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  • 151.
    Lenninger, Sara M
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Sinha, Chris
    Hunan University.
    Sonesson, Göran
    Lunds universitet.
    Editorial introduction: semiotic and cognitive development in human evolution2015In: Cognitive development, ISSN 0885-2014, E-ISSN 1879-226X, Vol. 36, no Oct/Dec, p. 127-129Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 152.
    Liborius, Isabelle
    Kristianstad University, School of Teacher Education.
    Motivation till personlig utveckling2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Den, i olika forskningsartiklar, återkommande uppfattningen om att enperson som är autonomt orienterad är mer benägen till att utveckla enmotivation till personlig utveckling ledde till denna undersökning.Syftet med studien var att undersöka hur autonomi påverkar människortill motivation till personlig utveckling. Studien tar sin utgångspunkt iself-determination theory och dess underteori causality orientationstheory, med de tre orienteringarna kontrollerad, impersonell ochautonomi, vilka handlar om orsak till varför en person handlar på ettvisst sätt och effekten därav. De olika orienteringarna mättes med enenkät konstruerad efter general causality orientation scale ochmotivation till personlig utveckling mättes med egenkonstrueradefrågor. Enkäten lades ut på fyra olika sidor på Internet medförhoppning om att nå ett brett deltagande. Studien visade att denkontrollerade orienteringen var den av de tre orienteringarna sompåverkade människor i högst grad till motivation till personligutveckling. I studien ingick 62 stycken försöksdeltagare.Den, i olika forskningsartiklar, återkommande uppfattningen om att enperson som är autonomt orienterad är mer benägen till att utveckla enmotivation till personlig utveckling ledde till denna undersökning.Syftet med studien var att undersöka hur autonomi påverkar människortill motivation till personlig utveckling. Studien tar sin utgångspunkt iself-determination theory och dess underteori causality orientationstheory, med de tre orienteringarna kontrollerad, impersonell ochautonomi, vilka handlar om orsak till varför en person handlar på ettvisst sätt och effekten därav. De olika orienteringarna mättes med enenkät konstruerad efter general causality orientation scale ochmotivation till personlig utveckling mättes med egenkonstrueradefrågor. Enkäten lades ut på fyra olika sidor på Internet medförhoppning om att nå ett brett deltagande. Studien visade att denkontrollerade orienteringen var den av de tre orienteringarna sompåverkade människor i högst grad till motivation till personligutveckling. I studien ingick 62 stycken försöksdeltagare.

  • 153.
    Lidström, Anette
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för psykologi.
    Visual uncertainty in serial dependence: facing noise2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical evidence suggests that the visual system uses prior visual information to predict the future state of the world. This is believed to occur through an information integration mechanism known as serial dependence. Current perceptions are influenced by prior visual information in order to create perceptual continuity in an everchanging noisy environment. Serial dependence has been found to occur for both low-level stimuli features (e.g., numerosity, orientation) and high-level stimuli like faces. Recent evidence indicates that serial dependence for low-level stimuli is affected by current stimulus reliability. When current stimuli are low in reliability, the perceptual influence from previously viewed stimuli is stronger. However, it is not clear whether stimulus reliability also affects serial dependence for high-level stimuli like faces. Faces are highly complex stimuli which are processed differently from other objects. Additionally, face perception is suggested to be especially vulnerable to external visual noise. Here, I used regular and visually degraded face stimuli to investigate whether serial dependence for faces is affected by stimulus reliability. The results showed that previously viewed degraded faces did not have a very strong influence on perceptions of currently viewed regular faces. In contrast, when currently viewed faces were degraded, the perceptual influence from previously viewed regular faces was rather strong. Surprisingly, there was a quite strong perceptual influence from previously viewed faces on currently viewed faces when both faces were degraded. This could mean that the effect of stimulus reliability in serial dependence for faces is not due to encoding disabilities, but rather a perceptual choice.

  • 154.
    Liljedahl, Sonja
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Samband mellan Utmattningssyndrom och Personlighet2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Burnout can be the result of work related stress which effects both employees and employers. The present study examines whether there is a relationship between burnout and personality. Participants (N = 101) replied to a web-based questionnaire including 77 questions about the participant, workload, feelings about work and general questions about the participant’s per-sonality. For personality, the results showed that neuroticism was a predictor of emotional ex-haustion. There was a negative correlation between depersonalization, extraversion and agree-ableness and a positive correlation between depersonalization and neuroticism. High levels of extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness positively correlated with personal accom-plishment and neuroticism correlated negatively with personal achievement. The control vari-ables were of great importance and the result showed that low demand, low control and low social support were predictors of emotional exhaustion. Low social support predicted deper-sonalization and women rated themselves as being more cynical than men. The application and significance of this study for future research regarding burnout were discussed.

  • 155.
    Liljenfors, Rikard
    Lunds universitet.
    Altering the point of you: perspectives on intersubjectivity and metacognition2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the thesis was to examine different aspects of the role of intersubjectivity in metacognitive development and in social understanding. More specifically, it investigates how different theoretical frameworks, such as mentalization theory, the theory of primary intersubjectivity, and interaction theory describe the developmental role of intersubjectivity. The suggestions these theories make in regard to this is also studied. Common to all three papers included in the dissertation is the conviction that intersubjectivity actually is central for, and affects in a basic way, social and cognitive development from the very beginning of life.

    The methods employed are theoretical and concern the analysis of empirical studies in developmental psychology, as well as the analysis of, and comparison between, theories concerning different aspects of social understanding.

    In the first paper, metacognition is interpreted as a way of managing cognitive resources that does not necessitate algorithmic strategies or metarepresentation. When pragmatic, world-directed actions cannot reduce the distance to a particular goal, the agents involved may engage in epistemic action directed at cognition. Such actions are often physical and involve other people, and thus are open to observation. Taking a dynamic systems approach to development, it is suggested that implicit and perceptual metacognition emerges from dyadic reciprocal interaction. Early intersubjectivity allows infants to internalize and construct rudimentary strategies for monitoring and control of their own and of others’ cognitions by means of emotion and attention. The functions of initiating, maintaining and achieving turns make proto-conversation a productive platform for developing metacognition. It enables the caregiver and the infant to create shared routines for epistemic actions that permit training of metacognitive skills. The adult is of double epistemic use to the infant—as a teacher who comments on and corrects the infant’s efforts, and as a cognitive resource for the infant.

    The second paper deals with the question of how primary engagement and interaction relate to social understanding, most notably mentalization. The basic hypothesis considered is that primary intersubjectivity and mentalization are complementary and that the latter depends on the former, but the converse to this is not the case. Primary intersubjectivity is the sharing of experiences. It involves emotional engagement in second-person relations that are meaningful to the infant already from the start, whereas the theory of affect mirroring provides an explanation of how mentalization and representational abilities develop from dyadic interaction and contingency detection. A comparison of the theories suggests that, despite of their differences, they can fruitfully be combined. This paves the way for developing an alternative interpretation of affect mirroring, one based on the idea of young infants’ understanding the experiential dimension of emotion and using this to understand others. This makes it possible to trace the continuous development of social understanding based on emotion experience and affect sharing, and in addition to elaborate on the role of second-person engagement in attachment.

    The third paper concerns the concept of mentalization as it was introduced into psychological science by Fonagy and his associates. The study describes some fundamental aspects of how the development of mentalization is viewed within the framework of this theoretical approach, enabling certain issues that seem difficult to explain in terms of mentalization theory to be more readily understood. A critical discussion of the theory is then undertaken, comparing and contrasting it with the theory of primary intersubjectivity. A suggestion is made concerning the development of mentalization that connects it with the notion of primary intersubjectivity. More specifically, it is argued that mentalization develops originally within the context of primary intersubjectivity, and that primary intersubjectivity is a basic prerequisite for the development of mentalization and in addition that there is a partial overlap between the concepts of primary intersubjectivity and implicit mentalization.

  • 156.
    Liljenfors, Rikard
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Samhällsvetenskap.
    From primary intersubjectivity to mentalization: on the development of social understandingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 157.
    Liljenfors, Rikard
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Samhällsvetenskap.
    Mentalization, intersubjectivity and affect mirroring: a critical discussion of some aspects of the development of mentalizationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 158.
    Liljenfors, Rikard
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Samhällsvetenskap. Lunds universitet.
    Lundh, Lars-Gunnar
    Lunds universitet.
    Mentalization and intersubjectivity towards a theoretical integration2015In: Psychoanalytic psychology, ISSN 0736-9735, E-ISSN 1939-1331, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 36-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of the concept of mentalization in psychological science by Fonagy and colleagues has opened up new perspectives for the understanding of psychopathology, psychotherapy, and child development. The present study reviews the theory of mentalization, with a focus on its 4 dimensions (cognitive/affective, implicit/explicit, self/other, and external/internal), and some unclear points and unresolved issues are identified. Mentalization theory is then contrasted with the theory of primary intersubjectivity, which is often seen as an incompatible approach to the development of social understanding. It is argued that this theory, at least in 1 of its interpretations, is not only compatible with mentalization theory, but may also possibly contribute to the resolution of some problems in mentalization theory. More specifically, it is argued that mentalization originally develops in the context of primary intersubjectivity, and that primary intersubjectivity is a basic prerequisite for the development of mentalization; but also that there is a considerable overlap between the concepts of primary intersubjectivity and those of implicit and externally focused mentalization.

  • 159.
    Lindberg, Beatrice
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Prevalens av ADHD bland fängelsedömda män och kvinnor: Vilka skillnader och likheter finns mellan könen?2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate how many of the men and women sentenced to prison that suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It also aims to answer the question of however there is a difference between sexes according to prevalence, and the correlation between ADHD and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). The method used is self-report questionnaires which are well tested for this purpose, Wender-Utah Rating Scale (WURS) and Mini Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I). The questionnaires were answered by 49 male and female prison inmates, who were residing in prisons in mid-Sweden. The results of the study show that a high number of the population suffers from both ADHD and ASPD. The differences in sexes were not statistically significant, but based on numbers the females are higher in prevalence than the males in ADHD. Since there were few males in this study, the results, however, need to be interpreted with caution.

  • 160.
    Lindberg, Charlotta
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education.
    Hög stress, låg självkänsla och psykisk ohälsa, samt begränsad coping bland vuxna personer med autismspektrumtillstånd2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health difficulties like anxiety and depression are highly prevalent among individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The aim of the study was to examine the effects of stress, self-esteem and coping strategies on mental health difficulties. The ASD group consisted of 123 individuals and 115 persons without diagnoses. According to the independet t-test, people within ASD had statistically significantly higher degrees of both anxiety and depression Both groups had elevated levels of anxiety. The ASD group had also elevated degrees of depression. Social venting was a preventive factor against developing depression in both groups. The ASD group had lower self-esteem and higher perceived stress compared to the control group. The ASD group had statistically significantly higher levels of affective coping and denial. The ASD group had also less degrees of problem solving and positive reinterpretation compared to the control group. 

  • 161.
    Lindblom, Sophia
    Kristianstad University, School of Teacher Education.
    Snälla kriminella och liberala pingstvänner: En studie i personlighet och dogmatism2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Vissa människor har mer bestämda åsikter eller radikala övertygelser än andra. Den här studien belyser om fenomenet skiljer sig mellan olika grupper och om det har att göra med personlighet. Totalt 90 personer ur grupperna kristna, kriminella och en kontrollgrupp undersöktes avseende dogmatism och Big Five teorins personlighetsfaktorer. En one-way ANOVA visade att gruppen kriminella var signifikant mer dogmatiska än kontrollgruppen och tenderade att vara mer dogmatiska än kristna personer. En regressionsanalys visade att Big Five teorins personlighetsfaktorer predicerar dogmatism och att känslomässig instabilitet (N) är den enda signifikanta prediktorn med störst vikt. Utbildningsnivå kombinerat med känslomässig instabilitet (N) visades öka prediktionen av dogmatism och utbildningsnivå hade den största prediktionsbetydelsen. En one-way ANOVA relaterade låg utbildningsnivå till dogmatism. Motsatt tidigare forskning hittades även höga värden av vänlighet för gruppen kriminella.

  • 162.
    Linderoth, Ida
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Olsson, My
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Lycka lämnar avtryck i minnet: en empirisk studie om sjuksköterskestudenters upplevelser av lycka2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Som sjuksköterskestudent rustas man inför sitt kommande yrke. En del av utbildningen handlar om att vidga sin världsbild genom att sätta sig in i fenomen som exempelvis lycka för att kunna förstå patientens livsvärld. Lycka visar sig trots sjukdom och lidande vara ett centralt fenomen i patientens värld. Om sjuksköterskestudenter har kunskaper om sin egen livsvärld och förstår upplevelsen om fenomenet lycka möjliggör detta att kunna sätta sig in i patientens livsvärld. Syfte: Att få en djupare förståelse för fenomenet lycka ur sjuksköterskestudenters perspektiv. Metod: Studien baserades på 39 berättelser om lycka skrivna av sjuksköterskestudenter. En kvalitativ innehållsanalys låg till grund för analysen. Resultat: Situationer då lyckan utlöstes var individuella men upplevelsen var densamma. Stunderna av lycka var korta och något som de tänkte tillbaka på. De upplevde känslor som de inte ville skulle ta slut. Diskussion: Om sjuksköterskestudenter har en förståelse för fenomenet lycka, hur det upplevs, kan detta bidra till att hjälpa patienter minnas och dela med sig av upplevelser vilket kan bidra till stunder av lycka. Slutsats: Om sjuksköterskestudenter har en djupare förståelse för lycka kan de använda det inför sitt kommande yrke.

  • 163.
    Lindgren, M.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Lund University and University Hospital.
    Eckert, B.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Lund University and University Hospital.
    Stenberg, Georg
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Lund University and University Hospital.
    Agardh, C. D.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Lund University and University Hospital.
    Restitution of neurophysiological functions, performance, and subjective symptoms after moderate insulin-induced hypoglycaemia in non-diabetic men1996In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 218-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The restoration of cognitive function was studied in 10 healthy men aged 26 years (25.5 +/- 1.2 years; mean +/- SD) after insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (arterialized blood glucose 2.5 +/- 0.4 mmol l-1) for 62 +/- 8 min. Another group of six men participated in a single blind sham study for comparison. The hypoglycaemic event caused a significant increase (p = 0.006) in serum adrenaline levels. Ratings of adrenergically mediated symptoms increased during hypoglycaemia (p = 0.006), as did neuroglycopenic symptoms (p = 0.002), although neuroglycopenia ratings increased in both studies. During hypoglycaemia, P300 amplitudes in a relatively demanding visual search task decreased (p = 0.02), whereas easier tasks were unaffected. The amplitudes were restored after 40 min of normoglycaemia. Reaction time deteriorated after restoration of normoglycaemia, suggesting an effect of hypoglycaemia on learning. Thus, hypoglycaemia at a blood glucose level that is common among patients treated with insulin causes clear cognitive dysfunction, although restoration of the cognitive dysfunction to normal was fast.

  • 164.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Lund University.
    Stenberg, Georg
    Department of Psychology, Lund University.
    Rosén, Ingmar
    Division of Clinical Neurophysiology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Lund University, University Hospital.
    Directed forgetting, event-related potentials and nicotine1999In: Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0885-6222, E-ISSN 1099-1077, Human Psychopharmacology, Vol. 14, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifteen male users of oral snuff performed a directed forgetting task after over-night abstinence and after administration of oral snuff. Directed forgetting tasks use cues to classify items for differential reporting at test, emphasising the need for strategic encoding. Recognition was better after nicotine administration, but we found no evidence for greater strategic control, as hypothetically reflected in successful compliance with the directed forgetting instructions. Reaction time decreased after nicotine administration. Performance among fifteen controls was unaffected over two sessions.

  • 165.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Lund.
    Stenberg, Georg
    University of Lund.
    Rosén, Ingmar
    University of Lund.
    Effects of nicotine in a bimodal attention task1998In: Neuropsychobiology, ISSN 0302-282X, E-ISSN 1423-0224, Vol. 38, p. 42-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifteen male users of oral snuff participated in an experiment where we used an auditory-visual vigilance task to study nicotine effects on P300 and response parameters. Quantitative EEG was also studied. Fifteen male non-users served as a control group.We found some decrease of response times, and slightly improved signal detection. P300 parameters were not affected in this study. Quantitative EEG-analysis indicated an expected increase of arousal, as activity within the alpha band shifted towards higher frequencies.

  • 166.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University Hospital, Lund University.
    Stenberg, Georg
    Department of Psychology, University Hospital, Lund University.
    Rosén, Ingmar
    Department of Psychology, University Hospital, Lund University.
    Effects of nicotine in visual attention tasks1996In: Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0885-6222, E-ISSN 1099-1077, Vol. 11, p. 47-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty-five male volunteers (18 nicotine-users and 17 controls) participated in an experiment where a flanker task and a search task were used. It was hypothesized that if nicotine affects selective attention, effects of distracting flanker stimuli should be diminished, and effects of allocation strategies in the search task should be more marked. Nicotine-users performed the tasks after an over-night abstinence, and after administration of oral snuff. In both tasks nicotine users improved more than controls, but there was no indication of nicotine effects on selective attention in either task. Our results point towards a non-specific arousing effect of nicotine.

  • 167.
    Linninge, Caroline
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Jönsson, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Psykologi.
    Bolinsson, Hans
    Lund University.
    Önning, Gunilla
    Lund University.
    Eriksson, Joakim
    Lund University.
    Johansson, Gerd
    Lund University.
    Ahrné, Siv
    Lund University.
    Effects of acute stress provocation on cortisol levels, zonulin and inflammatory markers in low- and high-stressed men2018In: Biological Psychology, ISSN 0301-0511, E-ISSN 1873-6246, Vol. 138, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The virtual version of the Trier Social Stress Test (V-TSST) is an effective and standardized tool for social stress induction. This study aimed to examine gut permeability and physiological and inflammatory markers of reactivity to acute psychosocial stress. Forty young men were classified as high-stressed (HIGHS) or low-stressed (LOWS) according to the Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire. Cardiovascular reactivity and gut dysfunction were studied along with cortisol, zonulin and cytokines. Gut permeability was shown to be affected within one hour after the psychosocial stress induction, and shown to be dependent on age. Interleukin-6 increased with time, most pronounced at the end of the one-hour recovery after V-TSST, and was positively correlated to age. HIGHS experienced more abdominal dysfunction compared to LOWS. In conclusion, this study is the first to show fluctuations in gut permeability after psychosocial stress induction. This was partly associated with changes in inflammatory markers.

  • 168.
    Lundgren, Ulf G
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Personlighetens inverkan på aktivt och passivt jobbsökande, karriärambition och arbetstillfredställelse2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has focused limited attention on how personality affects job search for university educated people in work and no studies have focused on the difference between active and passive job seekers. This survey-based study that examined university educated economists and engineers with 5-25 years of experience, showed that career ambition mediated active job search for the personality dimensions of openness, agreeableness and extraversion and also gave clear evidence that active job seekers have lower levels of job satisfaction, and higher levels of career ambition, agreeableness and extraversion, compared with passive job seekers. These findings provide a more nuanced picture of the impact of different recruitment strategies and provide a starting point for in-depth studies on passive job seekers

  • 169.
    Löfgren, Malin
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Persson, Kristina
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Tonåringars normbrytande beteende och attityder till alkohol och droger: spelar tonåringars upplevelser av föräldrars beteendekontroll, psykisk kontroll och relation någon roll?2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur uppfattar tonåringar sina föräldrar? Har tonåringars upplevelser av sina föräldrars psykiska kontroll, beteendekontroll och relation till dem någon betydelse när det gäller deras attityder till alkohol och droger samt normbrytande beteende? Syftet med studien var att undersöka om tonåringars uppfattning av föräldrars psykiska kontroll, beteendekontroll och föräldra-tonårsrelation var relaterat till attityder till alkohol och droger samt normbrytande beteende hos tonåringar. Studien ämnade också undersöka om det varierade beroende på kön och etnisk bakgrund. I studien deltog 143 niondeklassare i två medelstora städer i Sverige, 58% pojkar och 42% flickor. Av deltagarna var 56% från Sverige och 44% hade annan etnisk bakgrund, vilket innebar att de eller någon av föräldrarna var födda i något annat land än Sverige. Resultaten visar att hög upplevd psykisk kontroll var relaterat till hög grad av normbrytande beteende och osunda attityder till alkohol och droger hos tonåringar. Det visar även att en god föräldra-tonårsrelation var relaterat till låg grad av normbrytande beteende och sunda attityder till alkohol och droger. Studien visar också att tonåringar med annan etnisk bakgrund upplevde en något högre nivå av psykisk kontroll och beteendekontroll än svenska tonåringar. Flickor upplevde också beteendekontroll i någon högre grad än pojkar. Psykisk kontroll och föräldra-tonårsrelationen var de variabler som hade starkast samband med attityder till alkohol och droger samt normbrytande beteende. Psykisk kontroll var också den enda variabeln som kunde predicera osunda attityder till alkohol och droger samt normbrytande beteende. Hög upplevd beteendekontroll var relaterat till sunda attityder till alkohol och droger i den här studien.

  • 170.
    Madsen, Kent
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Psykologi. Åbo Akademi University.
    Therapeutic jurisprudence in investigative interviews: the effects of a humanitarian rapport-orientated and a dominant non-rapport orientated approach on adult’s memory performance and psychological well-being2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) sees the law as a social force with the underlying idea that legal procedures should promote the psychological well-being (PWB) of individuals involved in juridical actions; for example, individual police interviewers could act as therapeutic agents. Investigative interviewing is guided by a truth-seeking and ethical framework; in this view, rapport is an important component for gaining trust and effective communication. Previous research shows that rapport-orientated and non-rapport orientated interview styles result in differences in interviewees’ memory performance and PWB. In the present thesis, a humanitarian rapport-orientated and a dominant non-rapport orientated approach were operationalised based on previous explorative findings of authentic crime victims’ and offenders’ perception of their interviewers as acting in either a humanitarian or dominant manner (Holmberg, 2004; Holmberg & Christianson, 2002). The studies in the present thesis were based on an experimental data collection that consisted of three phases: exposure, interview I (N = 146) and interview II (N = 127; one week and six-month retention period, respectively). Participants were randomly assigned to be interviewed in either a humanitarian rapport-orientated or a non-rapport orientated approach. Basically, it was hypothesised that a humanitarian rapport-oriented approach would increase interviewees’ recall and PWB, and that a dominant non-rapport oriented approach would decrease interviewees’ recall and PWB. Study I assessed the effects of an empirically based model of rapport and a dominant non-rapport orientated approach on adults’ memory performance in an (mock) investigative interview context. Adopting a TJ perspective, Study II described, defined, and measured interviewees’ PWB (Sense of coherence; STAI-S), while Study III investigated the impact of interviewees’ personality (Five-factor model; STAI-T) on their memory performance and PWB. Study IV explored previous findings (Studies I and III) for potential indirect effects of the interview approach on interviewees’ recall, and potential interaction effects between the interview approach and interviewees’ recall as moderated by their personality. Main results showed that a humanitarian rapport-orientated approach, in all essential parts, facilitated interviewees’ recall as well as their psychological well-being, whereas a non-rapport orientated approach, also in all essential parts, hampered interviewees’ recall and contributed to their decreased psychological well-being.

  • 171.
    Madsen, Kent
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame.
    Holmberg, Ulf
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame.
    Interviewees' psychological well-being in investigative interviews: a therapeutic jurisprudential approach2015In: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, ISSN 1321-8719, E-ISSN 1934-1687, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 60-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic jurisprudence sees the law as a social force; its underlying idea is that legal procedures should promote the psychological well-being (PWB) of individuals involved in juridical actions. In this experimental study, 146 subjects were assigned to one of two groups: one undergoing humanitarian rapport interviews, the other undergoing non-rapport interviews. Each group underwent two interviews separated by a six-month interval. The causal effects of interview style on interviewees’ PWB were measured using sense of coherence and StateTrait Anxiety inventories, both pre and post interview at Interviews I and II. Analysis of covariance of scores from both interviews showed interaction effects between interview style and interviewees’ anxiety and sense of coherence, respectively. At Interview I, a non-rapport approach was related to increased anxiety, that is, decreased PWB when comparing pre- and post-interview testing. At Interview II, a humanitarian rapport approach promoted improved sense of coherence, thus, increased PWB. More empirical research on PWB in relation to therapeutic jurisprudence is needed. The discussion focuses on how PWB should be measured in a therapeutic jurisprudential context of investigative interviews.

  • 172.
    Madsen, Kent
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame.
    Holmberg, Ulf
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame.
    Personality affects memory performance and psychological well-being in investigative interviews: a therapeutic jurisprudential approach2015In: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, ISSN 1321-8719, E-ISSN 1934-1687, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 740-755Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) aims to execute legal procedures in ways that promote the psychological well-being (PWB) of the individuals involved. This experimental study investigates the impact of personality on interviewees’ memory performance and PWB from a TJ perspective. PWB was defined by state anxiety (STAI-S) and sense of coherence (SOC). Interviewees’ personalities were assessed using the 10-item short version of the Big Five Inventory (Rammstedt, B., & John, O. P. (2007). Measuring personality in one minute or less: a 10-item short version of the Big Five Inventory in English and German. Journal of Research in Personality, 41, 203!212) and State!Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T; Spielberger, C. D., Gorsuch, R., Lushene, P. R. Vagg, P. R., & Jacobs, G. A. (1983). State!Trait Anxiety Inventory for Adults. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press]. Participants (N D 146) were assigned to undergo either humanitarian rapport interviews or non-rapport interviews. Each group underwent one exposure (computer simulation) and two interviews separated by a 6-month interval. Regression analysis showed that neuroticism (N), openness to experience (O) and extraversion (E) predicted interviewees’ memory performance; N and O were moderated by interview style. Moreover, E and agreeableness (A) predicted higher SOC and lower STAI-S, that is, increased PWB, whereas N predicted lower SOC and elevated levels of STAI-S, that is, lower PWB. In Interviews I and II, STAI- T and a non-rapport approach were a stronger predictor of lower SOC. The results are discussed from a TJ perspective.

  • 173.
    Madsen, Kent
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för psykologi. Åbo Akademi University.
    Santtila, Pekka
    Finland.
    Interview styles, adult's recall and personality in investigative interview settings: mediation and moderation effects2018In: Congent Psychology, ISSN 2331-1908, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have investigated the effects of a humanitarian rapport-orientated and a dominant non-rapport-orientated interview style on the memory performance of adults in two interviews separated by a 6-month interval. Also, the impact of interviewees’ personality on recall was investigated. In the present exploratory study, the data that formed the basis of previous findings were re-analysed for potential indirect effects of interview approach on interviewees’ recall, and for any potential relation between the interview approach and interviewees’ recall as moderated by their personality. Results showed three full mediation effects in the second interview: the rapport index (interviewers’ demeanour) mediated the relation between the interview approach and increased recall; the non-rapport index mediated the relations between the interview approach and decreased recall. Follow-up analyses showed a full mediation effect for the individual items friendliness and cooperation in the rapport index, and for negative attitude, nonchalance, impatience and brusqueness and obstinacy in the non-rapport index. Moreover, the results showed a significant moderation effect; the relationship between the interview approach and confabulated memories being moderated by openness to experience; and a high level of openness was associated with an increase in confabulated memories.

  • 174.
    Martinusen, Linda
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Stråhlen, Sofie
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Attityder till två olika brottstyper och till att hålla förhör med misstänkta gärningsmän2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Attitydens omedvetna effekt är omöjlig att styra, då till exempel känslor såsom ilska, omedvetet kan påverka hur vi reagerar med vår omgivning. Med detta i åtanke undersökte föreliggande experiment huruvida det fanns någon skillnad mellan 44 kvinnor och 42 mäns, ur allmänheten, attityder till att hålla förhör med personer misstänkta för misshandel respektive skattebrott. Halva gruppen undersökningsdeltagare, läste en beskrivning av ett misshandelsfall och den andra gruppen ett skattebrottsfall, varefter deltagarna besvarade frågeformulär om attityder till kriminella respektive attityder till att hålla förhör med brottsmisstänkta personer. En två-vägs variansanalys med män och kvinnor samt brottstyperna som beroende variabler visade att misstänkta för misshandelsbrottet ansågs kunna förhöras med en signifikant lägre grad av humanitet, jämfört med personer misstänkta för skattebrott. En interaktionseffekt förelåg och simple effekt analyser visade att det var kvinnornas resultat som stod för interaktionseffekten. Kvinnorna hade mindre human attityd till våldsbrottslingar jämfört med männen och mer human attityd i förhållande till skattebrottslingar jämfört med männen. Männen visade likvärdig human attityd till både våldsbrottslingar som skattebrottslingar. Generellt negativa attityder till kriminella relaterade signifikant till mindre humana förhörsattityder.

  • 175.
    Marton, Ference
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Wenestam, Claes-GöranGöteborgs universitet.
    Att uppfatta sin omvärld: varför vi förstår verkligheten på olika sätt1984Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 176.
    Marton, Ference
    et al.
    University of Göteborg.
    Wenestam, Claes-Göran
    University of Göteborg.
    Qualitative differences in the understanding and retention of the main point in some texts based on the principle-example structure1978In: Practical aspects of memory: proceedings of the International conference on practical aspects of memory, held under the auspices of the Welsh branch of the British psychological society, in Cardiff from September 4-8, 1978 / [ed] Gruneberg, Michael M., Morris, Peter E., Sykes, Robert N., London: Academic Press , 1978, p. 633-643Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 177.
    Marton, Ference
    et al.
    University of Göteborg.
    Wenestam, Claes-Göran
    University of Göteborg.
    Qualitative differences in retention when a text is read several times1988In: Practical aspects of memory: current research and issues. Vol.2, Clinical and educational implications: proceedings of the 2nd International conference on practical aspects of memory, held under the auspices of the Welsh branch of the British psychological society, in Swansea from August 28 1987 / [ed] Gruneberg, Michael M., Morris, Peter E., Sykes, Robert N., Chichester: Wiley , 1988, p. 370-376Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 178.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    Örebro University.
    Book Reviews: Sparfeldt, Jörn R. (2006). Pädagogische Psychologie und Entwicklungspsychologie, Vol. 55: Berufsinteressen hochbegabter Jugendlicher [Educational psychology and developmental psychology, Vol. 55: Professional interests in highly gifted adolescents]: (D. H. Rost, Series Ed.). Münster, Germany: Waxmann.  277 pages, 25.50 €, ISBN 3-8309-1672-8.2007In: Swiss Journal of Psychology, ISSN 1421-0185, E-ISSN 1662-0879, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 68-69Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 179. Masche, J. Gowert
    Central developmental disorders in children and adolescents: Current findings regarding their origins, treatment and prevention2003In: Psychologie in Erziehung und Unterricht, ISSN 0342-183X, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 411-413Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame.
    Explanation of normative declines in parents’ knowledge about their adolescent children2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: This study searches for developmental mechanisms explaining why parents possess less knowledge about their adolescent children, as these get older. Family processes related to adolescents’ striving for and parents’ granting of autonomy, and adolescents’ relations outside the family might be such developmental mechanisms.

    Methods: A total of 2,415 Swedish adolescents aged 13 to 18 participated in at least two consecutive waves of a five-year time-sequential survey study with annual assessments. Of a sub-sample of 10-16 year-olds, 1,223 parents filled out questionnaires at Times 1 and/or 3. Multi-level analyses were conducted to test whether family process variables and adolescents’ relations outside the family explained intraindividual residual change of parental knowledge, and whether these effects explained normative age variations of knowledge.

    Results: Adolescent-reported parental knowledge declined more and more steeply with age. Adolescents’ reduced disclosure of information and their defiance of parental requests explained about 40 percent of this normative age variation. Other processes such as increasing parental solicitation of information and adolescents’ improved peer relations had an enhancing effect on parental knowledge and thus slowed down the decline of knowledge. Few gender differences occurred.

    Conclusions: Adolescents achieve autonomy from parents by managing information they provide to them and by acting against parental requests. These autonomy-related behaviors explain a large portion of the normative age decline of knowledge. However, increased parental solicitation and improved relations outside the family increasingly contribute to parental knowledge, thus limiting its decline. This suggests that family members balance adolescents’ autonomy and their connectedness with the family.

  • 181.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    Kristianstad University, School of Teacher Education.
    Explanation of normative declines in parents' knowledge about their adolescent children2010In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 271-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explain why parental knowledge of adolescents’ whereabouts declines with age. Such an investigation is important because previous studies have established an association between behavior problems and low levels of parental knowledge. A time-sequential sample comprising 2415 adolescents aged 13–18 years was investigated on five annual occasions. Each year, parental knowledge declined by .10 SD. Adolescents’ establishment of a private sphere (less disclosure; defiance) was the most important mediator of age effects on knowledge. Taken together, declining parental control and the establishment of a private sphere explained 37.5% of the age-related decline in knowledge. Parental control was, however, not a significant predictor any longer when disclosure and defiance were controlled for. Results also revealed that some of the mediating variables were stronger in early-to-mid adolescence. Other variables appeared to slow the age-related decline, especially in mid-to-late adolescence. These variables are therefore interpreted as parents’ and adolescents’ attempts to balance autonomy development and connectedness. If this balancing fails, adolescent behavior problems might arise along with low levels of parental knowledge early on.

  • 182.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame.
    Five years later: effects of parenting styles and parent-adolescent relationships on young adults’ well-being2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents can support their adolescent child’s psychosocial development by a parenting style which is warm and involved, firm and consistent, and which grants psychological autonomy (the freedom to have one’s own thoughts and feelings). Psychological autonomy granting is regarded as particularly beneficial for the prevention of anxiety, depression, or other kinds of internalizing distress (McLeod, et al., 2007; Steinberg, 2001). However, longitudinal research has produced mixed evidence (Birmaher, et al., 2000; Colarossi & Eccles, 2003; Galambos et al., 2003; Steinberg, et al., 1994). Even less is known on long-term effects into young adulthood. Besides parental behaviors, also the parent-adolescent relationship might be important. Teens who feel close to their parents and who communicate frequently with them might experience a “secure base” which protects against depression and fosters the children’s well-being even in the future. Thus, this study examined reciprocal effects between parenting styles (psychological control and affection) and the parent-adolescent relationship (felt closeness to and communication with parents) and emotional, social and psychological well-being, and depression.

    This study used the 2002, 2005, and 2007 waves of an ongoing longitudinal study, representative for the USA. Out of 1,319 adolescents aged 11-19 in 2002, 575 young adults, then 18-22 years old were re-interviewed in 2005. By 2007, more adolescents had reached young adulthood, thus, 878 young adults of age 18-24 were re-interviewed in 2007. Also 224 of the originally youngest adolescents were re-interviewed in 2007 as a separate sample. Parenting styles were assessed in the adolescent data collections 2002 and 2007, and parent-child relationships and well-being at all occasions.

    Albeit adolescents’ perceptions of mothers’ and fathers’ parenting styles were highly correlated, specific effects on well-being occurred in cross-lagged regression analyses. Maternal psychological control in 2002 predicted lowered levels of emotional and social well-being and elevated levels of depression in 2005 (β’s = -.10, -.08, and .11, resp.). In part, these effects were found even after five years in 2007. Maternal support did not have any significant effects. For fathers, only one effect was found, of psychological control 2002 on depressive symptoms 2007 (β = .08). Measures of the parent-adolescent relationship did not predict well-being, with the exception of communication to mothers in 2002 which predicted emotional well-being in 2005.

    In the opposite direction of effects, depression predicted maternal psychological control five years later (β = .18, p = .023), despite the smaller sample of still adolescent respondents. Also some effects of parenting and of well-being on the parent-young adult relationship occurred.

    In conclusion, advice to parents might focus on how to avoid psychologically controlling behaviors, especially for mothers were these might conflict most with North-American gender roles. Future research should investigate why such detrimental behaviors occur in response to adolescents’ emotional problems. That parental support as a general style proved unimportant does not mean that support never would be needed: It might be that in key situations of danger or adolescent problems, adolescents need the impression that parents care, and not only abstain from psychological control (Olsson & Wik, 2009).

  • 183.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    Örebro universitet.
    Parent-child relations and parenting behaviors with children at the age of 13 and 16: Individuation or detachment?2006In: Zeitschrift für Soziologie der Erziehung und Sozialisation / Journal for Sociology of Education and Socialization, ISSN 1436-1957, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 7-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to Individuation Theory, adolescents become more and more autonomous while the level of parent-adolescent connectedness is constant. However, connectedness is hypothesized to attain a more reciprocal, peer-like quality. These assumptions were tested using a sample of 968 students of ages 13 and 16 The sample was quite representative with respect to the various German school tracks. Besides effects of age on the relationship, corresponding age differences in the levels of authoritative parenting (affection, behavior control, and psychological autonomy granting) were investigated. At age 16, adolescents claimed more autonomy from parents, and parents had less knowledge of their offspring's life. The parent-adolescent connectedness remained fairly constant across age, that is, it did not change towards reciprocity. Older participants experienced less paternal support than younger subjects. With age, parental behavior control decreased. Fathers also were less affective with increasing age of participants. The father-adolescent relationship was less close than the mother-adolescent relationship, especially for girls. Furthermore, school track differences were revealed. The results are discussed with respect to Individuation Theory and notions of detachment.

  • 184.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    Kristianstad University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Reciprocal influences between developmental transitions and parent-child relationships in young adulthood2008In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 401-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inconsistent findings exist on the effects of young adult-parent relationships on developmental status transitions into adulthood. Such transitions in turn predicted less conflicted and closer young adult-parent relationships. But systematic investigations of reciprocal effects between developmental transitions and young adult-parent relationships are lacking. A total of 477 participants initially aged 20-32 (M = 23.9, SD = 1.5) were interviewed twice, once in 1993 and again in 1995/1996. Subsamples were drawn that had not yet undergone the transitions to work, leaving home, cohabitation with a romantic partner, marriage and parenthood at Time 1. It was assessed whether the levels of mutual trust, instrumentality of relationships, and critical discussions at Time 1 predicted developmental transitions by Time 2, and whether developmental transitions were followed by changes in the relationship measures. The more the participants trusted in their parents, the more likely they were to marry or to have children. Cohabitation was followed by decreased instrumentality. Higher discussion frequency predicted cohabitation and was a consequence of starting to work and leaving home. The results are discussed with regard to individuation theory of adolescent and young adult-parent relationship development.

  • 185.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame.
    Revisiting Barber's behavioral control: an action-theoretical interpretation of ascribed parental knowledge2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Barber (e.g., 1996, 2005) has proposed that parental behavioral control has a unique effect on adolescents’ normbreaking, even if psychological control and support are statistically controlled.  Barber uses a scale of parental knowledge as a measure of behavioral control.  However, parental knowledge and normbreaking are more closely associated with adolescents’ free disclosure of information than with behavioral control.  Moreover, disclosure explains part of the association between knowledge and normbreaking, whereas behavioral control does not (Kerr & Stattin, 2000; Stattin & Kerr, 2000).  This makes parental knowledge a questionable measure of behavioral control, and it suggests that family communication and relationship processes affect normbreaking more than behavioral control does.  However, Kerr and Stattin did not specifically test Barber’s theory.  They did not statistically control psychological control and support which might have “cleaned” parental knowledge of its relationship and communication-associated facets and thus might have left a more valid measure of parental control.  Thus, the first aim of this study is to test whether the unique association of parental knowledge with adolescent normbreaking, after controlling psychological control and parental support, can be explained by parental behavioral control—as Barber proposes—or rather by family relationship processes—as Stattin and Kerr suggest.

    Given previous empirical findings (e.g., Kerr & Stattin, 2000; Stattin & Kerr, 2000), interpreting parental knowledge as an index of relationship properties or as behavioral control might both be insufficient.  As an alternative, this paper takes an action-theoretical perspective and views parental knowledge as an expectancy in an expectancy-value model.  The extent to which adolescents ascribe knowledge about themselves to their parents can be seen as adolescents’ expectancy that the parents will gain knowledge about their actions.  A value that together with this expectancy might predict less adolescent normbreaking is adolescents’ desire to please and comfort their parents.  According to Individuation Theory (Youniss & Smollar, 1985), this is a common desire among adolescents.  If adolescents expect their parents will be knowledgeable about their activities, and if they do not want to worry them, they might engage in less normbreaking than adolescents who either do not care about their parents’ worries or who expect that the parents will not know about their normbreaking.  The second aim of this study is to test this interaction effect on normbreaking.

    A German sample of 968 13- and 16-year-olds filled out questionnaires at school.  Scales for parental knowledge, psychological control, parental support, and normbreaking were identical to Barber’s (2005) study.  Behavioral control was measured with scales for spare-time control (curfew rules, low laissez-faire), school control, and harsh punishments.  Family relationship processes were tapped by scales of parental warmth and openness and of adolescents’ caring for their parents.  The latter measure aimed at assessing family processes similar to those covered by Kerr and Stattin’s scale of free disclosure of information.  Finally, the desire to please and comfort their parents was measured with a newly developed scale.  All measures evinced adequate psychometric properties.

    Concerning the first aim of this study, parental knowledge was strongly related to low normbreaking (Model 0), even after controlling psychological control and parental support (Model 1).  Although the various facets of behavioral control were associated with normbreaking (Model 0), only punishments explained a small part of the effect of parental knowledge (Model 2c).  But punishments were inversely related to parental knowledge and predicted more instead of less normbreaking.  Out of the two family relationship process variables, caring for parents explained a small part of the effect of parental knowledge (Model 2e).  In total, however, the largest part of the effect of parental knowledge remained unexplained (Model 3).  Thus, the results do not support Barber’s idea that parental knowledge is an index of behavioral control.  The findings support Stattin and Kerr’s (2000, Kerr & Stattin, 2000) critique of knowledge as a measure of behavioral control.  However, also family relationship processes explained only little of the association between parental knowledge and normbreaking.

    The results testing the expectancy-value model of parental knowledge and the desire to please the parents, explaining low normbreaking, were as follows.  Parental knowledge, the desire to please the parents, and their interaction predicted low normbreaking (if latent main effect factors were scaled to SD = 1, beta = –.39, –.22, and ‑.06, resp., all p’s < .05).  The stronger the desire to please the parents, the steeper the decline of normbreaking with increasing parental knowledge.  Most adolescents desired strongly to please their parents.  However, results suggest almost no effect of parental knowledge if adolescents have no desire to please their parents.  In summary, the proposed expectancy-value model is supported by the data.

    Barber has described parenting as a unidirectional process.  This description rests on studies using parental knowledge as an index for parental behaviors.  As in previous studies, this interpretation of parental knowledge is not supported.  This paper provides initial support for a new view on parental knowledge:  Adolescents actively decide about what they do, in the light of what they expect the consequences to be and how they evaluate them.

  • 186.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame. Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    You Can Check Out any Time You Like, But You Can Never Leave: Psychological Control of Teens Predicts Young Adults’ Depression2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental support predicts low levels of depression in teenagers, and psychological control high levels. However, this pattern holds true for cross-sectional research only whereas longitudinal support is mixed at best. Moreover, few studies have investigated long-term effects into young adulthood. This study explores effects of teenagers’ experienced parental support and psychological control on depression and parent-child relationships in young adulthood, three and five years later. It also explores parental behaviors as outcomes of teen depression. Out of 1,319 U.S. American adolescents aged 11-19 in 2002, those who had reached young adulthood by 2005 (n = 575) and 2007 (n = 878), respectively, were re-interviewed. Also the youngest participants, who still were in adolescence, took part in 2007 (n = 224). In cross-lagged panel regressions, maternal psychological control predicted depression and low well-being over time whereas maternal support predicted close parent-child relationships. For the youngest participants, effects on parenting were tested, and depression predicted increased maternal psychological control after five years. Only few effects were found for fathers. These findings suggest that psychological control does not make young adults withdraw from the relationship, despite their increased independence. Instead, they still expose themselves to this parenting behavior, resulting in increased depression. Depression also contributes to psychological control, resulting in a vicious circle of maternal psychological control and youth depression. Parental support in contrast is linked to relationship closeness over time, but largely unrelated to both depression and psychological control. The differential roles of psychological control and support will be discussed further.

  • 187.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame. Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Burk, William
    Universiteit Leiden (NL), Social and Behavioural Sciences.
    “I Don’t Tell You!”: Do Parent-Adolescent Interaction Problems Cause Both Low Parental Knowledge and Adolescent Internalizing?2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paradoxically, knowledge that parents posses about their adolescent children’s activities declines with age, but low levels of knowledge are associated with externalizing and internalizing problems. Might there only be a small group of adolescents with steeply declining parental knowledge? Or, are interindividual differences in knowledge and its normative decline independent of each other? This study will explore different trajectories of knowledge in order to answer this question.

    Second, why is low parental knowledge associated with adolescent problems? Focusing on internalizing problems, does parental knowledge really predict them over time, or do they reduce parental knowledge, for example because a depressed or unconfident adolescent tends to withdraw from conversation? This study will determine the direction of effects.

    Third, if parental knowledge predicts internalizing problems, why is this so? Previous studies suggest that both knowledge and internalizing might result from family interaction processes (Kerr & Stattin, 2000), but the same results could also be read as mediation from knowledge via family interactions to internalizing. Furthermore, knowledge was only partly explained by parent-adolescent interaction processes, lending doubt to the interpretation of parental knowledge as a mere expression of them (Barber, 2005). Thus, parental knowledge might either be an indicator of parent-adolescent communication or a causal factor in its own. This study will contribute to clarification. Aversive parental behaviors and adolescent non-disclosure and oppositional behavior were chosen as predictors because they belong to problematic parent-adolescent interactions and because of their links to adolescent internalizing problems.

    A representative Swedish community sample of 1,744 adolescents of age 10-14 at T0 was re-assessed at four annual occasions T1-4. Each year, adolescents filled out questionnaires at school.

    Using Growth Mixture Modeling, three trajectories of parental knowledge, and two trajectories each of self-esteem and depression were revealed across T1-4. The three knowledge trajectories differed in level, but each trajectory had virtually the same age decline.

    In all subsequent analyses, the effects of predictor variables at T0 on T1-4 trajectories of either knowledge or depression, or self-esteem were tested, above and beyond the stability of the respective dependent variable since T0. These analyses revealed effects of parental knowledge on trajectories of depression and self-esteem, but not vice versa.

    A conceptual model was concluded from a series of analyses including parent-adolescent interaction variables. If parents exerted aversive behaviors such as being harsh or making fun of their children, these disclosed not much information and behaved oppositional which in turn predicted low levels of parental knowledge. Although knowledge had predicted adolescent depression and low self-esteem when entered in the analyses alone, it did not consistently predict these variables if adolescents’ opposition and non-disclosure were taken into account.

    In conclusion, the normative decline of parental knowledge and interindividual differences are two independent phenomena which might have different causes. This study has contributed to an understanding of how parent-adolescent interactions lead to interindividual differences in knowledge. Low levels of knowledge were not a consistent causal factor for adolescent internalizing symptoms, but clearly indicated parent-adolescent problems.

  • 188.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Hansson, Erika
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame. Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Lunds universitet.
    It takes two to tango: teen internalizing and exter­nalizing problems are predicted by the interaction of parent and teen behaviors2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Associations between parenting behaviors of support, behavior control and overcontrol, and psychological control/disrespect with adolescent internalizing and externalizing problems have been studied extensively (Barber et al., 2012; Kerr & Stattin, 2000), and also adolescent behaviors of disclosure and secrecy in the context of these problems (Frijns et al., 2010). However, few studies have assessed how parent and child behaviors might moderate each other’s associations with problems (Keijsers et al., 2009). This study investigates interaction effects of the above-mentioned parent and adolescent behaviors when predicting depression, loneliness, and low self-esteem (internalizing), and delinquency, aggression, and drug/alcohol use (externalizing). Given the variety of behaviors and problems under study, it is hypothesized that various kinds of moderation effects will emerge.

    An ethnically diverse sample of 1,281 adolescents attending grades 7 to 10 in a Southern Swedish municipality (age 12.5 to 19.3, M = 15.2, SD = 1.2) filled out questionnaires in class. All scales have been published internationally; however, some items were added to short scales. Each of the internalizing and externalizing problems was regressed on all possible combinations of one of the four parenting variables and one of the two adolescent behaviors under study, resulting in 48 regression analyses.

    Confirming previous findings, parent psychological control and overcontrol were associated with internalizing and externalizing problems, and behavior control and insufficient support with internalizing problems. Adolescent disclosure predicted low levels of both kinds of problems and secrecy predicted high levels. Two-way interactions of parent and adolescent behaviors added significantly (p < .05) to the variance in 13 of 48 analyses which is beyond chance level (p < .001). In addition to the inspection of significant effects, t-values across all analyses were analyzed in order to distinguish between more general trends and solitary effects on specific internalizing or externalizing problems only. Confirming the hypothesis, interaction effects varied across the combinations of parent and adolescent behaviors (η2 = .26) and were further moderated by the distinction between internalizing and externalizing problems (η2 = .38). These effects were grouped into five kinds of interaction effects: In mutually enhancing and mutually exacerbating effects, two positive or two negative, respectively, behaviors increased each other’s associations with problem levels. In protection effects, usually adolescents’ behavior reduced associations between negative parenting and problems. Relationship split effects might reflect an alienated parent-adolescent relationship in which negative behaviors cannot do much additional harm. Finally, maintained relationship/sabotage means that the lowest level of problems occurred if one generation maintained the relationship by a positive behavior and the other generation abstained from “sabotaging” it by a negative behavior. Otherwise, problem behaviors increased sharply without the other generation’s behavior having any large effect any longer.

    In conclusion, analyses provide ample evidence that adolescents’ behavior moderates links between parents’ behaviors and adolescents’ internalizing and externalizing problems. Possible causal interpretations include adolescents as “gatekeepers” of parenting efforts, families’ functional and dysfunctional adaptations, and parent and child behavior combinations as consequences of internalizing and externalizing problems.

  • 189.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame.
    Olsson, Mimmi
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Wik, Sandra
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    How to foster depression: bother your adolescent child all the time, but leave it alone when it needs you2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is there another way to predict adolescents’ depressive symptoms than by trait-like parenting characteristics, such as affective support (Barber, Stolz, & Olsen, 2005)? Drawing from a systems perspective (Lollis & Kuczynski, 1997) and Social Domain Theory (Smetana & Asquith, 1994), this paper suggests that parental responses in key situations might be important for the development of adolescent depression: (a) adolescent-parent conflict; (b) dangerous situations; (c) need of help with a problem. These three situations require steering adolescents’ behaviors in a responsive way, i.e., combinations of demandingness and responsiveness. Thus, the roles of authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, and indifferent parental responses in these key situations will be rested.

    In order to have a standard of comparison, well-established parenting styles (Barber, et al., 2005; Steinberg, 2001) will be evaluated, too. Lack of support has been found to predict depressive symptoms. The prediction by behavior control and the support-by-control interaction will be tested as well, for a better comparability to the test of parental responses in specific situations.

    A total of 108 Swedish adolescents aged 14-15 (67 girls, 41 boys) filled out questionnaires at school. For depressive symptoms and parental support, well-established American scales were used. Behavior control was measured by scales tapping parental control and solicitation of information, respectively. 3 (situations) by 4 (parental responses) by 2 (parent genders) scales of parental responses in key situations were newly developed. For each type of situations, the respondents received two typical examples (e.g., having problems with a friend or a girlfriend/boyfriend as an example of a problem) and rated the frequencies of various parental responses. Because all mother and father scales were highly correlated, they were standardized and added (complementary analyses with either mother or father data yielded similar results; so did analyses including adolescent gender).

    Parental responses in key situations explained 30% of variance of adolescent depression. Authoritative responses to problems were associated with low levels of depression. Moreover, indifferent responses to all three kinds of situations predicted higher levels of depression.

    Main effects of parenting style variables explained 14% of the variance of depression. Adding the interactions between support and parental control and solicitation explained additional 8% of variance. Most of this effect was due to an interaction between acceptance and solicitation. Authoritarian parenting predicted the highest depression levels whereas supportive styles predicted low depression. When entering either reactions in key situation first into the regression equation and parenting styles next, or vice versa, each of them predicted significant portions of variance above and beyond the other. However, reactions in key situations produced the larger increase in explained variance.

    Albeit cross-sectional data do not allow for causal conclusions, this study has generated important hypotheses for future studies: If parents constantly bother their adolescent child with requests to talk about something, in combination with low levels of support, the child is likely to show elevated levels of depression. Even more deleterious might be adolescents’ experience to be left alone when they need their parents.

  • 190.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame. Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Oud, Johan H. L.
    Radboud University Nijmegen (NL).
    Modeling of causal influences in the family in discrete and continuous time2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 191.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame.
    Persson, Kristina
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Löfgren, Malin
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Do parents only have to avoid being nasty, or should they even be nice?: the case of adolescent substance use and deviance2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, parents’ firm and consistent behavior control has been regarded as effective protection against adolescents’ drug use and delinquency (Steinberg, 2001). However, the validity of findings has been questioned (Stattin & Kerr, 2000; Kerr & Stattin, 2000). The widely-used indicator of behavior control, parental knowledge, appears rather to reflect a trusting relationship (Masche, 2010). However, little is known about which facets of the relationship are most important: Is it more “nasty,” guilt inducing and interfering behavior, i.e. psychological control, which leads to substance use and deviance? Or is it parents’ ability to be “nice” and create close family relations marked by solidarity that prevents these problem behaviors?

    A total of 143 adolescents attending grade 9 (age 15-16, 58% male) in two medium-sized Swedish cities filled out questionnaires at school. Scales on alcohol and drug use focused on frequency and intensity of use and on symptoms of substance abuse. The deviance scale ranged from minor delinquency to violent acts. Adolescents answered also scales on their experienced relationship quality to their parents, on parents’ psychological control and behavior control (e.g., needing permission before going out on the evening). Mother and father scales were summed because of their high inter-correlations. Drug consumption was generally low, and several items did not even vary between participants. Still, all scales were sufficiently reliable (α’s ≥ .80). Because 44% of the sample had other than Swedish ethnic background – in most instances were the parents born in the Middle East –, ethnicity, gender, and their interaction were included into the analyses, but did not predict substance use or deviance.

    Although alcohol use and deviance were highly correlated, these two problem behaviors were somewhat differently associated with parenting and relationship variables: Adolescents who consumed a lot of alcohol tended to have poor relationships to psychologically controlling parents. However, deviant adolescents reported in the first place psychologically controlling parents and only to a lesser degree also a poor relationship quality. Drug use (which generally was low) was only associated with psychological control. Multiple regression analyses revealed whether each parenting and relationship variable uniquely predicted substance use and deviance. The results were similar to the bivariate correlations, confirming the general importance of psychological control. Relationship quality still predicted low alcohol use, but was not any longer important for deviance when controlled for psychological control. Behavior control did not predict any of these problem behaviors in any analysis.

    This study confirms findings questioning the role of behavior control (Kerr & Stattin, 2000; Stattin & Kerr, 2000). It tells what might be important instead. Hostile, guilt-inducing behavior was consistently associated with externalizing problems whereas a close relationship showed more specific associations. To the degree that parents affect adolescents’ externalizing behaviors rather than are affected by them, these findings suggest that parents above all should avoid being “nasty,” i.e. psychologically controlling. Being “nice,” i.e., to contribute to a close companionship with their children, also appears important, but more specifically against alcohol consumption.  

  • 192.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    et al.
    Technische Universität Darmstadt, Tyskland.
    Pulido, J A
    Scheele-Heubach, C A
    Influences between parents and adolescents during the transition from middle school to the next stage of school or professional education2003In: Psychologie in Erziehung und Unterricht, ISSN 0342-183X, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 152-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to individuation theory of parent-adolescent relationships, the primary parent-child hierarchy is gradually replaced by a peer-like reciprocity of parents and adolescents. However, it is questioned whether a peer-like relationship is the aim of development. Within a time span of about half a year, 41 families with school leavers after 10th grade of non college-bound school track were interrogated three times, regarding their mutual influences. Between-subject factors were the kind of educational transition (into professional training vs. to a different school track) and. the existence of younger and of older siblings. According to the family members' statements, parental influences prevailed at all time points. Both generations influenced each other for the adolescents' benefit, especially concerning school and career. Further results indicated that greater mutuality in the parent-child relationship was more intensively pursued by the parents rather than by the adolescents.

  • 193.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    et al.
    Technische Universität Darmstadt Institut für Psychologie, Darmstadt, Germany.
    Pulido, Josefina Almagro
    Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany.
    Scheele-Heubach, Claudia A.
    Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany.
    Einflussnahmen zwischen Eltern und Jugendlichen im Übergang von der Realschule in die nächste schulische oder berufliche Ausbildung2003In: Psychologie in Erziehung und Unterricht, ISSN 0342-183X, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 152-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to individuation theory of parent-adolescent relationships, the primary parent-child hierarchy is gradually replaced by a peer-like reciprocity of parents and adolescents. However, it is questioned whether a peer-like relationship is the aim of development. Within a time span of about half a year, 41 families with school leavers after 10th grade of non college-bound school track were interrogated three times, regarding their mutual influences. Between-subject factors were the kind of educational transition (into professional training vs. to a different school track) and the existence of younger and of older siblings. According to the family members' statements, parental influences prevailed at all time points. Both generations influenced each other for the adolescents' benefit, especially concerning school and career. Further results indicated that greater mutuality in the parent-child relationship was more intensively pursued by the parents rather than by the adolescents.

  • 194.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame.
    Siotis, Camilla
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame.
    Barns cyklande på båda sidor om Öresund: en vetenskaplig undersökning inom projektet Öresund som cykelregion2011Report (Other academic)
  • 195.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO).
    Siotis, Camilla
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame.
    Faktorer i samband med barns cyklande till skolan och till fritidsaktiviteter2013In: Idrottsforskaren, ISSN 0348-9787, no 1, p. 55-69Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Föräldrar och barn till 962 familjer med elever i årskurserna 2, 4, 6 och 9 fyllde i enkäter om barns cyklande till skolan och till fritidsaktiviteter, i syftet att få kunskap om möjliga bakomliggande faktorer. Förutom lokala förhållanden som återspeglas i skillnader mellan deltagande skolorna hade föräldrars förebild som cyklister och barns egna cykelvanor de starkaste samband med barns cyklande, dessutom i viss mån barns och föräldrars attityder. Artikeln drar slutsatser om möjliga strategier för att öka barns säkra cyklande.

  • 196.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO).
    Siotis, Camilla
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön ForFame.
    The winding road to autonomy: 8-15 year-olds’ use of private and public transportation to school and spare-time activities2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As children grow up, they expand their territorial range (Andrews, 1973). This increasing autonomy allows them for reaching new places of activities, thereby attaining further developmental tasks. However, less is known about what children and adolescents do that makes them familiar with an increasing area. Various means such as walking, riding a bicycle, taking a bus or getting a lift by car differ in the mobility and the knowledge about the environment they provide (Rissotto & Tonucci, 2002) and in the motor, perceptual, and cognitive skills required to use them. Thus, these means of transportation may not only be tools for autonomy development, but becoming able to use them might be a part of autonomy development (Bullens et al., 2010). Thus, the frequencies of walking, riding a bicycle or a bus, and of being given a lift by the parents, will be explored in two domains: transportation to school and to spare-time activities. The former focuses on the use of means of transportation to a mandatory destination whereas the latter explores the twofold autonomy to make use of a means of transportation and to access targets which might change with age.

    A total of 715 children (54.4% girls) attending grades 4, 6, and 9 (ages 10, 12, and 15) and 497 parents of children (51.5% girls) attending grades 2, 4, and 6 (ages 8, 10, and 12) filled out questionnaires. Both parents and children indicated on how many days of the week the child walked, cycled, took the bus, and was driven to school and to free-time activities, respectively. Multilevel analyses were used because participants were nested in 16 schools which were nested in 6 municipalities in adjacent regions of Denmark and Southern Sweden. Predictor variables were grade, gender (dummy-coded), and distance to school (four categories, recoded to approximate kilometers). In the next step, country was added into equations, in order to explain part of the variance between municipalities. Finally, theoretically meaningful interactions between grade, gender, and distance from school were added. The final model for each dependent variable was the one with the best fit (AIC, BIC). Variables had been transformed to approach normal distribution.

    Walking and riding the bicycle (especially in girls) were mainly used for shorter distances. In contrast, bus and the family car were used for more distant destinations. Danish children used more active, individual ways of transportation whereas Swedish children used public transport. Girls tended to use more passive means such as being driven by car or riding the bus whereas boys, at least at certain ages, walked more or rode their bicycles. Although age effects were similar on a global level, such as that children depended less of their parents’ help to get somewhere, details differed. The youngest children did not any longer need the car ride to school, but it were the oldest ones who did not any longer get lifts to spare-time activities nearby. Thus, age trends in how to get to school did not explain age trends in accessing spare-time activities. On the contrary, when controlling for getting lifts to school, the absence of net age effects in parent-reported car rides turned out to be the sum of the opposite trends towards independence from parents and towards having more destinations to reach.

    The results show that children choose varying means of transportation according to their development of needs and skills. The differences between the age trends for the two types of destinations suggest a larger flexibility than known previously. Still, gender and cultural differences affect this facet of autonomy development.

  • 197.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    et al.
    Institute of Psychology, Darmstadt University of Technology.
    van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.
    Advances in disentangling age, cohort, and time effects: no quadrature of the circle, but a help2004In: Developmental Review, ISSN 0273-2297, E-ISSN 1090-2406, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 322-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Based on Schaie's (1965) general developmental model, various data-driven and theory-based approaches to the exploration and disentangling of age, cohort, and time effects on human behavior have emerged. This paper presents and discusses an advancement of data-driven interpretations that stresses parsimony when interpreting the results of sequential models. Second, a synthesis of data-driven and theory-based approaches examines the specific predictors of patterns of cross-sectional, longitudinal, and time-lag differences. This approach is exemplified with data from two cross-sectional samples. In 1991 and 1996, representative samples of 13- to 29-year-old Germans were interviewed orally. Parts of these samples were analyzed employing a time-sequential and a cross-sequential strategy (analyzed N=6105). While the data-driven approach allowed for two alternative interpretations, the second approach revealed that parental emotional help for their children declined with age, partly due to the children leaving home. Help provided for parents generally increased with age, however, leaving home had the opposite effect so that overall, only small and inconsistent age increases in help for parents were found.

  • 198.
    Masche-No, J. Gowert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Adolescent internalizing symptoms worsen parenting and the parent-adolescent relationship quality, but hardly the other way around2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological control and lack of warmth are widely assumed to cause internalizing symptoms in adolescents (Hunter et al., 2015; Steinberg, 2001). However, most research has been cross-sectional, and longitudinal findings have been mixed (e.g., White et al., 2015) or the used statistical methods were not optimal to support causal conclusions (Hunter et al., 2015). Only few studies have inspected child effects on parenting (Brenning et al., 2015). Thus, evidence is lacking on whether parenting style affects adolescent internalizing symptoms such as depression, loneliness, and poor self-esteem. Moreover, from a systems perspective, further factors should be explored such as adolescents’ and parents’ perceptions of each other, goals, and strategies to change their mutual relationship. This study examines bidirectional effects of all these facets of parent-adolescent relationships and parenting behaviors and adolescent internalizing symptoms.

    Using two annual data collections (N = 1,281/1,274/824 at T1/T2/overlap, resp.) in a representative Swedish community sample of adolescents originally in grades 7-10 (Mage = 15.2, SD = 1.2), effects of perceived parenting (warmth, psychological control, behavior control, overcontrol), adolescent relationship satisfaction, goals (establishing autonomy, submission under parental authority), and strategies (disclosure, secrecy) on internalizing problems (depression symptoms, loneliness, low self-esteem) and vice versa were examined, controlling for the respective dependent variable at T1, gender, and school grade. Parental attitudes (e.g., perceived child depression, satisfaction, and feelings of giving up) were assessed at T2 in a sub-sample (N = 290), allowing for the prediction of these attitudes by T1 internalizing. In order to preserve as much information as possible, missing data were multiply imputed (20 datasets), reaching over 95% efficiency of analyses. Still, those analyses involving parent attitudes are tentative due to the lack of T1 measures and the large number of missing data, reducing power and introducing bias if data were not missing at random (e.g., non-response of dissatisfied parents being not entirely predicted by adolescent data).

    Consistent with and expanding previous research, most parenting and parent-adolescent relationship variables were cross-sectionally correlated with adolescent internalizing symptoms (see Table 1). In most instances of significant within-time associations, also the predictions over time of the respective parenting and parent-adolescent relationship variables by teen internalizing symptoms were significant (Table 1). In contrast, only three effects in the opposite direction reached or approached significance: feelings of being overly controlled by parents increased depression and tentatively reduced self-esteem, and low child disclosure increased loneliness. Supporting a systems perspective, parent-reported feelings of giving up and of low relationship satisfaction mediated effects of adolescent depression on e.g. reduced warmth and increased psychological control over time.

    Thus, the study has shown broad deteriorating effects of teen internalizing on parenting and parent-adolescent relationship quality and has provided first evidence of mediation by parent cognitions and feelings. However, parenting effects on internalizing were sparse and involved other than the expected variables. If adolescents felt overly controlled by their parents, they became depressed and their self-esteem was tentatively reduced. And if they did not disclose much information to their parents, they became lonelier over time.

  • 199.
    Masche-No, Johanna G.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Psykologi.
    Hur hänger inåtvända problem och utagerande beteenden hos ton­åringar ihop med deras föräldrarelation?2017In: Barnsliga sammanhang: Forskning om barns och ungdomars hälsa, välbefinnande och delaktighet / [ed] Bo Nilsson och Eva Clausson, Kristianstad: Kristianstad University Press , 2017, 1, p. 91-110Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 200.
    Masche-No, Johanna G.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Psykologi.
    Steinberg knew it: authoritative parenting does affect teen externalizing problems. But how does it work?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on preventive effects of authoritative parenting against externalizing problems (Steinberg, 2001) has been criticized for invalid measurements of parental control (Stattin & Kerr, 2000), and that findings might reflect parental reactions rather than parental influences (Glatz et al., 2012; Kerr et al., 2012). However, few studies have assessed bidirectional effects between parenting and externalizing problems, and even less have attempted to explore how the parent-adolescent relationship might mediate these effects from a systems perspective.

    Using two annual data collections (N = 1,281/1,274/824 at T1/T2/overlap, resp.) in a representative Swedish community sample of adolescents originally in grades 7-10 (Mage = 15.2, SD = 1.2), bi-directional effects between perceived parenting (warmth, psychological control, behavior control, overcontrol), adolescent relationship satisfaction, goals (establishing autonomy, submission under parental authority), and strategies (disclosure, secrecy), and externalizing problem behaviors (drug/alcohol use, delinquency, aggression) were explored, controlling for the respective dependent variable at T1, gender, and school grade. Parental attitudes (e.g., perceived child depression, satisfaction, and feelings of giving up) were assessed at T2 in a sub-sample (N = 290), allowing for the prediction of these attitudes by T1 externalizing. Missing data were multiply imputed. Still, those analyses involving parent attitudes are tentative due to the lack of T1 measures and the large number of missing data.

    Cross-sectionally, all three externalizing behaviors were modestly associated with parenting and relationships in expected directions. However, despite large correlations between the three externalizing behaviors, longitudinal predictions differed. Aggression was not predicted and did not predict parenting and parent-adolescent relationships across time, suggesting that aggression develops at younger age.

    Both delinquency and drug/alcohol use predicted parents’ feelings of low satisfaction, poor trust, and of giving up, but none of the adolescent-reported parenting behaviors. Unexpected predictions of high submission under parental authority and of low secrecy by drug/alcohol use could be explained by a statistical suppressor effect. Thus, although parents felt bad about their externalizing children, this did not result in deteriorated parenting as observed by the adolescents, in contrast to previous research (Kerr & Stattin, 2003), and unlike parents’ reactions to internalizing problems in this study.

    Supporting parenting effects, low levels of delinquency were predicted by parental overcontrol and tentatively by parental control. Low drug/alcohol use was predicted by parental support, adolescents’ goals rather not to become autonomous but to submit under parental authority, disclosure of information, and low secrecy towards parents. Mediation analyses revealed that adolescents react to parental support by intentions to submit under parental authority and becoming less secretive, which both predicted decreased drug/alcohol use over time. The preventive effect of parental (over-)control against delinquency was found using scales developed by the Stattin/Kerr group rather than the questioned “monitoring” scale. Albeit no direct effect of control on low drug/alcohol use was revealed, a preventive effect of parental support was explained by adolescents’ willingness to accept parental authority and not to keep secrets from them. These findings support a parent-effects theory of authoritative parenting (Steinberg, 2001) and help understand how adolescents’ goals and behaviors mediate parental behaviors.

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