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  • 301.
    van Dijk, Jiska
    et al.
    Norge.
    Bongard, Terje
    Norge.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    May, Roel
    Norge.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    The value of nature for growth, development and human well-being – perspectives from human evolution and human behavioral ecology2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 302.
    Vaziri-Sani, Fariba
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Lunds universitet.
    Brundin, Charlotte
    Lund University.
    Agardh, Daniel
    Lund University.
    Osteoprotegerin autoantibodies do not predict low bone mineral density in middle-aged women2017In: Bone Reports, ISSN 2352-1872, Vol. 7, p. 132-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Autoantibodies against osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been associated with osteoporosis. The aim was to develop an immunoassay for OPG autoantibodies and test their diagnostic usefulness of identifying women general population with low bone mineral density.

    Methods

    Included were 698 women at mean age 55.1 years (range 50.4–60.6) randomly selected from the general population. Measurement of wrist bone mineral density (g/cm2) was performed of the non-dominant wrist by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). A T-score < − 2.5 was defined as having a low bone mineral density. Measurements of OPG autoantibodies were carried by radiobinding assays. Cut-off levels for a positive value were determined from the deviation from normality in the distribution of 398 healthy blood donors representing the 99.7th percentile.

    Results

    Forty-five of the 698 (6.6%) women were IgG-OPG positive compared with 2 of 398 (0.5%) controls (p < 0.0001) and 35 of the 698 (5.0%) women had a T-score < − 2.5. There was no difference in bone mineral density between IgG-OPG positive (median 0.439 (range 0.315–0.547) g/cm2) women and IgG-OPG negative (median 0.435 (range 0.176–0.652) g/cm2) women (p = 0.3956). Furthermore, there was neither a correlation between IgG-OPG levels and bone mineral density (rs = 0.1896; p = 0.2068) nor T-score (rs = 0.1889; p = 0.2086). Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of IgG-OPG for low bone mineral density were 5.7% and 92.9%, and positive and negative predictive values were 7.4% and 90.8%, respectively.

    Conclusion

    Elevated OPG autoantibody levels do not predict low bone mineral density in middle-aged women selected from the general population.

  • 303.
    Vecchi, Matteo
    et al.
    Italien.
    Cesari, Michele
    Italien.
    Bertolani, Roberto
    Italien.
    Jönsson, Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Rebecchi, Lorena
    Italien.
    Guidetti, Roberto
    Italien.
    Integrative systematic studies on tardigrades from Antarctica identify new genera and new species within Macrobiotoidea and Echiniscoidea2016In: Invertebrate systematics, ISSN 1445-5226, E-ISSN 1447-2600, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 303-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tardigrades represent one of the most abundant groups of Antarctic metazoans in terms of abundance and diversity, thanks to their ability to withstand desiccation and freezing; however, their biodiversity is underestimated. Antarctic tardigrades from Dronning Maud Land and Victoria Land were analysed from a morphological point of view with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and from a molecular point of view using two genes (18S, 28S) analysed in Bayesian inference and maximum-likelihood frameworks. In addition, indel-coding datasets were used for the first time to infer tardigrade phylogenies. We also compared Antarctic specimens with those from Italy and Greenland. A combined morphological and molecular analysis led to the identification of two new evolutionary lineages, for which we here erect the new genera Acanthechiniscus, gen. nov. (Echiniscidae, Echiniscoidea) and Mesobiotus, gen. nov. (Macrobiotidae, Macrobiotoidea). Moreover, two species new to science were discovered: Pseudechiniscus titianae,sp. nov. (Echiniscidae : Echiniscoidea) and Mesobiotus hilariae, sp. nov. (Macrobiotidae : Macrobiotoidea). This study highlights the high tardigrade diversity in Antarctica and the importance of an integrated approach in faunal and taxonomic studies.

  • 304.
    Wamsler, Christine
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Niven, Lisa
    Lund University.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Lund University.
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö University.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Osmani, Adelina
    Lund University.
    Palo, Thomas
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Stålhammar, Sanna
    Lund University.
    Operationalizing ecosystem-based adaptation: harnessing ecosystem services to buffer communities against climate change2016In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecosystem-based approaches for climate change adaptation are promoted at international, national, and local levels by both scholars and practitioners. However, local planning practices that support these approaches are scattered, and measures are neither systematically implemented nor comprehensively reviewed. Against this background, this paper advances the operationalization of ecosystem-based adaptation by improving our knowledge of how ecosystem-based approaches can be considered in local planning (operational governance level). We review current research on ecosystem services in urban areas and examine four Swedish coastal municipalities to identify the key characteristics of both implemented and planned measures that support ecosystem-based adaptation. The results show that many of the measures that have been implemented focus on biodiversity rather than climate change adaptation, which is an important factor in only around half of all measures. Furthermore, existing measures are limited in their focus regarding the ecological structures and the ecosystem services they support, and the hazards and risk factors they address. We conclude that a more comprehensive approach to sustainable ecosystem-based adaptation planning and its systematic mainstreaming is required. Our framework for the analysis of ecosystem-based adaptation measures proved to be useful in identifying how ecosystem-related matters are addressed in current practice and strategic planning, and in providing knowledge on how ecosystem-based adaptation can further be considered in urban planning practice. Such a systematic analysis framework can reveal the ecological structures, related ecosystem services, and risk-reducing approaches that are missing and why. This informs the discussion about why specific measures are not considered and provides pathways for alternate measures/designs, related operations, and policy processes at different scales that can foster sustainable adaptation and transformation in municipal governance and planning.

  • 305.
    Wendin, Karin
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för mat- och måltidsvetenskap.
    Mårtensson, Lennart
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Sensory quality of drinking water in relation to chemical and microbiological composition2019In: 13th Pangborn Sensory Scinece Symposium, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that tap water tastes different due to where the water is tapped, ie its chemical and microbiological compositions. Taste competitions have been performed in different countries to find out the most preferred tap water. With some few exceptions, no studies have been performed in which the taste of tap water is objectively described by analytical sensory methods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate quality of Swedish drinking water from different dwells with emphasis on sensory, chemical and microbiological analyses.

     

    Tap water origin from surface water and from groundwater was collected from the Swedish municipalities Svalöv and Kristianstad. The water samples were collected in 3 points in each municipality: 1. waterworks; 2. near waterworks; 3. far from waterworks. In addition the commercial water Evian was included in the analyses. Analytical sensory analyses (triangle test and quantitative descriptive analysis) were performed along with chemical and microbiological standard analyses according to Swedish drinking water standards.

     

    The results from the triangle test showed significant sensory differences between tap water from surface water and groundwater, as well as in surface water samples collected in different points. The descriptive analysis showed large differences in the perception of bitterness, minerals and off flavours. The perceived differences are in line with earlier studies pointing out inorganic ions as responsible for the taste sensations. The chemical analyses showed that the major difference between the two types of tap water was a higher mineral content and higher alkalinity in the groundwater compared to the surface water. The microbiological analyses did not show any measurable concentrations in any of the samples. There is a need for further research of chemical and microbiological effects on the flavour of tap water, with focus on microorganisms and chemical compounds in low concentrations.

  • 306.
    Wendin, Karin
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för mat- och måltidsvetenskap.
    Olsson, Viktoria
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för mat- och måltidsvetenskap.
    Forsberg, Sarah
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Mat- och måltidsvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Gerberich, Johanna
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för mat- och måltidsvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Birch, Karina
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för mat- och måltidsvetenskap. karina.birch@hkr.se .
    Berg, Johan
    RISE.
    Langton, Maud
    SLU.
    Davidsson, Fredrik
    Geoloc.
    Stuffe, Sofia
    Atria.
    Andersson, Peter
    Solina Group.
    Rask, Susanne
    Solina Group.
    Cedergardh, Fanny
    TetraPak.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Insects as food: a pilot study for industrial production2019In: 13th Pangborn Sensory Science Symposium, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the many papers reporting on disgust factors of eating insects in Western cultures, the interest of insects as food is increasing, not least because they are nutritious, sustainable and tasty! The time has come to take the next step by making insects available not only as delicious restaurant food, but also for industrial production of foods and meals based on insects. The sensory attributes are of greatest importance to increase understanding of insects as a main ingredient in production and shelf life.

     

    By the use of factorial designs with mealworms as main ingredient, the aim was to evaluate the sensory impact of additions such as salt, oil/water and antioxidant agent. Also the impact of particle size of the mealworms was evaluated.

    Cooked fresh mealworms cut or ground into different particle sizes, oil, water, salt and rosemary were blended according to a factorial design. The resulting products were evaluated by descriptive sensory analysis in addition to instrumental measurements of viscosity and colour. Nutritional contents were calculated. 

    Results showed that particle size of the mealworms had a great impact, ie an increased particle size increased the yellowness and the perceived coarseness. Further, both viscosity and crispiness increased. An increased particle size also meant a decreased odour, probably due to decreased exposure of particle surface. Increased salt content did, as expected, increase saltiness. It also increased the nutty flavour, probably due to the polarity of Sodium Chloride. Different ratios of oil/water did not seem to impact the sensory properties. With reference to the anti-oxidative effects of carnosic acid and carnosol, addition of rosemary had a significant impact on shelf life in terms of decreased rancidity and colour changes. All samples were high in protein content.

     

    All factors, but especially particle size of the mealworm fraction, influenced the sensory attributes.

  • 307.
    Wendin, Karin
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för mat- och måltidsvetenskap.
    Olsson, Viktoria
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Forsberg, Sarah
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Mat- och måltidsvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Gerberich, Johanna
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för mat- och måltidsvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Birch, Karina
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för mat- och måltidsvetenskap.
    Berg, Johan
    RISE.
    Langton, Maud
    SLU.
    Davidsson, Fredrik
    Geoloc AB.
    Stuffe, Sofia
    Atria Skandinavia.
    Andersson, Peter
    Solina Group.
    Rask, Susanne
    Solina Group.
    Cedergårdh, Fanny
    TetraPak.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Insects as food: a pilot study for industrial production2019In: Book of Abstracts of the EAAP 70th Annual  Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science: Animal Farming for a Healthy World, Ghent, 2019, p. -161Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the many papers reporting on disgust factors of eating insects in Western cultures, the interest of insects as food is increasing, not least because they are nutritious, sustainable and tasty! The time has come to take the next step by making insects available not only as delicious restaurant food, but also for industrial production of foods and meals based on insects. The sensory attributes are of greatest importance to increase understanding of insects as a main ingredient in production and shelf life. 

    By the use of factorial designs with mealworms as main ingredient, the aim was to evaluate the sensory impact of additions such as salt, oil/water and antioxidant agent. Also the impact of particle size of the mealworms was evaluated.

    Cooked fresh mealworms cut or ground into different particle sizes, oil, water, salt and rosemary were blended according to a factorial design. The resulting products were evaluated by descriptive sensory analysis in addition to instrumental measurements of viscosity and colour. Nutritional contents were calculated. 

    Results showed that particle size of the mealworms had a great impact, ie an increased particle size increased the yellowness and the perceived coarseness. Further, both viscosity and crispiness increased. An increased particle size also meant a decreased odour, probably due to decreased exposure of particle surface. Increased salt content did, as expected, increase saltiness. It also increased the nutty flavour, probably due to the polarity of Sodium Chloride. Different ratios of oil/water did not seem to impact the sensory properties. With reference to the anti-oxidative effects of carnosic acid and carnosol, addition of rosemary had a significant impact on shelf life in terms of decreased rancidity and colour changes. All samples were high in protein content.

     

    All factors, but especially particle size of the mealworm fraction, influenced the sensory attributes.

  • 308.
    Wolf-Watz, Daniel
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Sandell, Klas
    Karlstads universitet.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro universitet.
    Friluftsliv och miljöengagemang: sammankopplade men utan enkla samband2014In: Friluftsliv i förändring: studier från svenska upplevelselandskap / [ed] Fredman, P., Stenseke, M., & Sandell, K., Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2014, p. 152-166Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 309.
    Woodward, Guy
    et al.
    Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science, University College Cork.
    Gessner, Mark O.
    Department of Aquatic Ecology, Eawag.
    Giller, Paul S.
    Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science, University College Cork.
    Gulis, Vladislav
    Institute of Marine Research (IMAR) and Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra.
    Hladyz, Sally
    Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science, University College Cork.
    Lecerf, Antoine
    Université de Toulouse.
    Malmqvist, Björn
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    McKie, Brendan G.
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Tiegs, Scott D.
    Department of Aquatic Ecology, Eawag.
    Cariss, Helen
    Department of Environmental and Geographical Sciences, Manchester Metropolitan University.
    Dobson, Mike
    Department of Environmental and Geographical Sciences, Manchester Metropolitan University.
    Elosegi, Arturo
    Department of Plant Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country, Bilbao.
    Ferreira, Verónica
    Institute of Marine Research (IMAR) and Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra.
    Graça, Manuel A.S.
    Institute of Marine Research (IMAR) and Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra.
    Fleituch, Tadeusz
    Institute of Nature Conservation, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Nistorescu, Marius
    Department of Systems Ecology and Sustainability, University of Bucharest.
    Pozo, Jesús
    Department of Plant Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country, Bilbao.
    Risnoveanu, Geta
    Department of Systems Ecology and Sustainability, University of Bucharest.
    Schindler, Markus
    Department of Aquatic Ecology, Eawag.
    Vadineanu, Angheluta
    Department of Systems Ecology and Sustainability, University of Bucharest.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Chauvet, Eric
    Université de Toulouse.
    Continental-scale effects of nutrient pollution on stream ecosystem functioning2012In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 336, no 6087, p. 1438-1440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excessive nutrient loading is a major threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide that leads to profound changes in aquatic biodiversity and biogeochemical processes. Systematic quantitative assessment of functional ecosystem measures for river networks is, however, lacking, especially at continental scales. Here, we narrow this gap by means of a pan-European field experiment on a fundamental ecosystem process—leaf-litter breakdown—in 100 streams across a greater than 1000-fold nutrient gradient. Dramatically slowed breakdown at both extremes of the gradient indicated strong nutrient limitation in unaffected systems, potential for strong stimulation in moderately altered systems, and inhibition in highly polluted streams. This large-scale response pattern emphasizes the need to complement established structural approaches (such as water chemistry, hydrogeomorphology, and biological diversity metrics) with functional measures (such as litter-breakdown rate, whole-system metabolism, and nutrient spiraling) for assessing ecosystem health.

  • 310.
    Yermakovych, Iryna
    et al.
    Ukraina.
    Mårtensson, Lennart
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Svensson, Britt-Marie
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Samoilenko, Natalia
    Ukraina.
    Investigation of Hard Biodegradable Pharmaceuticals Pollutants Treatment of Hospital Wastewaters2014In: Book of abstracts, 2014, p. 173-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the results of the research performed in the different modern research laboratories the remnants of drugs and their derivatives are found in surface waters in France, USA, UK, Germany, Denmark and Sweden. These substances also can be found in sewage sludge, river and ocean sediments and in the municipal landfills filtrates. Some species have been found even in drinking water and ice, grou nd and ocean waters. Many studies confirmed the data of the annual drug releasing into the environment, which counts several hundred of kilograms. Thus, the investigations of negative impact of pharmaceutical substances and their derivatives on aquatic organisms have been performed  during more  than 20 years and showed an extremely negative presence of any drugs in the waters. Now, they are still  considering  as  emerging organic contaminants in the different type of waters. The main sources of water pollution by pharmaceuticals and their derivatives are wastewater from hospitals, clinics, pharmaceutical industries and domestic sewage as well. However, the main percentage of pharmaceuticals dumped into wastewaters is coming from the hospitals. This is typical for large cities, where is situated a great n um ber of hospitals and health care institutions. In the opinion of one study hospital wastewaters have been found in a 15 times higher potential ecotoxicity than the general urban have. The negative effect of pharmaceuticals influence into environment can be decrease due to application of different kinds of additional wastewater treatment as Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs). The main approaches of hospitals wastewater treatment in Ukraine and Sweden by implementation of AOPs method were considered in this study. The main data of this research will be presented. 

4567 301 - 310 of 310
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