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  • 51.
    Czernekova, Michaela
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Charles University, Prague.
    Tassidis, Helena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Holm, Ingvar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Primary Culture of Tardigrade Storage Cells from Richtersius coronifer Richters, 19032016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coelomocytes are macrophage-like cells in the body cavity or the coelomic spaces of many invertebrates and play major roles in their physiology and immunology. Their structure, function and diversity, however, is still poorly understood.

    Tardigrades are micrometazoans inhabiting a wide variety of environments and with an ability to survive extreme conditions. Coelomocytes (“storage cells”) represent an important part of tardigrade physiology, storing and distributing energy and possibly also having immunological functions. Few studies of tardigrade cell biology have been reported and neither primary nor continuous cell cultures have been established. Tardigrades are normally found and also cultured in an environment rich in microorganisms, some of which may even be of symbiotic value.

    In this study we have tried to establish a primary culture of storage cells in the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer. Different cell media and concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS) were tested. Extracting cells from the tardigrades in an antiseptical environment is challenging since it has to be done under a microscope and contamination from the tardigrades surface is also a problem. To avoid this we tried culturing with high concentrations of antibiotics and antimycotics. We managed to keep the cells viable for up to 18 days in Grace insect medium with 10 % FBS at 20-22°C. The medium was changed every third day. 10x Antibiotic-Antimycotic and 5x of Penicillin-Streptomycin were used to minimize contamination. These concentrations reduce the bacterial abundance, but contamination with fungi was still an issue. Cell morphology evaluation was performed daily and no obvious toxic effects on the cells was observed. Cell viability and cell division were evaluated with Trypan blue staining and cell counting in a haemocytometer. The results indicate that the cells are viable and that some cell division occurs, however more studies need to be performed to confirm this. Still, this study provides the first evidence that primary cultures of storage cells from tardigrades are possible to establish, but the culturing method has to be refined to avoid contamination.

  • 52.
    Dalby, Lars
    et al.
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Christensen, Thomas K.
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Clausen, Preben
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Einarsson, Árni
    Myvatn Research Station, Iceland.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Fox, Anthony D.
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Holmqvist, Niklas
    Swedish Association for Hunting and Wildlife Management, Öster Malma, Nyköping.
    Langendoen, Tom
    Wetlands International, Wageningen.
    Lehikoinen, Aleksi
    Finnish Museum of Natural History, University of Helsinki.
    Lindström, Åke
    Department of Biology,Biodiversity, Lund University.
    Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Trondheim.
    Nilsson, Leif
    Department of Biology, Biodiversity, Lund University.
    Pöysä, Hannu
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Joensuu Game and Fisheries Research.
    Sigfússon, Arnór Þ.
    Verkís, Reykjavik.
    Svenning, Jens-Christian
    Ecoinformatics & Biodiversity Group, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    The status of the Nordic populations of the Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) in a changing world2013In: Ornis Fennica, ISSN 0030-5685, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 2-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dabbling ducks (Anas spp.) are importantmigratory quarry species, protected as a shared resource under international legislation. However, there is a lack of sufficient high-quality data on vital demographic rates and long-term trends in numbers to judge the conservation status of many duck populations at the flyway level. In response to reported declines in the North-West European flyway population of theMallard, we compiled available data on this species in the Nordic countries up to 2010. Generally, national breeding numbers showed increasing trends, wintering abundance showed variable trends, and productivitymeasures indicated stable or increasing trends.Major knowledge gaps were identified, namely the size of hunting bags, the influence of the released Mallards and the role of short-stopping in explaining changing patterns of wintering abundance across the North-West European flyway. Numerically the Nordic breeding population appears in “good condition”, and the wintering numbers have been either stable or increasing in the last two decades. The annual number of releases needs to be determined in order to judge the sustainability of the current levels of exploitation. Overall, none of the indicators showed alarming signs for the Mallard population in the Nordic countries when considered in isolation. However, the widespread decline in wintering numbers elsewhere across North-western Europe requires urgent pan-European action.

  • 53.
    Dessborn, Lisa
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Bidrar gäss och svanar  till övergödning av våtmarker?2018In: Fakta för förvaltare: gäss och svanar: kunskapssammanställning om bete, övergödning, smittspridning och skyddsjakt / [ed] Johan Elmberg & Johan Månsson, Stockholm: Naturvårdsverket , 2018, p. 33-47Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    • Swans and geese occur in larger numbers near more people than ever before, in Sweden as well as in Western Europe.

    • Increasing populations sometimes lead to problems and conflicts. On agricultural land geese and swans can cause costly damage to growing crops. Intense grazing by these birds may also affect natural vegetation, sometimes leading to conflict with conservation and biodiversity goals.

    • Geese and swans are obligate herbivores, consuming leaves, stems, seeds and root parts of terrestrial and aquatic plants.

    • Grazing on growing crops may cause conflicts of interest also when geese and swans congregate in large numbers in wetlands adjacent to cropland.

    • Geese and swans provide a multitude of ecosystem services, for example viewing, hunting, meat, and eco-tourism revenues. GEESE AND SWANS AS VECTORS OF NUTRIENTS

    • Geese and swans eat large amounts of plant material, have a relatively inefficient digestive system, and produce a lot of droppings.

    • These birds find most of their food on land, but spend a large part of the day  resting on wetlands, where they also defecate.

    • In autumn, winter and spring most geese and swans make daily flights between feeding and roost sites, thereby becoming vectors of nutrients to wetlands and lakes

  • 54.
    Dessborn, Lisa
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Englund, Göran
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Arzél, Celine
    Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku.
    Innate responses of mallard ducklings towards aerial, aquatic and terrestrial predators2012In: Behaviour, ISSN 0005-7959, E-ISSN 1568-539X, Vol. 149, no 13-14, p. 1299-1317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reproductive success in ducks is strongly influenced by predation on the breeding grounds. Ducklings are targeted by a range of terrestrial, aerial and aquatic predators, giving a strong selective advantage to individuals and broods that have effective ways to avoid predation. In experiments on naive mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings without an accompanying adult female we investigated the innate ability to identify and avoid threats at varying intensity from aerial, aquatic and terrestrial predators. Ducklings displayed increased vigilance in response to pre-recorded calls of predatory birds, representing a low level of threat. They did not react to visual and olfactory stimuli generated by motionless northern pike (Esox lucius). Neither did they show a strong response to caged American mink (Neovison vison) (visual and olfactory stimuli), although they avoided the area with the mink, indicating a certain level of recognition. High intensity threats were simulated by staging attacks from aerial (goshawk, Accipiter gentilis) and aquatic predators (northern pike). The aerial attack made ducklings dive and scatter under water, whereas the response to attack by pike was to run on the water and scatter in different directions. The lack of response to a ‘passive’ pike and the rather weak avoidance of mink indicate that olfactory cues are not as important in identifying a potential predatory threat by ducklings as are auditory cues. Visual cues appear to be of little importance unless they are combined with movement, and a clear response is only triggered when the intensity of predator threat is high. Mallard ducklings, thus, show an innate capacity to adjust anti-predator behaviour to different predator types and to threat intensity. Our study highlights the general trade-off between foraging needs and predator avoidance, but also second-order trade-offs in which innate avoidance behaviour towards one type of predator may increase predation risk from another.

  • 55.
    Dessborn, Lisa
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Hessel, Rebecca
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Geese as vectors of nitrogen and phosphorus to freshwater systems2016In: INLAND WATERS, ISSN 2044-2041, E-ISSN 2044-205X, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 111-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many goose populations have increased dramatically over the past decades, which may influence inland waters used as roost sites. We reviewed the role of geese in the influx of nitrogen and phosphorus to freshwater systems. Several methods have been used to estimate guanotrophication impacts of geese. Water and sediment analysis have been conducted in areas of high and low geese presence; however, productive wetlands tend to attract more birds, and the causality is therefore ambiguous. Faecal addition experiments have attempted to estimate the impacts of droppings on water chemistry, sediments, algal growth, or invertebrate densities. The most common method of estimating goose guanotrophication is by extrapolation, usually based on multiplication of faecal production and its nutrient content. Based on such studies and those including information about daily migration patterns, we developed an approach to improve estimates of the nutrient contribution of geese. The relative role of geese in wetland eutrophication is also affected by the influx from alternative sources. The greatest guanotrophication impacts are likely found in areas with few alternative nutrient sources and with large goose flocks. Limited inflow and outflow of a freshwater system or a scarcity of wetland roosts may also increase problems at a local scale. Although several studies have looked at the impacts of geese on, for example, water chemistry or soil sediments, the effects are often smaller than expected, in part because no study to date has assessed the ecosystem response by including impacts on all levels, including water nutrient levels, nutrient sedimentation, chlorophyll content, and zooplankton response.

  • 56.
    Dessborn, Lisa
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Rönkä, M
    Arzel, C
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Sinisorsanpoikaset välttelevät synnynnäisesti erityyppisiä petoja2016In: Soumen Riista, ISSN 0355-0656, Vol. 62, p. 43-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Devlin, Yuka
    et al.
    England.
    Nicholl, G
    England.
    McRoberts, C
    England.
    Johnston, C
    England.
    Rosenqvist, Dahn
    Laqua Treatment AB, Sweden,.
    Svensson, Britt-Marie
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Mårtensson, Lennart
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    On site landfill leachate treatment: investigations into economical and environmental sustainable systmes for Northern Ireland2017In: Ebook: Proceedings of 11th European Waste Water Management Conference, 2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the potential for the Swedish Laqua system to be used as a sustainable method for on-site landfill leachate management in Northern Ireland, specifically the potential to use locally sourced filter materials from Northern Ireland as part of the filter system. Four carbon containing ashes and four types of peat were tested over a 24 hours period by a shaking test with untreated landfill leachate. Considering the results of this screening test, and the economical and sustainable supply of filter materials, one combination of ash and peat was selected to be column tested. Column testing with artificial leachate containing 7 organic pollutants (3 PAHs and 4 PCBs) and 9 inorganic pollutants showed that locally sourced filter materials effectively removed both organic and inorganic pollutants. A subsequent column test with landfill leachate for 13 weeks demonstrated it was feasible to apply the Laqua system with economical locally sourced filter materials.

  • 58.
    Djerf, Henric
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Can wetlands reduce humic substances in forested streams: combining two approaches to characterize efficiency2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Djerf, Henric
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Lacoursière, Jean O
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Mårtensson, Lennart
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Can wetlands reduce humic substances in forested streams: combining two approaches to characterize efficiency2018In: Book of abstracts: Linnaeus ECO-TECH '18, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Establishing statistical significance in assessing wetland performance can be quite challenging when reduction in the monitored substance is very small and temporarily variable. Assessing colour changes associated with humic substances is such a situation. One of the most important parameters of any evaluation of wetland treatment performances is the retention time of the water before it exit the wetland. This can be theoretically estimated, but even better measured directly with the help of a tracing agent. In this research, the approach is based on the simultaneously assessment of hydraulic retention time using conservative tracing (Rhodamine WT) and a mass balance based removal efficiency assessment (regression slope of the summation mass-in vs. summation mass-out).

  • 60.
    Ehn Börjesson, Stina-Mina
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Kühn, Inger
    Department of Microbiology, Tumour and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute.
    Hernandez, Jorge
    School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences, Kalmar University.
    Olsen, Björn
    Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Rehnstam-Holm, Ann-Sofi
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Enterococcus spp in wastewater and in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) exposed to wastewater wetland2013In: International Journal of Environmental Protection, ISSN 2226-6437, Vol. 3, no 10, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, twelve Mallards living in an artificial wastewater wetland were exposed to treated wastewater containing 1 x 103- 4 x 103 enterococci 100 ml-1 for a period of 55 days. Faecal samples were collected before, during and after exposure and analysed for Enterococcus spp. The isolates were phenotyped using the PhenePlateTM system. 270 Enterococcus spp. of Mallard origin were analysed, together with 116 Enterococcus spp. isolates from treated wastewater and from incoming raw wastewater. In general, the Mallard and wastewater enterococci isolates belonged to different phenotypes, although several sharing identical phenotypic profiles were found. One E. faecalis phenotype was found in Mallards before, during and after exposure to treated wastewater, as well as in raw and treated wastewater. Our results indicate that there is a common source of enterococci for Mallards and humans. We propose an increased focus on emissions of human bacteria and on systems that mediate their transfer to wild animals.

  • 61.
    Eichholz, Michael W.
    et al.
    USA.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Nest site selection by Holarctic waterfowl: a multi-level review2014In: Wildfowl, ISSN 0954-6324, E-ISSN 2052-6458, no Special Issue 4, p. 86-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because of birds’ mobility, behaviour and many species’ migratory nature, they select repeatedly and spatially among habitats and have been central figures in studies of avian breeding habitat selection during the 20th and 21st centuries. The scientific literature on habitat use by breeding waterfowl has origins dating back to the writings of Charles Darwin in The Voyage of the Beagle, wherein he described the distribution and habitat differences of two species of geese on the Falkland Islands. Since that time, waterfowl ecologists have gone from descriptive studies of nest site characteristics used for planning waterfowl conservation and management to comparing nest site use in relation to potential habitat availability and determining selection for a wide array of ecological correlates. Waterfowl ecologists most recently have been investigating the adaptive significance of nest site selection by associating the latter with individual fitness and demographic measurements to assess the birds’ adaptability under environmental conditions at multiple scales of selection. While little direct assessment of 1st and 2nd order nest site selection has occurred (sensu Johnson 1980), available information is most consistent with the hypothesis that selection at these scales is driven by food availability. At the 3rd and 4th order of selection, data are consistent with hypotheses that both food availability and predator avoidance drive nest site selection, depending on the species and type of nesting aggregation. We also identify understudied areas of nest site selection important for the conservation and management of waterfowl and suggest that the large-scale influence of current anthropogenic and natural effects on the environment indicates that greater emphasis should be directed toward understanding waterfowl nest site selection at the 1st and 2nd orders of selection and how nesting habitat selection interfaces with community ecology of sympatric breeding waterfowl. Moreover, because habitat selection of prefledging waterfowl is inherently linked to breeding habitat selection, we suggest an updated review of brood habitat selection should ensue from our synthesis here.

  • 62.
    Ekelund, Nils
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Lund University.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Palo, Thomas
    Umeå University.
    Wamsler, Christine
    Lund University.
    Implementing the Ecosystem Services Approach at the municipal level: a transdisciplinary project with coastal communities in south Sweden2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden a unique project supported by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency will be developed in close collaboration with coastal municipalities in Skåne, and with a coordinating role by Skåne´s Association of Local Authorities. These municipalities face a range of different environmental challenges, from areas along the eastern coast line facing problems related to the Baltic Sea, to municipalities in the Öresund region. In this study a range of different environmental conditions and related ecosystem services, from vulnerability to floods, erosion and sea level rise to strong pressure on coastal systems from urbanization will be investigated. Research questions and directions are built on cases and scenarios which are a part of the local municipality planning process. The approach will be to study the premises of implementing the Ecosystem Services (ES) in municipal planning and decision making of five coastal municipalities. The present study will analyse past decisions, present planning and future challenges for municipality development and management from the perspective of ES, with the aim of increasing our understanding of the ES concept as a tool for sustainable development. A second aim of the project is to evaluate the potential value of connecting the ES approach to ongoing climate change adaptation in the municipalities. The project will use the six-step approach developed by the Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity framework (TEEB) as the main conceptual frame. This approach includes the following steps: 1) Identifying and agreeing on the problem with stakeholders, 2) Identify the ES which are most relevant and pressing in municipality planning, 3) Collect and identify the information needs and the method to collect the data, 4) Assess expected changes in ES due to decision and input from society, 5) Identify policy options based on changes in ES and 6) Assess social and environmental impacts of 1-5.

  • 63.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Att samsas om gäss - visar Vattenriket vägen?2015In: Vattenriket i fokus, ISSN 1653-9338, no 4, p. 12-15Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    En islom som aldrig kom hem2017In: Anser: Skånes ornitologiska förening, ISSN 0347-9595, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 30-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 65.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Goose poop in the park2018In: Bottom Line Health, ISSN 1092-0129, Vol. 32, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Lever elfenbensnäbben?2013In: Vår fågelvärld, ISSN 0042-2649, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 8-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Nötskrikans vintervanor2012In: Vår fågelvärld, ISSN 0042-2649, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 12-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Rekordmånga lyckade häckningar av vitrygg2018In: Vår fågelvärld, ISSN 0042-2649, Vol. 77, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Arzel, Celine
    Finland.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Holopainen, Sari
    Finland.
    Nummi, Petri
    Finland.
    Pöysä, Hannu
    Finland.
    Sjöberg, Kjell
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Population change in breeding boreal waterbirds in a 25‐year perspective: what characterises winners and losers?2019In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]
    1. Understanding drivers of variation and trends in biodiversity change is a general scientific challenge, but also crucial for conservation and management. Previous research shows that patterns of increase and decrease are not always consistent at different spatial scales, calling for approaches combining the latter. We here explore the idea that functional traits of species may help explaining divergent population trends.
    2. Complementing a previous community level study, we here analyse data about breeding waterbirds on 58 wetlands in boreal Fennoscandia, covering gradients in latitude as well as trophic status. We used linear mixed models to address how change in local abundance over 25 years in 25 waterbird species are associated with life history traits, diet, distribution, breeding phenology, and habitat affinity.
    3. Mean abundance increased in 10 species from 1990/1991 to 2016, whereas it decreased in 15 species. Local population increases were associated with species that are early breeders and have small clutches, an affinity for luxurious wetlands, an herbivorous diet, and a wide breeding range rather than a southern distribution. Local decreases, by contrast, were associated with species having large clutches and invertivorous diet, as well as being late breeders and less confined to luxurious wetlands. The three species occurring on the highest number of wetlands all decreased in mean abundance.
    4. The fact that early breeders have done better than late fits well with previous research about adaptability to climate change, that is, response to earlier springs. We found only limited support for the idea that life history traits are good predictors of wetland level population change. Instead, diet turned out to be a strong candidate for an important driver of population change, as supported by a general decrease of invertivores and a concomitant increase of large herbivores.
    5. In a wider perspective, future research needs to address whether population growth of large‐bodied aquatic herbivores affects abundance of co‐occurring invertivorous species, and if so, if this is due to habitat alteration, or to interference or exploitative competition.
  • 70.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Berg, Charlotte
    Lerner, Henrik
    Sprider gäss och svanar smittsamma sjukdomar?2018In: Fakta för förvaltare: gäss och svanar: kunskapssammanställning om bete, övergödning, smittspridning och skyddsjak / [ed] Johan Elmberg & Johan Månsson, Stockholm: Naturvårdsverket , 2018, p. 49-65Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    • Swans and geese occur in larger numbers near more people than ever before, in Sweden as well as in Western Europe.

    • Increasing populations sometimes lead to problems and conflicts. On agricultural land geese and swans can cause costly damage to growing crops. Intense grazing by these birds may also affect natural vegetation, sometimes leading to conflict with conservation and biodiversity goals.

    • Geese and swans are obligate herbivores, consuming leaves, stems, seeds and  root parts of terrestrial and aquatic plants. • Grazing on growing crops may cause conflicts of interest also when geese and swans congregate in large numbers in wetlands adjacent to cropland.

    • Geese and swans provide a multitude of ecosystem services, for example viewing, hunting, meat, and eco-tourism revenues. GEESE AND SWANS AS VECTORS OF DISEASE

    • A large number of disease agents has been recorded in geese and swans, viz. viruses, bacteria and unicellular parasites. • Some of these have the capacity to infect other bird species and mammals.

    • Geese and swans are highly mobile and often occur close to humans and in our agricultural landscape. As a consequence, they are sometimes suspected of  transmitting disease to livestock and humans

  • 71.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Berg, Charlotte
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Lerner, Henrik
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linneaus University.
    Hessel, Rebecca
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Potential disease transmission from wild geese and swans to livestock, poultry and humans: a review of the scientific literature from a One Health perspective2017In: Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, ISSN 2000-8686, E-ISSN 2000-8686, Vol. 7, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are more herbivorous waterfowl (swans and geese) close to humans, livestock and poultry than ever before. This creates widespread conflict with agriculture and other human interests, but also debate about the role of swans and geese as potential vectors of disease of relevance for human and animal health. Using a One Health perspective, we provide the first comprehensive review of the scientific literature about the most relevant viral, bacterial, and unicellular pathogens occurring in wild geese and swans. Research thus far suggests that these birds may play a role in transmission of avian influenza virus, Salmonella, Campylobacter, and antibiotic resistance. On the other hand, at present there is no evidence that geese and swans play a role in transmission of Newcastle disease, duck plague, West Nile virus, Vibrio, Yersinia, Clostridium, Chlamydophila, and Borrelia. Finally, based on present knowledge it is not possible to say if geese and swans play a role in transmission of Escherichia coli, Pasteurella, Helicobacter, Brachyspira, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Microsporidia. This is largely due to changes in classification and taxonomy, rapid development of identification methods and lack of knowledge about host specificity. Previous research tends to overrate the role of geese and swans as disease vectors; we do not find any evidence that they are significant transmitters to humans or livestock of any of the pathogens considered in this review. Nevertheless, it is wise to keep poultry and livestock separated from small volume waters used by many wild waterfowl, but there is no need to discourage livestock grazing in nature reserves or pastures where geese and swans are present. Under some circumstances it is warranted to discourage swans and geese from using wastewater ponds, drinking water reservoirs, and public beaches. Intensified screening of swans and geese for AIV, West Nile virus and anatid herpesvirus is warranted.

  • 72.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Dessborn, Lisa
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Arzel, Céline
    Andungar har bra koll när faran hotar2014In: Vår fågelvärld, ISSN 0042-2649, Vol. 73, no 3, p. 34-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 73.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Dessborn, Lisa
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Arzel, Céline
    Så undviker andungarna rovdjuren2015In: Svensk jakt, ISSN 0039-6583, Vol. 153, no 6, p. 38-40Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 74.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Green, M.
    Gustafsson, R.
    Haas, F.
    Liljebäck, N.
    Lindström, Å.
    Nilsson, L.
    Ottosson, U.
    Ottvall, R.
    Svensson, M.
    Svensson, S.
    Tjernberg, M.
    Hur många fåglar finns det i verkligheten?2013In: Vår fågelvärld, ISSN 0042-2649, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 58-59Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Svältrisk orsak till att flera västerbottniska sjöar saknar häckande änder2012In: Fåglar i Västerbotten, ISSN 0348-1166, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 10-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 76.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Nummi, Petri
    Pöysä, Hannu
    Sjöberg, Kjell
    Farligt att vara andägg2002In: Svensk jakt, ISSN 0039-6583, Vol. 140, no 10, p. 18-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 77.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Latorre-Margalef, Neus
    Olsen, Björn
    Vart tog fågelinfluensan vägen?2010In: Vår fågelvärld, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 8-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 78.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Hagman, Mattias
    Stockholms universitet.
    Löwenborg, Kristin
    Stockholms universitet.
    Kärvemo, Simon
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Uppsala.
    Snokens barnkammare försvinner2013In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 10-16Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 79.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Hagman, Mattias
    Stockholms universitet.
    Löwenborg, Kristin
    Stockholms universitet.
    Pettersson, Gustav
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Anais, Voisin
    Stockholms universitet.
    Kärvemo, Simon
    Stockholms universitet & Uppsala universistet.
    Movements and habitat choice of resident and translocated adult female grass snakes (natrix natrix) during the egg-laying period2019In: Herpetological Journal, ISSN 0268-0130, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 245-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used externally applied transmitters to study movements of female grass snakes (Natrix natrix) during the egg-laying period in a near-urban landscape in Sweden. Half of the studied snakes were residents while the other half were translocated individuals with no previous experience of the area. As predicted, resident females moved more goal-oriented and shorter distances than did translocated individuals. Habitat use did not differ between resident and translocated snakes; they were typically found in bushes, reeds, and tall vegetation. Habitat preference (use in relation to availability) showed that bushy habitats, tall grassy vegetation and reedbeds were over-used in proportion to availability, whereas forest and open grass lawns were used less than expected based on availability. Our study highlights the importance of preserving and restoring linear habitat components providing shelter and connectivity in conservation of grass snakes. We suggest that externally applied transmitters are a better option than surgically implanted ones in movement studies of grass snakes, and that translocation as a conservation method for snakes has drawbacks.

  • 80.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Hessel, Rebecca
    Fox, Anthony David
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Dalby, Lars
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Interpreting seasonal range shifts in migratory birds: a critical assessment of 'short-stopping' and a suggested terminology2014In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 155, no 3, p. 571-579Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term 'short-stopping' is increasingly used in ecology to describe spatio-temporal changes in occurrence of migratory species. Spurred by the insight that it has been used in a variety of contexts, we reviewed its use in avian ecology. A literature search yielded 59 papers explicitly treating short-stopping in birds, most of them in peer-reviewed journals. The term was first used in 1967 to describe a northward shift in wintering Canada Geese in North America and has been used with increasing frequency to the present day. Geese dominate the short-stopping literature, which is confined to the northern hemisphere. Short-stopping has been used to describe (1) a shortened autumn migration that results in a wintering distribution closer to breeding areas, (2) a shortened spring migration that results in a breeding distribution closer to wintering areas, and (3) a delay in autumn migration that leads to a perceived reduced abundance in some part of the winter range. We advocate that short-stopping should be used only to describe (1) range shifts that involve shortening of the migratory corridor, and that they are qualified explicitly by season (i.e. breeding/winter) and degree (i.e. full or partial range shift). In other cases of breeding, wintering or entire range shifts where the migratory corridor is elongated or remains the same, we recommend using the term 'range shift', qualified by season, geography and orientation (i.e. the direction of the range shift). We also discuss the need for spatially explicit avian count monitoring mechanisms (rather than capture-recapture or hunting bag data) designed specifically to track such changes in distribution in the future.

  • 81.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Hirschfeld, Erik
    Cardoso, Helder
    Diurnal seabird movements at Cabo Carvoeiro (Peniche, Portugal): observations in early October 20122013In: Seabird, ISSN 0267-9310, Vol. 26, p. 24-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ecology and movements of seabirds are still inadequately understood, mainly because they can rarely be studied efficiently from land. The potential of Cabo Carvoeiro (Peniche, Portugal) for monitoring seabird movements from land is poorly known internationally, as few results from this site have been published in English. Here we present data from standardised counts in October 2012 and draw attention to recent organised seabird counts in Portugal. Despite unfavourable weather conditions for concentrating seabirds towards land, we observed a strong passage of Northern Gannet   Morus bassanus, Cory’s Shearwater Calonectris diomedea, Great Skua  Stercorarius skua, and Balearic Shearwater Puffinus mauretanicus (mean morning passage of 252, 99, 19, and 21 birds / hour, respectively). Manx Shearwater Puffinus puffinus, Sooty Shearwater P. griseus and Great Shearwater P. gravis occurred regularly in low numbers. Extrapolation indicates that thousands of seabirds passed daily within a few kilometres from land. The high counts of some species and the fairly high species diversity observed by us and in the RAM (Rede de observação de Aves e Mamiferos marinhos) initiative show that Cabo Carvoeiro is an outstanding site for monitoring and studying seabirds in the eastern Atlantic, as it is also located further south in the flyway than most other seawatch points. We hope this note will inspire ornithologists from other countries to participate in standardised seabird counts at Cabo Carvoeiro and other Portuguese sites.

  • 82.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Hirschfeld, Erik
    Cardoso, Helder
    Portugal.
    Hessel, Rebecca
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Passage patterns of seabirds in October at Cabo Carvoeiro Portugal, with special reference to the Balearic Shearwater Puffinus mauretanicus2016In: Marine Ornithology, ISSN 1018-3337, E-ISSN 2074-1235, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 151-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Land-based counts of migrating seabirds remain essential to increase knowledge about their numbers and movements. To assess the value of Cabo Carvoeiro (Peniche, Portugal) as a monitoring site in the East Atlantic, we studied seabird species composition, passage patterns and flock size during mid-October 2014. During standardized counts, we observed nearly 8 000 seabirds of 17 species. The ratio of individuals passing in a southerly to southwesterly direction was >96% in all species, showing that genuine migrants were counted. The passage rate (birds/hour) was higher for Northern Gannets Morus bassanus than for any other species, by a factor of approximately 50 (morning mean 906/h, afternoon mean 1 153/h). The globally endangered Balearic Shearwaters Puffinus mauretanicus, Great Skuas Stercorarius skua and Pomarine Skuas S. pomarinus had passage rates of 10–25/h. Flock size distribution in the 11 most numerous species showed that most migrated singly or in groups of two. Flock size was larger in Balearic Shearwaters than in both Cory’s Calonectris borealis and Manx Shearwaters P. puffinus. Among skuas, flock size was larger in Pomarine than in Great Skuas. The passage rate of Manx Shearwaters was positively correlated with that of Northern Gannets, Great Skuas and Sandwich Terns Sterna sandvicensis. Northern Gannets showed a positive co-variation with Pomarine Skuas. Balearic and Sooty Shearwaters Ardenna griseus were the only species that did not show any significant co-variation with another species. Morning and afternoon passage rates did not differ significantly in any of the six most numerous species (Northern Gannets, Cory’s and Balearic Shearwaters, Great and Pomarine Skuas, and Sandwich Terns), or in Sooty Shearwaters (less numerous). Thus, the passage rates at Cabo Carvoeiro in October of Balearic Shearwaters and five other species were as high or higher than those reported from any other seawatch in Portugal, indicating the international value of seabird monitoring at Cabo Carvoeiro during the autumn migration.

  • 83.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Månsson, JohanSveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Fakta för förvaltare: gäss och svanar: kunskapssammanställning om bete, övergödning, smittspridning och skyddsjakt2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    GÄSSEN I SVERIGE blir allt fler. De flesta gåsarter ökar i antal och med växande populationer ökar också konflikterna mellan samhällsintressen och människor som berörs av gässen. Ändrade flyttningsmönster är ett annat exempel på hur  förutsättningarna för förvaltningen av gäss och svanar påverkas. I den strategi för svensk viltförvaltning som Naturvårdsverket har tagit fram betonas en förvaltning byggd på kvalitetssäkrad kunskap och förvaltningen av gäss är ett bra exempel på vikten av aktuell kunskap när omständigheterna förändras. Viltstrategin beskriver de vägval som Naturvårdsverket avser att genomföra för att utveckla och stärka Sveriges viltförvaltning fram till år 2020. Bland annat ska arbetet med att förebygga skador och andra problem som vilt orsakar utvecklas, tillsammans med övriga berörda organisationer. Strategin betonar också att svensk viltförvaltning ska bygga på den bästa tillgängliga kunskapen och att Naturvårdsverket har ett stort ansvar för att se till att aktuell kunskap kommer till användning. Forskarna Johan Elmberg och Johan Månsson har på uppdrag av Naturvårdsverkets vetenskapliga kommitté för viltforskning gjort en litteraturöversikt om befintlig kunskap om gäss och om framtida kunskapsbehov. Kunskapssammanställningen ligger också till grund för ett större gåsforskningsprojekt under ledning av Johan Elmberg och Johan Månsson, med start 2017. I Naturvårdsverkets arbete med att ta fram vetenskapligt underlag till stöd för viltförvaltningen är gåsprojektet en viktig pusselbit som är tänkt att under de kommande åren kunna ge ytterligare kunskap till en gåsförvaltning i förändring. Författarna svarar ensamma för rapportens innehåll, slutsatser och rekommendationer

  • 84.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Olsson, Camilla
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Månsson, Johan
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Gäss i jordbrukslandskapet: utmaningar och möjligheter2018In: Man and biosphere health: en komplett akademisk miljö / [ed] A-S Rehnstam-Holm, Kristianstad: Högskolan Kristianstad , 2018, p. 34-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Olsson, Camilla
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Månsson, Johan
    SLU/Grimsö.
    Liljebäck, Niklas
    Svenska Jägareförbundet.
    Gäss: ny kunskap krävs2017In: Vår fågelvärld, ISSN 0042-2649, no 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    "Dum som en gås" är ett märkligt talesätt. Gäss är tvärtom vaksamma, sociala och förnämligt anpassade till sin miljö. De hittar och väljer den föda som bäst svarar mot årstidens behov, och de fattar strategiska beslut inför flyttning och häckning. Att de också är framgångsrika visar den sentida starka ökningen av flera arter.

  • 86.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Pöysä, H.
    Knipa och gräsand är goda grannar2012In: Vår fågelvärld, ISSN 0042-2649, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 39-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 87.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Hur utsatta är utsatta änder?2012In: Vår fågelvärld, ISSN 0042-2649, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 40-42Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Utsättningar av djur och växter har förekommit mycket länge. Slottens svandammar har kommit till av detta skäl, godsen har satt ut jaktbart vilt. Jordbruk och skogsbruk bygger på idén att plantera ut för att sedan skörda, och även naturvården ägnar sig åt ”stödutplanteringar”. Ingen fågelart sätts ut i så stora antal som gräsanden. Men vad är det för änder det handlar om? Vilka blir effekterna?

  • 88.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Utsatta änder inte som vilda2018In: Svensk Jakt, no 10, p. 51-51Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 89.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Thulin, Carl-Gustaf
    SLU, Umeå.
    Champagnon, Jocelyn
    Frankrike.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Frankrike.
    Kreisinger, Jakub
    Tjeckien.
    Prins, H. H. T.
    Nederländerna.
    Crooijmans, R. P. M. A.
    Nederländerna.
    Kraus, R. H. S.
    Tyskland.
    Farmed European mallards are genetically different and cause introgression in the wild population following releases2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The practice of restocking already viable populations to increase harvest potential has since long been common in forestry, fisheries and wildlife management. The potential risks of restocking native species have long been overshadowed by the related issue of invasive alien species. However, during the last decade releases of native species with potentially non-native genome have received more attention. A suitable model to study genetic effects of large-scale releases of native species is the Mallard Anas platyrhynchos, being the most widespread duck in the world, largely migratory, and an important quarry species. More than 3 million unfledged hatchlings are released each year around Europe to increase local harvest. The aims of this study were to determine if wild and released farmed Mallards differ genetically, if there are signs of previous or ongoing introgression between wild and farmed birds, and if the genetic structure of the wild Mallard population has changed since large-scale releases started in Europe in the 1970s. Using 360 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) we found that the genetic structure differed among historical wild, present-day wild, and farmed Mallards in Europe. We also found signs of introgression in the wild Mallard population, that is, individuals with a genetic background of farmed stock are part of the present free-living population. Although only a small proportion of the released Mallards appears to survive to merge with the free-living breeding population, their numbers are still so large that the genetic impact may have significance for the wild population in terms of individual survival and longterm fitness.

  • 90.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Tombre, Ingunn
    Påverkar betande gäss och svanar jordbruket2018In: Fakta för förvaltare: gäss och svanar: kunskapssammanställning om bete,övergödning, smittspridning och skyddsjakt / [ed] Johan Elmberg & Johan Månsson, Stockholm: Naturvårdsverket , 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Swans and geese occur in larger numbers near more people than ever before,  in Sweden as well as in Western Europe.

    • Increasing populations sometimes lead to problems and conflicts. On agricultural land geese and swans can cause costly damage to growing crops. Intense grazing by these birds may also affect natural vegetation, sometimes leading to conflict with conservation and biodiversity goals.

    • Geese and swans are obligate herbivores, consuming leaves, stems, seeds and root parts of terrestrial and aquatic  plants.

    • Grazing on growing crops may cause conflicts of interest also when geese and swans congregate in large numbers in wetlands adjacent to  cropland.

    • Geese and swans provide a multitude of ecosystem services, for example viewing, hunting, meat, and eco-tourism revenues.

    GEESE AND SWANS AS   HERBIVORES

    • As their diet is very rich in fibres and water, geese and swans must consume large amounts of plant material in order to obtain enough nutrients (mainly proteins and carbohydrates).

    • Geese and swans have a highly developed capability to assess the nutrient compo- sition of different species and parts of plants. This is true for proteins and easily digestible carbohydrates, and also for components that are hard to digest or unpala- table. As a consequence, these birds are very selective feeders, if given a   choice.

    • Nutrient needs vary over the year; in autumn and spring relatively more proteins are consumed, whilst plants rich in energy are favoured in winter.

    • In general, agricultural crops contain more nutrients than the natural food plants of geese and swans. As a result, feeding on agricultural land is almost always marter choice’ for them.

  • 91.
    El-Schich, Zahra
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Mölder, Anna
    Phase Holographic Imaging AB, Lund.
    Tassidis, Helena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Härkönen, Pirkko
    Finland.
    Miniotis, Maria Falck
    Malmö University.
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö University.
    Induction of morphological changes in death-induced cancer cells monitored by holographic microscopy2015In: Journal of Structural Biology, ISSN 1047-8477, E-ISSN 1095-8657, Vol. 189, no 3, p. 207-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are using the label-free technique of holographic microscopy to analyze cellular parameters including cell number, confluence, cellular volume and area directly in the cell culture environment. We show that death-induced cells can be distinguished from untreated counterparts by the use of holographic microscopy, and we demonstrate its capability for cell death assessment. Morphological analysis of two representative cell lines (L929 and DU145) was performed in the culture flasks without any prior cell detachment. The two cell lines were treated with the anti-tumour agent etoposide for 1-3days. Measurements by holographic microscopy showed significant differences in average cell number, confluence, volume and area when comparing etoposide-treated with untreated cells. The cell volume of the treated cell lines was initially increased at early time-points. By time, cells decreased in volume, especially when treated with high doses of etoposide. In conclusion, we have shown that holographic microscopy allows label-free and completely non-invasive morphological measurements of cell growth, viability and death. Future applications could include real-time monitoring of these holographic microscopy parameters in cells in response to clinically relevant compounds.

  • 92.
    Ernst, Julie
    et al.
    USA.
    Blood, Nathaniel
    USA.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Environmental action and student environmental leaders: exploring the influence of environmental attitudes, locus of control, and sense of personal responsibility2015In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 149-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Student Climate and Conservation Congress (SC3) is a joint educational effort between the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and the Green Schools Alliance that aims to develop the next generation of conservation leaders through fostering action competence in youth. Data from SC3 participants was used to investigate four predictors of adult environmental behavior (environmental attitudes, locus of control, sense of personal responsibility, intention) to explore their predictability of environmental action and intention toward future involvement in environmental action in student environmental leaders. Of the four variables explored, pre-program levels of environmental attitudes was a significant predictor of environmental action. Additionally, changes in levels of environmental attitudes significantly predicted environmental action, with an increase in environmental attitudes being associated with a decrease in environmental action. Pre-program levels of environmental attitudes and sense of personal responsibility, and an interaction between the two, potentially were predictors of intention toward future involvement in environmental action. Changes in pre- and post-program levels of environmental attitudes, locus of control, and sense of personal responsibility did not significantly predict intention toward future involvement in environmental action, nor did environmental action. Implications for programming and research, in light of the study’s limitations, are discussed.

  • 93.
    Faurby, Sören
    et al.
    Danmark.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Rebecchi, L.
    Italien.
    Funch, P.
    Danmark.
    Variation in anhydrobiotic survival of two eutardigrade morphospecies: a story of cryptic species and their dispersal2008In: Journal of Zoology, ISSN 0952-8369, E-ISSN 1469-7998, Vol. 275, no 2, p. 139-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of geographic variation in anhydrobiotic tolerance may increase our understanding of the population dynamics of terrestrial meiofauna and the relative importance of local adaptation and microhabitat niche separation. Although anhydrobiosis in tardigrades has been studied extensively, few studies have dealt with intraspecific variation in survival and none of these included genetic data to validate the intraspecific nature of the comparisons. Such data are necessary when working with meiofauna as cryptic species are common. We analysed the anhydrobiotic survival and genetic variation in cytochrome oxidase subunit I of two eutardigrades (Richtersius coronifer and Ramazzottius oberhaeuseri) from Italy and Sweden to detect possible local adaptation. Survival was analysed as a multidimensional contingency table and showed that anhydrobiotic survival was higher in Sweden for Ra. oberhaeuseri whereas no significant geographic variation was found for Ri. coronifer. Our genetic analysis indicated the coexistence of two cryptic species of Ra. oberhaeuseri in Italy, only one of which was found in Sweden. It could not be determined whether the variation in Ramazzottius is intra- or interspecific due to the presence of these cryptic species. We suggest that geographic variation in anhydrobiotic survival may be a general phenomenon in tardigrades but further research is necessary to determine the degree of intraspecific variation. The genetic analysis showed indications of long-term isolation of the individual populations of Ri. coronifer but recent dispersal in one of the cryptic species of Ramazzottius. We found higher survival in Ra. oberhaeuseri than in Ri. coronifer. These results indicate a possible coupling between anhydrobiotic survival and dispersal rate.

  • 94.
    Felton, Adam
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp.
    Lindbladh, Matts
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Felton, Annika M.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp.
    Andersson, Erik
    Stockholm University.
    Sekercioglu, Cagan H.
    University of Utah.
    Collingham, Yvonne
    Durham University.
    Huntley, Brian
    Durham University.
    Projecting impacts of anthropogenic climatic change on the bird communities of southern Swedish spruce monocultures: will the species poor get poorer?2014In: Ornis Fennica, ISSN 0030-5685, Vol. 91, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential impact of climatic change on bird species’ distributions in Europe was recently modeled for several scenarios of projected late 21st century climate. The results indicate mean range shifts of hundreds of kilometres north for many of European bird species. Here we consider the implications from such distributional shifts for the bird communities of Norway spruce (Picea abies) monocultures in southern Sweden, a forest type likely to remain prevalent due to forestry, despite climate change. Our assessment led us to three key findings. First, the monocultures offer suitable habitat to only two bird species projected to extend their breeding distribution northwards into southern Sweden this century. Second, species richness was projected to decline overall, which would accentuate the depauperate nature of these stands. Third, all conifer-associated arboreal granivores and three of four conifer-associated arboreal insectivores were projected not to occur, reducing both the functional richness and functional redundancy. We discuss caveats related to our approach, including the potential for bioclimatic projections – used in this study – to be hampered by the artificial retention of dominant vegetation. We also discuss the implications of our results for avian biodiversity in what is today the most prevalent forest type in southern Sweden and in many other regions of Europe.

  • 95.
    Fox, Anthony D.
    et al.
    Danmark.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Tombre, Ingunn M.
    Norge.
    Hessel, Rebecca
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Agriculture and herbivorous waterfowl: a review of the scientific basis for improved management2017In: Biological Reviews, ISSN 1464-7931, E-ISSN 1469-185X, Vol. 92, no 2, p. 854-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swans, geese and some ducks (Anatidae) are obligate herbivores, many are important quarry species and all contribute to a variety of ecosystem services. Population growth and shifting ranges have led to increasing proximity to man and thus increasing conflicts. We review and synthesize the role of these birds as herbivores on agricultural land (cropland, rotational grassland and pasture) and other terrestrial habitats where conflict with human interests may occur. A bibliographic analysis of peer-reviewed papers (N = 359) shows that publication activity peaked in 1991-2000 in North America and 2000-2010 in Europe, and has decreased since. Taxonomic and geographical biases are obvious in research to date: Snow Goose Chen caerulescens was the most studied species (N = 98), and Canada Branta canadensis, Barnacle B. leucopsis and Brent geese B. bernicla all featured in more than 40 studies; most studies originated in northwest Europe or North America, very few have been carried out in Asia and European Russia. On the basis of nutrient/energy budgets of herbivorous waterfowl, it is evident that dense single-species crops (such as rotational grassland, early-growth cereals and root crops) and spilled grain in agricultural landscapes offer elevated energetic and nutritional intake rates of food of higher quality compared to natural or semi-natural vegetation. Hence, although affected by seasonal nutritional demands, proximity to roost, field size, disturbance levels, access to water, food depletion and snow cover, agricultural landscapes tend to offer superior foraging opportunities over natural habitats, creating potential conflict with agriculture. Herbivorous waterfowl select for high protein, soluble carbohydrate and water content, high digestibility as well as low fibre and phenolic compounds, but intake rates from grazing varied with goose body and bill morphology, creating species-specific loci for conflict. Crop damage by trampling and puddling has not been demonstrated convincingly, nor do waterfowl faeces deter grazing stock, but where consumption of crops evidently reduces yields this causes conflict with farmers. Studies show that it is difficult and expensive to assess the precise impacts of waterfowl feeding on yield loss because of other sources of variation. However, less damage has been documented from winter grazing compared to spring grazing and yield loss after spring grazing on grassland appears more pronounced than losses on cereal fields. Although yield losses at national scales are trivial, individual farmers in areas of greatest waterfowl feeding concentrations suffer disproportionately, necessitating improved solutions to conflict. Accordingly, we review the efficacy of population management, disturbance, provision of alternative feeding areas, compensation and large-scale stakeholder involvement and co-management as options for resolving conflict based on the existing literature and present a framework of management advice for the future. We conclude with an assessment of the research needs for the immediate future to inform policy development, improve management of waterfowl populations and reduce conflict with agriculture.

  • 96.
    Freij, Maria
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humaniora.
    Edfors, Ellinor
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Ljung Djärf, Agneta
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Umans, Timurs
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Research environment Auditing, Organisation and Society (AOS). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Avdelningen för ekonomi.
    Rehnstam-Holm, Ann-Sofi
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Pedagogisk karriärstege vid Högskolan Kristianstad: några reflektioner från beredningsgruppens arbete2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Galway, Lindsay P
    et al.
    Canada.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Jones-Casey, Kelsey
    USA.
    Tasala, Kirsti
    Canada.
    Mapping the solastalgia literature: a scoping review study2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solastalgia is a relatively new concept for understanding the links between human and ecosystem health, specifically, the cumulative impacts of climatic and environmental change on mental, emotional, and spiritual health. Given the speed and scale of climate change alongside biodiversity loss, pollution, deforestation, unbridled resource extraction, and other environmental challenges, more and more people will experience solastalgia. This study reviewed 15 years of scholarly literature on solastalgia using a scoping review process. Our goal was to advance conceptual clarity, synthesize the literature, and identify priorities for future research. Four specific questions guided the review process: (1) How is solastalgia conceptualized and applied in the literature?; (2) How is solastalgia experienced and measured in the literature?; (3) How is 'place' understood in the solastalgia literature?; and (4) Does the current body of literature on solastalgia engage with Indigenous worldviews and experiences? Overall, we find there is a need for additional research employing diverse methodologies, across a greater diversity of people and places, and conducted in collaboration with affected populations and potential knowledge, alongside greater attention to the practical implications and applications of solastalgia research. We also call for continued efforts to advance conceptual clarity and theoretical foundations. Key outcomes of this study include our use of the landscape construct in relation to solastalgia and a call to better understand Indigenous peoples' lived experiences of landscape transformation and degradation in the context of historical traumas.

  • 98.
    Ghahfarokhi, Sina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Ketzer, Mercelo
    Linnaeus University.
    Yu, Changxun
    Linnaeus University.
    Lindquist, Therese
    Linnaeus University.
    Djerf, Henric
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Åström, Mats
    Linnaeus University.
    Contamination of Kristianstad biosphere reservoir by metal bound sediments2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Giusti, Matteo
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Svane, Ulrika
    Stockholm University.
    Raymond, Christopher M.
    Swedish University Agricultural Sciences.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    A framework to assess where and how children connect to nature2018In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of the green infrastructure in urban areas largely ignores how people's relation to nature, or human-nature connection (HNC), can be nurtured. One practical reason for this is the lack of a framework to guide the assessment of where people, and more importantly children, experience significant nature situations and establish nature routines. This paper develops such a framework. We employed a mixed-method approach to understand what qualities of nature situations connect children to nature (RQ1), what constitutes children's HNC (RQ2), and how significant nature situations and children's HNC relate to each other over time (RQ3). We first interviewed professionals in the field of connecting children to nature (N = 26), performed inductive thematic analysis of these interviews, and then further examined the inductive findings by surveying specialists (N = 275). We identified 16 qualities of significant nature situations (e.g., "awe," "engagement of senses," "involvement ofmentors") and 10 abilities that constitute children's HNC (e. g., "feeling comfortable in natural spaces," " feeling attached to natural spaces," "taking care of nature"). We elaborated three principles to answer our research questions: (1) significant nature situations are various and with differing consequences for children's HNC; (2) children's HNC is a complex embodied ability; (3) children's HNC progresses over time through diverse nature routines. Together, these findings form the Assessment framework for Children's Human Nature Situations (ACHUNAS). ACHUNAS is a comprehensive framework that outlines what to quantify or qualify when assessing " child-nature connecting" environments. It guides the assessment of where and how children connect to nature, stimulating both the design of nature-connecting human habitats as well as pedagogical approaches to HNC.

  • 100. Godhe, A.
    et al.
    Rehnstam-Holm, Ann-Sofi
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Musselgifternas förekomst regleras av oceanografiska förhållanden2002In: Havsmiljön: aktuell rapport om miljötillståndet i Kattegat, Skagerrak och Öresund. Juni 2002, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitets marina forskningscentrum , 2002Chapter in book (Other academic)
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