet visar på att det finns förbättringar att göra både under utvecklingsprocessen och när det gäller den faktiska användningen. Vidare ges också ett påpekande om svårigheterna kring kravformulering inom detta område.

  • 92.
    Jonsson, Lars J.
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Agroeca dentigera and Entelecara omissa (Araneae: Liocranidae, Linyphiidae), found in Sweden2005In: Arachnologische Mitteilungen, ISSN 1018-4171, Vol. 29, p. 49-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rare spider species Agroeca dentigera Kulczyński, 1913 (Liocranidae) and Entelecara omissa O. P.-Cambridge,1902 (Linyphiidae), have been found in a small coastal freshwater fen in Lomma (55°42'N 13°4'E),north of Malmö in Scania in southernmost Sweden. A. dentigera was also found on a salt water meadow southof Malmö. Both species have been found only in a few wet localities in Europe. Entelecara depilata Tullgren, 1955,is a junior synonym of Entelecara omissa O. P.-Cambridge, 1902, new synonymy.

  • 93.
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    High achieving students’ conceptions of limits2006In: Proceedings of the Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (30th, Prague, Czech Republic, July 16-21, 2006). Volume 1 / [ed] J. Novotná, H. Moraová, M. Krátká & N. Stehliková, Prague: Charles university , 2006, p. 1:265-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students learning limits of functions perceive and treat limits differently. A study on students’ conceptual development of limits of functions was conducted at a Swedish university (Juter, 2006). The results imply differences in high achieving and low achieving students’ work with limits, but also a lack of differences at some points. The students’ developments and abilities were studied in terms of concept images (Tall & Vinner, 1981) in the sense that their actions, such as problem solving and reasoning, were considered traces of their mental representations of concepts. A concept image of a concept comprises all mental representations of that concept and is linked to related concepts in a web. As could be expected, high achieving students’ abstraction abilities were more developed than other students’. The former group were to a much higher degree than the latter able to link theory to problem solving and explain the meaning of, for example, the limit definition. The students were studied during a semester and there were similarities of the high achieving students’ developments with the historical development of limits that the other students did not reveal. Several similarities were linked to abstraction and formality. Students with positive attitudes to mathematics in general were better limit problem solvers. Most of the high achieving students thought that they had control over the concept of limits, but many of the low achieving students also claimed to have control even if that was not the case. An unjustifiably strong self confidence can prevent students from further work on erroneous or incomplete parts of their concept images. There were no clear patterns of students’ mental representations of limits as exact values or approximations, limits as objects or processes, and limits as attainable or unattainable for functions. Of the 15 students interviewed, only two showed a coherent trace of their concept images. Both students were high achievers. The lack of patterns in all students’ concept images, particularly in the high achievers’, points to the complex nature of limits and the challenge to teach and learn limits.

  • 94.
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Learning limits of functions: university students' development during a basic course in mathematics2003Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Limits of functions as they developed through time and as students learn them today2006In: Mathematical Thinking and Learning, ISSN 1098-6065, E-ISSN 1532-7833, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 407-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares first-year university students' development of the concept of limits to mathematicians' historical development of the concept. The aim was to find out if students perceive the notion as mathematicians of the past did, as understandings of the concept evolved. The results imply that there are some similarities—for example, the struggle with rigor and attainability. Knowledge of such critical areas can be used to improve students' opportunities of learning limits of functions. Some teaching aspects related to the study are also discussed.

  • 96.
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Limits of functions: how do students handle them?2005In: Pythagoras (AMESA), ISSN 1012-2346, E-ISSN 2223-7895, no 61, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Limits of functions: students solving tasks2006In: Australian senior mathematics journal, ISSN 0819-4564, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 15-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted to reveal how students at university level justify their solutions to tasks with various degrees of difficulty. The study is part of a larger study of students' concept formation of limits. The mathematical area is limits of functions. The study was carried out at a Swedish university at the first level of mathematics. The results are, however, applicable to other countries as well since students meet similar challenges in their learning of limits. I have, in discussions with some Australian mathematics teachers at university level, found out that the topics taught in basic mathematics courses in Australia are similar to Swedish courses. Two groups of students taking the same course in successive semesters have been solving tasks. Their solutions are categorised here and analysed to create a picture of how students reason about limits.

  • 98.
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Limits of functions: traces of students' concept images2005In: Nordisk matematikkdidaktikk, ISSN 1104-2176, Vol. 10, no 3-4, p. 65-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students at a Swedish university were subjects in a study about learning limits of functions. The students' perceptions were investigated in terms of traces of concept images through interviews and problem solving. The results imply that most students' foundations were not sufficiently strong for them to understand the concept of limit well enough to be able to form coherent concept images. The traces of the students' concept images reveal confusion about different features of the limit concept.

  • 99.
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Students' attitudes to mathematics and performance in limits of functions2005In: Mathematics Education Research Journal, ISSN 1033-2170, E-ISSN 2211-050X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 91-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this article is to discuss the attitudes to mathematics of students taking a basic mathematics course at a Swedish university, and to explore possible links between how well such students manage to solve tasks about limits of functions and their attitudes. Two groups, each of about a hundred students, were investigated using questionnaires, field notes and interviews. From the results presented a connection can be inferred between students’ attitudes to mathematics and their ability to solve limit tasks. Students with positive attitudes perform better in solving limit problems. The educational implications of these findings are also discussed.

  • 100.
    Juter, Kristina
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Students' conceptions of limits: high achievers versus low achievers2007In: The Montana Mathematics Enthusiast, ISSN 1551-3440, E-ISSN 1551-3440, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 53-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning an advanced mathematical concept, limits of functions in this case, is not a linear development equal for all learners. Intentions and abilities influence students’ learning paths and results. Students’ learning developments of limits were studied in terms of concept images (Tall & Vinner, 1981) in the sense that their actions, such as problem solving and reasoning, were considered traces of their mental representations of concepts. High achievers’ developments were compared to low achievers’ developments to for the duration of a semester to reveal differences and similarities.

1234 51 - 100 of 154
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf