hkr.sePublikationer
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1 - 18 av 18
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Lenninger, Sara
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola.
    Iconic attitude and how similar is similarity2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Pictures and other visio-spatial signs with iconicity diverge in expression, and in how they operate on meaning. Like all signs, pictures are polysemous (Groupe µ 1992) and have several layers of meaning - such as being perceptual objects and signs, having pragmatic and contextual meanings etc. (Medin et al 1993; Tversky 1977). Pictures also rely on iconic meaning (Sonesson 1989). Similarity is a predominant feature in iconic signs – however similarity is not a single kind of relationship. The relevance of similarities differs. Sometimes, but not always, perception of similarities is tightly coupled to the conception of a sign relation. Important in this presentation, is the point that via the sign relation one may gain insight into structurally different organizations of similarity relations. A concept of Iconic Attitude (Lenninger 2019) is presented and discussed as a Phenomenal outlook that responds to the qualities in the iconic ground and thus may “manifest” a visual generalization in a specific sign perception.

    Goodman, N. 1972. Seven strictures on similarity. In Problems and projects, 437–446. Indianapolis/New York: Bobbs-Merrill.

    Groupe µ (1992). Traité du signe visuel. Pour une rhétorique de l'image. Paris: Seuil.

    Medin, D. L, Goldstone, R. L., & Gentner, D. (1993). Respects for Similarity. Psychological Review, 100(2), 254-278.

    Lenninger, S. (2019). The metaphor and the iconic attitude. Cognitive Semiotics, 12(1).

    Sonesson, G. (1989). Pictorial Concepts: inquiries into the semiotic heritage and its relevance to the interpretation of the visual world. Lund University Press: Lund.

    Tversky. A. (1977). Features of similarity. Psychological Review, 84(4), 327-352.

  • 2.
    Lenninger, Sara
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU). Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola.
    On children's semiotic freedom and the right to be heard2019Ingår i: Anticipation and Change / [ed] Morten Tønnessen, Stavanger, 2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding what others mean in a communicative situation, and to be self-understood, are key factors to be able to participate in and have influence on decisions that concern oneself. This is especially important in contexts where the person who is actually affected by a decision does not have the decisive power. Such a decision situation is many times relevant in relation to decisions concerning children, children's health, education and living conditions. According to Article 12 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) children have the right to be heard in connection with decisions concerning them. The article also expresses a reservation for this right due to age and maturity of the child.In this presentation, children’s right to be heard in connection with decisions concerning them is noted. It is claimed that knowledge of children's semiotics (cf. children’s meaning making and understanding of meanings) is required in order for such rights to be met in, for example, children's conversations with adults. A starting point for the discussions is that stories and narrative descriptions are semiotic recourses which meanings partly depend on the interpreter’s perception and habit of what “story telling” is in the first place. This condition applies to both those who tell and to those who listen to someone's story.Interestingly, even if a story is perceived by both a child and an adult in a conversational situation (and thus can be expected to be effective in a communication), such beliefs - from the point of view of the adult - can also be a barrier to the fact that the adult actually understands the conversation and the situation from the child's point of view (James & Prout 1997). The adult's habit and understanding of the narrative affect his or her interpretation in the conversation. Research on children's semiotic interactions has shown that even though children from early years participate in adult communication with pictures or stories, it takes many years of meaning making and communication for children to perceive these meanings in a manner similar to adults. Studies in children’s semiotic development suggest that a decisive factor for this gap in communication is related to differences in the use of sign relations (DeLoache 2004, Lenninger 2012, Piaget 1930, 1945, Vygotsky 2001).Moreover, in this presentation this difference is also discussed in terms of differences in semiotic freedom (cf. Hoffmeyer 2010). Semiotic freedom is about the ability to perceive and use different types of meanings in different contexts. Semiotic freedom follows the ability to navigate in, and affect, one’s social and communicative environment in a communicative situation.If we take the CRC seriously, the commitment lies with the authorities and itsrepresentatives to understand the child's perspective in meaning creation - not in children to understand the nuances of adult communication saturated with sign relations.

  • 3.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola. Lunds Universitet.
    Barns semiotiska frihet och om rätten att bli hörd2019Ingår i: Perspektiv på barnkonventionen / [ed] Lina Ponnert & Anna Sonander, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, s. 255-272Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 4.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Lunds Universitet.
    Culture in the layers of contemporary discourses and historical archives: a review of Anna Maria Larusso's Cultural Semiotics2017Ingår i: The public journal of semiotics, ISSN 1918-9907, Vol. 8, nr 1, s. 67-76Artikel, recension (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In Anna Maria Lorusso’s book Cultural semiotics: For a cultural perspective in semiotics (Lorusso, 2015) the reader is offered an initiated review of key representatives of 20th century structuralism in semiotics and its entries into poststructuralism, with focus on method of analysis. Related to the theoretical discussions on semiotics and culture, Lorusso offers a series of case studies in semiotic analysis of cultural texts. In this review article, I discuss and evaluate the four strands in cultural semiotics suggested by Lorusso. Further, I draw implications for deciding on the themes and objects of studies in a semiotic realm that focuses on text.

  • 5.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Lunds Universitet.
    Informing about states in the actual world by means of pictures: the role of contiguity in children’s perception of reference in iconic signs2017Ingår i: Technologies & Human Development: Symposium Session 15: Communication, Culture and Cognition Through the Material World / [ed] Carol D Lee & Colette Daiute, 2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In preschool, and at home, pictures and movie are often used to communicate with children about states in the lived world. They are all media with perceptual similarity in relation to their references. In this presentation it is suggested, however, that indexicality, in the sense of a contiguity connecting visual events so as to form meaningful sequences in time and space, is the important factor rather than variations of iconicity, for the younger children's understanding of visually communicated information as information about the actual world.

  • 6.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU). Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Lunds Universitet.
    Inverting cultures: the pictorial ceremonial of a suicide bomber and the“unhomeliness” of the photographic picture2017Ingår i: 13th IASS-AIS World Congress of Semiotics ” / 10thconference for The Nordic Association for Semiotic Studies (NASS), 2017Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    On the 14th of January in 2004, Reem Raiyshi killed herself and four Israeli soldiers in a terrorist attack at a border crossing between Israel and Gaza. Soon after the deed, pictures on Reem and her young son were sent to media agencies in Europe - and to circulate on the Internet. Although the picture of Reem is her picture, it is not unique but forms part of a subculture: the ceremonial of the suicide bombers seemed, at that time, to require the pictorial rendering of the perpetrator/victim in his or her declaration of the action before completing the act. Published on Internet, and circulating in mass media, the picture addresses not only the Ego culture of the perpetrator /victim, but also that of the attacked culture. To come into speaking terms with the external culture - or to alter between being "alien" or to be "one of ones own” for teh other – one must submit to a meaning already known by the other culture (Lotman 2009). To insert  “alien” elements, integrated with the meaning taken for granted, can be understood as a strategy in pictorial rhetoric in order to evade norm grounded predictability and invert cultural hierarchies.This case study adds to the complication of when the same picture confirming both to the status of Ego culture and as the “threat” of an intruding other-culture in the dynamics of regulating the perception of “us and them”.

  • 7.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Lunds Universitet.
    Om visuella yttranden med bild och andra meningsskapande ytor med likhet2017Manuskript (preprint) (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 8.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Lunds Universitet.
    Pictures: perceptions of realism in the service of communication2016Ingår i: Human lifeworlds: tThe cognitive semiotics of cultural evolution / [ed] David Dunér & Göran Sonesson, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2016, s. 97-112Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Pictures have not evolved as isolated phenomena in human culture, but occupy their

    place and contribute to changes in the complex and intricate processes we in this book

    designate as cultural evolution. In this chapter, pictures are discussed as semiotic

    resources from a perspective of human cultural evolution. The material picture (the

    picture-thing) is examined both as a perceptual object, and as a communicative

    resource. An assumption in this chapter is that the discrimination of the picture as a

    communicative resource had (and may still have) a vital, but also distinct, role in the

    human endeavour to explore sign relationships. Its distinctiveness does not consist in

    being the original or the prior semiotic resource in relation to other semiotic resources

    developed in human communication. Rather, its specific role derives from the

    combination of visual and communicative meanings employed in pictures, having

    recourse to the inherent qualities of “natural meaning”, but at the same time not being

    mere “natural experience”.

  • 9.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola. Lunds Universitet.
    Studies in children’s understanding of visual metaphor: a literature review from a cognitive semiotic perspective2018Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies in children’s understanding of visual metaphor. A literature review from a cognitive semiotic perspective

     

    Sara Lenninger, Kristianstad University

    The use of metaphor is pervasive in human communication (Stites & Özçaliskan, 2012). However, in the literature there are many ways to define metaphors (e.g. Black 1954; Kirby 1997; Gibbs 2008). In this paper, the metaphor will be considered to be a sign, and in addition, as an instance of iconic sign use. This means, firstly, that metaphor is studied as a meaning construction based in a sign relation. In this context, a sign relation consists of something perceived as an expression for something else, which also is conceived as its corresponding meaning or “content” (Sonesson 2008). As a consequence, a sign relation always involves an interpreting subject. Secondly, it means that iconic relations are crucial to the definition of what the metaphor is. Consequently, the concept of iconic signs has to be explored. This is why developmental studies on metaphor use (and understanding) link to cognitive theories on metaphor thinking (Billow, 1975; Lakoff & Johnson, 1980; Kogan et al., 1980) and to semiotic theories of meaning relations and sign use. Children’s understanding of pictorial metaphor is a field of research which has received less study than, notably, verbal metaphors. Nevertheless, the present paper will review studies on children’s development of metaphor use departing from different approaches on what metaphor is, and with particular attention to pictorial metaphors.

     Black, M. (1954). Metaphor. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, New Series.55 (1954-1955), 273-294.

    Billow, R. (1975). A Cognitive Developmental Study of Metaphor Comprehension. Developmental psychology, 11(4), 415-423.

    Gibbs, R. W. (red.) (2008). The Cambridge handbook of metaphor and thought. New York: Cambridge University Press

    Kirby, J. (1997). Aristotle on Metaphor. The American Journal of Philology, 118(4), 517-554.

    Kogan, N., Connor, K., Gross, A., & Fava, F. (1980). Understanding visual metaphor: Developmental and individual differences. Monographs of the society for research in child developmental serial, No. 183, Vol. 45 (1).

    Lakoff, G., & Johnson, M. (1980). Metaphors we live by. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Sonesson, G. (2008). Prolegomena to a general theory of iconicity. Considerations on language, gesture, and pictures. In K. Willems & L. De Cuypere (eds.) Naturalness and iconicity in language (pp.47-72). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

    Stites, L., j., & Özçaliskan, S. (2012). On Learning to Draw the Distinction between Physical and Metaphorical Motion: Is Metaphor an Early Emerging Cognitive and Linguistic Capacity? Journal of Child Language, 32, 291–318.

  • 10.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola. Lund University.
    The metaphor and the iconic attitude2019Ingår i: Cognitive Semiotics, ISSN 2235-2066, Vol. 12, nr 1Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses visual metaphors and aspects of similarity in relation to metaphors. The concept of metaphor should here be understood as a semiotic unit that is also a sign (cf. Ricœur, P. 1986. The Rule of Metaphor: Multi-Disciplinary Studies of the Creation of Meaning in Language. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.). This implies that not all semiotic units are signs, but also that not all signs are typical metaphors. The metaphor is a particular kind of sign because of its making use of the openness present in similarity relations. Metaphorical meaning making is related to a quality of vagueness in iconic sign relations. Furthermore, a notion of iconic attitude is proposed as a designation of subjective and intersubjective perspectives that might be taken on meanings founded on similarity. The iconic attitude mirrors the flexibility of thought and responds to the potentiality of vagueness in iconic sign relations; but, at the same time, the iconic attitude works as a stabilizing factor for meaning. Moreover, this attitude is crucial for the specification of the similarity relation in an actual sign experience with an iconic ground.

  • 11.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Lunds Universitet.
    The story and the experience: from a child’s perspective2016Ingår i: Researching children’s perspectives when norms and values are in conflict / [ed] Bodil Rasmusson & Kerstin Svensson, Socialhögskolan, Lunds Universitet , 2016, s. 25-29Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 12.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU). Lund University.
    When similarity qualifies as a sign: a study in picture understanding and semiotic development in young children2012Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The general goal of this thesis is to elucidate children’s early understandings of pictorial meanings, and how one can know anything about them. My central aim is to explore how picture comprehension develops during children’s first 3 years of life, through semiotic-theory-derived analyses of meaning relations. In so doing, I hope to contribute to the study of both semiotic theory’s psychological basis and the role of semiotic processes in cognitive development: specifically, in children’s experiences of pictorial meanings. In an experimental object retrieval test, including pictures, I show the importance of studying concrete instances of children’s experiences. Among its key results is that, for a group of children who are close to the threshold of being able to use the picture to solve the retrieval task, indexical cuing assists their understanding. One central claims is that the picture sign reflects a dual semiotic process: on the one hand, picture understanding relies on recognition of perceptual similarities; on the other, it draws on communicative processes that are intrinsic to all sign constructions. This duality is particularly interesting when it comes to looking at children’s development of picture understanding. Through similarity relations, children perceive accurate – but initially private and incomplete – understanding of pictures. At the same time though, children are alert to communicative meanings from the start.

  • 13.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Lunds universitet.
    When similarity qualifies as a sign: a study in picture understanding and semiotic development in young children2012Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The general goal of this thesis is to elucidate children’s early understandings of pictorial meanings, and how one can know anything about them. My central aim is to explore how picture comprehension develops during children’s first 3 years of life, through semiotic-theory-derived analyses of meaning relations. In so doing, I hope to contribute to the study of both semiotic theory’s psychological basis and the role of semiotic processes in cognitive development: specifically, in children’s experiences of pictorial meanings.

    In an experimental object retrieval test, including pictures, I show the importance of studying concrete instances of children’s experiences. Among its key results is that, for a group of children who are close to the threshold of being able to use the picture to solve the retrieval task, indexical cuing assists their understanding. 

    One central claims is that the picture sign reflects a dual semiotic process: on the one hand, picture understanding relies on recognition of perceptual similarities; on the other, it draws on communicative processes that are intrinsic to all sign constructions. This duality is particularly interesting when it comes to looking at children’s development of picture understanding. Through similarity relations, children perceive accurate – but initially private, and semiotically premature – understanding of pictures. At the same time though, children are alert to communicative meanings from the start. 

  • 14.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Pedagogik.
    When the other's responses are unpredictable; why does the baby still pay attention to the interaction?2015Ingår i: Semiotic (un)predictability / [ed] Kull, Kalevi, 2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In a study on young infants’ susceptibility to synchronic behaviours in dyadic interactions with others the children’s responses indicated tolerance in their interpretation of the situation. When 6 months old infants encountered a communicative other who did not match to the infants’ communicative behaviours the young infants nevertheless remained focused on the interaction. Moreover, the infants made efforts to intervene and take action in the communicative event.

    An increasing number of studies support the assumption that dyadic, dynamic and mutual interactions can be traced in communicative and affective relations between caregivers and infants from early infancy (Beebe et al 1985, Bråthen 2009, Stern 1985, Rochat 2009, Trevarthen & Murray 1985). According to Murray and Trevarthen (1985) already 6 -12 weeks old infants detect and respond to structural features in the caretaker’s behaviour in such a way that the caretaker, in its turn, is evoked to respond with a matching behaviour. When the infants are between 2-4 months old stable sequences characterize parent-infant face-to-face dyads (Levelli & Fogel 2002). Together, the studies indicate that at the age of 6 months children can be expected to have expectations on the behaviour of the other in communication games. Further, these expectations influence the child’s participation and understanding of the event.

    When studying semiotic development in young children not only developmental aspects of growing children should be examined but also the means by which children encounter meaning and communication. In my presentation, the dyadic interaction in our study will be analysed in respect of the dynamic potentialities that are framed in communication games with young infants.

  • 15.
    Lenninger, Sara M
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Sinha, Chris
    Hunan University.
    Sonesson, Göran
    Lunds universitet.
    Editorial introduction: semiotic and cognitive development in human evolution2015Ingår i: Cognitive development, ISSN 0885-2014, E-ISSN 1879-226X, Vol. 36, nr Oct/Dec, s. 127-129Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 16.
    Madsen, Elainie Alenkær
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Persson, Tomas
    Lund University.
    Sayehli, Susan
    Lund University.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Lund University.
    Sonesson, Göran
    Lund University.
    Chimpanzees show a developmental increase in susceptibility to contagious yawning: a test of the effect of ontogeny and emotional closeness on yawn contagion2013Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, nr 10Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Contagious yawning has been reported for humans, dogs and several non-human primate species, and associated with empathy in humans and other primates. Still, the function, development and underlying mechanisms of contagious yawning remain unclear. Humans and dogs show a developmental increase in susceptibility to yawn contagion, with children showing an increase around the age of four, when also empathy-related behaviours and accurate identification of others' emotions begin to clearly evince. Explicit tests of yawn contagion in non-human apes have only involved adult individuals and examined the existence of conspecific yawn contagion. Here we report the first study of heterospecific contagious yawning in primates, and the ontogeny of susceptibility thereto in chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes verus. We examined whether emotional closeness, defined as attachment history with the yawning model, affected the strength of contagion, and compared the contagiousness of yawning to nose-wiping. Thirty-three orphaned chimpanzees observed an unfamiliar and familiar human (their surrogate human mother) yawn, gape and nose-wipe. Yawning, but not nose-wiping, was contagious for juvenile chimpanzees, while infants were immune to contagion. Like humans and dogs, chimpanzees are subject to a developmental trend in susceptibility to contagious yawning, and respond to heterospecific yawn stimuli. Emotional closeness with the model did not affect contagion. The familiarity-biased social modulatory effect on yawn contagion previously found among some adult primates, seem to only emerge later in development, or be limited to interactions with conspecifics. The influence of the 'chameleon effect', targeted vs. generalised empathy, perspective-taking and visual attention on contagious yawning is discussed.

  • 17.
    Sonesson, Göran
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Lenninger, Sara M
    Lunds universitet.
    The psychological development of semiotic competence: from the window to the movie by way of the mirror2015Ingår i: Cognitive development, ISSN 0885-2014, E-ISSN 1879-226X, Vol. 36, nr Oct/Dec, s. 191-201Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychologists have been interested in the mirror image chiefly as a device permitting the subject to discover his/her self-representation, and semioticians have denied that the mirror image could be a kind of sign. In the present paper, our intention is to develop a framework for realising a detailed comparison between perceptual reality, as seen in a peephole, and mirror images, as well a streaming video and pre-recorded video. In the first section, we introduce the semiotic notion of sign, using precise criteria to assure that the mirror image, as used by adults, functions as a sign. In the second section, experimental studies comparing some constellations of perceptual reality, mirror images, and video strips are scrutinized, and we report briefly the results of a study which we ourselves set up to investigate the capacities of 2 year old children to understand an object choice task conveyed by means in those four kinds of media. The result suggests that continuity, which is the opposite of differentiation defining the sign, is still important for enabling the understanding of the task in children at this age.

  • 18.
    Zlatev, Jordan
    Lund University.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Lund University.
    Persson, Tomas
    Lund University.
    Sayehli, Susan
    Lund University.
    Sonesson, Göran
    Lund University.
    van de Weijer, Joost
    Lund University.
    Understanding communicative intentions and semiotic vehicles by children and chimpanzees2013Ingår i: Cognitive development, ISSN 0885-2014, E-ISSN 1879-226X, Vol. 28, nr 3, s. 312-329Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Developmental and comparative studies of the ability to understand communicative intentions using object-choice tasks raise questions concerning the semiotic properties of the communicative signals, and the roles of rearing histories, language and familiarity. We adapted a study by Tomasello, Call, and Gluckman (1997), in which a “helper” indicated the location of a hidden reward to children of three ages (18, 24, and 30 months) and to four chimpanzees, by means of one of four cues: Pointing, Marker, Picture and Replica. For the chimpanzees, we controlled for familiarity by using two helpers, one unfamiliar and one highly familiar. Even 18-months performed well on Pointing and Marker, while only the oldest group clearly succeeded with Picture and Replica. Performance did not correlate with scores for the Swedish Early Communicative Development Inventory (SECDI). While there were no positive results for the chimpanzees on the group level, and no effect of familiarity, two chimpanzees succeeded on Pointing and Marker. Results support proposals of a species difference in understanding communicative intentions, but also highlight the need to distinguish these from the complexity of semiotic vehicles and to consider both factors.

1 - 18 av 18
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf