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  • 201.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Nilsson, Maria
    Lund University.
    Hagell, Peter
    Lund University.
    Adaptation of "Seniors in the community risk evaluation for eating and nutrition, Version II" (SCREEN II) for use in Sweden: report on the translation process2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes the initial stages of the Swedish adaptation of "Seniors in the community: Risk evaluation for eating and nutrition, Version II" (SCREEN II) that has been developed by Heather Keller.

  • 202.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Norberg, Erika
    Central Hospital, Kristianstad.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Diagnostic performance of the Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form – Version II (MEONF-II) and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) among hospital inpatients – a cross-sectional study2011In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 10, p. 24-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The usefulness of the nutritional screening tool Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form – Version II (MEONF-II) relative to Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) remains untested. Here we attempted to fill this gap by testing the diagnostic performance and user-friendliness of the MEONF-II and the NRS 2002 in relation to the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) among hospital inpatients. Methods: Eighty seven hospital inpatients were assessed for nutritional status with the 18- item MNA (considered as the gold standard), and screened with the NRS 2002 and the MEONF-II. Results: The MEONF-II sensitivity (0.61), specificity (0.79), and accuracy (0.68) were acceptable. The corresponding figures for NRS 2002 were 0.37, 0.82 and 0.55, respectively. MEONF-II and NRS 2002 took five minutes each to complete. Assessors considered MEONF-II instructions and items to be easy to understand and complete (96- 99%), and the items to be relevant (87%). For NRS 2002, the corresponding figures were 75-93% and 79%, respectively. Conclusions: The MEONF-II is an easy to use, relatively quick and sensitive screening tool to assess risk of undernutrition among hospital inpatients. With respect to user-friendliness and sensitivity the MEONF-II seems to perform better than the NRS 2002, although larger studies are needed for firm conclusions. The different scoring systems for undernutrition appear to identify overlapping but not identical patient groups. A potential limitation with the study is that the MNA was used as gold standard among patients younger than 65 years.

  • 203.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Norberg, Erika
    Departments of Nutrition and Health, Central Hospital, Kristianstad.
    Vallén, Christina
    Departments of Nutrition and Health, Central Hospital, Kristianstad.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Cut-off scores for the Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form – Version II (MEONF-II) among hospital inpatients2011In: Journal of Food and Nutrition Research, ISSN 1336-8672, E-ISSN 1338-4260, Vol. 55, p. 7289-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

    The newly developed Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form - Version II (MEONF-II) has shown promising sensitivity and specificity in relation to the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). However, the suggested MEONF-II cut-off scores for deciding low/moderate and high risk for undernutrition (UN) (>2 and >4, respectively) have not been decided based on statistical criteria but on clinical reasoning. The objective of this study was to identify the optimal cut-off scores for the MEONF-II in relation to the well-established MNA based on statistical criteria.

    DESIGN:

    Cross-sectional study.

    METHODS:

    The study included 187 patients (mean age, 77.5 years) assessed for nutritional status with the MNA (full version), and screened with the MEONF-II. The MEONF-II includes assessments of involuntary weight loss, Body Mass Index (BMI) (or calf circumference), eating difficulties, and presence of clinical signs ofUN. MEONF-II data were analysed by Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves and the area under the curve (AUC); optimal cut-offs were identified by the Youden index (J=sensitivity+specificity-1).

    RESULTS:

    According to the MEONF-II, 41% were at moderate or high UN risk and according to the MNA, 50% were at risk or already undernourished. The suggested cut-off scores were supported by the Youden indices. The lower cut-off for MEONF-II, used to identify any level of risk for UN (>2; J=0.52) gave an overall accuracy of 76% and the AUC was 80%. The higher cut-off for identifying those with high risk for UN (>4; J=0.33) had an accuracy of 63% and the AUC was 70%.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The suggested MEONF-II cut-off scores were statistically supported. This improves the confidence of its clinical use.

  • 204.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Norberg, Erika
    Departments of Nutrition and Health, Central Hospital, Kristianstad.
    Vallén, Christina
    Departments of Nutrition and Health, Central Hospital, Kristianstad.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Cut-off scores for the Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form - Version ll (MEONF ll) among hospital inpatients2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 205.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Torfadóttir, Olina
    Akureyri University Hospital.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Inter- and intrarater reliability of Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form - version II (MEONF-II) nurse assessments among hospital inpatients2014In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 13, p. 18-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition form - version II (MEONF - II) is a recently developed nursing nutritional screening tool. However, its inter- and intrarater reliability has not been assessed.

    METHODS: Inpatients (n = 24; median age, 69 years; 11 women) were assessed by eight nurses (interrater reliability, two nurses scored each patient independently) using the MEONF-II on two consecutive days (intrarater reliability, each patient was scored by the same nurse day 1 and day 2).

    RESULTS: Six patients were at moderate/high undernutrition risk. Inter- and intrarater reliabilities (Gwet's agreement coefficient) for the MEONF-II 2-category classification (no/low risk versus moderate/high risk) were 0.93 and 0.81; for the 3-category classification (no/low - moderate - high risk) reliabilities (Gwet's weighted agreement coefficient) were 0.98 and 0.88; and total score inter- and intrarater reliabilities (intraclass correlation) were 0.92 and 0.84.

    CONCLUSION: Reliability of MEONF-II nurse assessments among adult hospital inpatients was supported and the tool can be used in research and clinical practice.

  • 206.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Torfadóttir, Ólina
    Akureyri University Hospital.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Malnutrition and nutritional care in an Icelandic teaching hospital2014In: Research, ISSN 2334-1009, no 1, p. 1270-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: About 30% of hospital inpatients are at undernutrition (UN) risk and it is important that sufficient nutritional treatment and care is provided in order to avoid a decline in health. Aim: To explore the prevalence of UN risk, the associations between UN-risk and other factors, and describe the nutritional treatment/care towards those at UN-risk at an Icelandic teaching hospital. An additional aim was to evaluate the user friendliness of a nutritional screening tool. Methods: Inpatients (n=56; median age 69 years; 29 women) were assessed by eight nurses using the Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition form – version II (MEONF-II), a recently developed nursing nutritional screening tool. Results: In total 23% (n=13) were at moderate/high UN-risk. The prevalence of overweight/obesity was 57%. Among patients at UN-risk, 61% received energy dense food, oral nutritional supplements, and/or artificial nutrition; this figure was 35% among those at no/low risk. MEONF-II total scores correlated with dependency in activities of daily living (rs, 0.350), and UN-risk categories correlated with tiredness (rs, 0.426). The MEONF-II was regarded as easy to use and relevant. Conclusion: There is a need for interventions connecting the nutritional screening with individualised nutritional treatment and care in order to narrow the gap between screening and intervention. The Icelandic version of the MEONF-II is perceived as user-friendly.

  • 207. Winzell, C
    et al.
    Pendrill, L
    Felin, A
    Melin, J
    Nilsson, E
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Hagqvist, Curt
    Comparisons require quality-assured measurement technology2019In: Rasch Measurement Transactions (RMT), ISSN 1051-0896, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 1721-1723Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 208.
    Winzell, Claes
    et al.
    Rise mätteknik.
    Pendrill, Leslie
    Rise mätteknik.
    Felin, Aslak
    Rise mätteknik.
    Melin, Jeanette
    Rise mätteknik.
    Nilsson, Evalill
    Linköpings universitet.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Hagqvist, Curt
    Karlstads universitet.
    Jämförelser kräver kvalitetssäkrad mätteknik2019In: Dagens Medicin, debattArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
2345 201 - 208 of 208
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