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  • 1.
    Brunosson, Albina
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Praktisk-estetiska ämnen. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Brante, Göran
    University of Gothenburg.
    Sepp, Hanna
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Praktisk-estetiska ämnen. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University.
    To use a recipe – not a piece of cake: students with mild intellectual disabilities’ use of recipes in home economics2014Ingår i: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 38, nr 4, s. 412-418Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Recipes are not only part of today's cooking culture, they are also part of the Swedish syllabus of home economics. The aim of this study was to investigate what kinds of difficulties students with mild intellectual disabilities have using recipes during cooking lessons in home economics. We conducted an ethnographically inspired approach, with a total of 44 h of accompanying observations. Three compulsory schools for students with intellectual disabilities were enrolled in the study, and 37 students and three teachers were included. The socio-cultural theory of learning has been used as a theoretical framework. The findings reveal both that recipes are central artefacts during the cooking lessons and that the students have various difficulties using the recipes. The difficulties vary, and they concern both how the recipes are designed and the purport of the recipes. Difficulties in relation to the design included, for example, the separation of ingredients and instructions in the text and the large amount of information given in both the whole and the parts of the recipes. The difficulties in relation to the purport – that is, the meaning or sense of the recipe – were the ingredients, the kitchen utensils and the knowledge of how to perform a specific task. These difficulties can be considered special in relation to the use of the recipes. We suggest the concept of ‘recipe literacy’ to capture the complex knowledge of using recipes.

  • 2.
    Håkansson, Andreas
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Indoctrination or education?: intention of unqualified teachers to transfer consumption norms in home economics teaching2015Ingår i: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 39, nr 6, s. 682-691Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Almost two thirds of home economics teachers in Sweden are formally unqualified. Historically, home economics has focused more on fostering and prescribing the “right” choices whereas the modern (2011-) curriculum focuses on teaching consequences of choices and giving students tools for assessing alternatives. Restraining from prescribing norms requires a high degree of professionalism. The objective of this study was to empirically investigate the prevalence of intentions of formally unqualified teachers to prescribe consumption norms not supported by the curriculum. Furthermore, to investigate to what extent these intentions are correlated with years of experience as a teacher, personal preferences, or personal consumption. The intention to transfer norms were measured using the concept of intentional misalignment applied to a survey distributed to a sample of formally unqualified teachers attending complementary teacher education. A two part survey was used. The first part consisted of multiple choice questions asking the teachers how important they saw it to transfer different consumption norms to their students (e.g. to consume local or organic food). These responses were evaluated quantitatively (Spearman rank correlation, Wilcoxon rank sum test and Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance). The second part consisted of an open-ended question asking teachers to describe what they saw as the most important take-home message for students in home economics. The answers were compared to the national curriculum to identify intentions to transfer unsupported norms. The study indicates that more than a third of the formally unqualified home economics teachers in Sweden express the intention to prescribe specific types of consumption or to transfer consumption norms that are not supported by the curriculum. The prevalence is correlated to personal preferences and thus indicates difficulties with keeping a professional perspective. These teachers must be given collegial support and opportunities for continued education – to ensure high-quality home economics education for future generations.

  • 3.
    Håkansson, Andreas
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Praktisk-estetiska ämnen. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Intentions of formally qualified and unqualified teachers to transfer norms and values in home economics teaching2016Ingår i: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 40, nr 3, s. 268-275Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically, home economics in general, and the consumer education sections in particular, have been criticized for transferring norms and values of conservative elites to the masses. This is in stark contrast to contemporary theoretical views of a modern home economics aimed at educating emancipated and critical citizens, and also to modern curricula that emphasize the consequences of consumption rather than dogma. A previous study has indicated that formally unqualified teachers see the transfer of consumption norms and values without support in the curriculum as an important objective of home economics teaching, a practice that is questionable from a democratic perspective. This follow-up study investigates to what extent formally qualified home economics teachers show intentions to transfer consumption norms and values without support in the curriculum to students, by using content analysis of 201 survey responses from Swedish qualified home economics teachers and comparing to data from a previously published study on formally unqualified teachers. It is concluded that the qualified teachers demonstrate intentions to transfer unsupported norms and values, though, to a lower degree than unqualified teachers. The results are interpreted by adopting a values education perspective on home economics. This indicates that the observed emphasis on norms and values could be seen partly as a lack of a proficient professional metalanguage among the teachers, and partly as a consequence of the focus on developing a pre-defined moral of consumption in home economics literature. The implications on how to develop home economics teacher education to reduce norm and value transfer intentions are discussed based on the empirical findings and the theoretical framework. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Håkansson, Andreas
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Praktisk-estetiska ämnen. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    What is overconsumption?: a step towards a common understanding2014Ingår i: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 38, nr 6, s. 692-700Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Overconsumption is a widely used term in science, media and among concerned consumers. What do we mean by this term? This study is based on the assumption that both the public debate on consumption and consumer research could benefit from better understanding how this term is used and from clarifying the definition. The primary aim of this study was to describe how the term ‘overconsumption’ is being used in the contemporary scientific debate in fields related to consumer studies. This was done by studying the use of the term in scientific journal papers between 2010 and 2012 using qualitative content analysis. It is concluded that overconsumption is often described as consumption of hedonic goods by individuals with undesirable personality traits, low moral or belonging to minority groups. Furthermore, overconsumption is described as having detrimental effects both on the individual consumer, the society and the environment; however, direct individual effects are more frequently mentioned in the studies. The term is seldom defined explicitly. This might lead to confusion and misunderstanding between research fields and between different stakeholders. A structured framework for generating clear and useful definitions is suggested in this study, based on the reviewed papers and a theoretical framework from moral philosophy.

  • 5.
    Lindén, Anna-Lisa
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Nyberg, Maria
    Lund University.
    The workplace lunch room: an arena for multi-cultural eating2009Ingår i: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 33, s. 42-48Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Many countries in Europe have experienced growing migration since World War II. It is estimated that more than one in five Swedes living today has roots in other countries and cultures. Segregation in terms of ethnic origin in housing areas makes it easier to maintain the language and cultural traditions of the home country when it comes to cooking and eating. In extremely segregated housing areas, there may even be no interface between foreign cultural traditions and Swedish traditions in food consumption. Almost every inhabitant in the age range 20–65 years spends a number of years in workplaces outside the home. Workplaces are generally melting pots for employees of all ages and ethnic groups. In this study, a bus company lunch room served as a field for studying preferences in food, meals structure and eating patterns during lunch breaks. The city centre lunch room was visited by every driver at least once during their working day for coffee/tea, lunch or a rest. The lunch room served as an arena for discussions and exposure to new foods customs relating to meals and eating. It thus constituted a place for cultural exchange about food preferences and for forming opinions about individuals and nationalities, including Swedes. The methods for gathering empirical material for the analysis were participant observations and semi-structured interviews. Food consumption can be recognized as a marker of class and status in the same way as consumption of leisure activities and clothing. Some new criteria in identifying members of we-groups in relation to others can be added to the classical criteria. When language fails in communication, visible signs become more important. A workplace lunch room is a clear arena for attitude formation. Attitudes may be conservative or stereotyped but sometimes evoke the curiosity to eat something different. In a multicultural arena such as a workplace lunch room, the knowledge available about food, meals and preferences is sometimes far from the real truth, especially when visible impressions are not followed by verbal communication, which can sometimes lead to incomplete and narrow-minded conclusions.

  • 6.
    Sepp, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Domestic Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Abrahamsson, Lillemor
    Department of Domestic Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Department of Domestic Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Pre-school staff’s attitudes toward foods in relation to the pedagogic meal2006Ingår i: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 30, nr 2, s. 224-232Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study, with the pedagogic meal in focus, was to identify pre-school staff members' attitudes to the role of food and meals as part of daily activities at pre-school. Interviews were carried out at 12 pre-schools and a total of 34 pre-school staff participated. The staff revealed strong opinions as well as ambivalence towards how food and meals should best be integrated into their daily work and pedagogic activities. The pre-school staffs' lack of or insufficient education and knowledge regarding food and nutrition resulted in an ambivalent and uncertain situation with respect to how they should see themselves as teachers in the meal situation. Nevertheless, most of the staff had a clear perception of what it meant to practice a pedagogic meal. It meant helping and encouraging the children to help themselves and serving as an adult model for the children at table, though this pedagogic activity was uncommon. While the staff were satisfied with the pre-schools' role of catering for the children, they expressed concern about or even mistrust towards the children's parents. Despite, or perhaps due to, their inadequate knowledge about food and nutrition and the lack of specific aims for the pedagogic meal, they assumed that the public sector was a better educational institution regarding foods and a better guarantor for children's food habits and dietary intake. As the teachers' identities have changed over the past years they have not yet found a solid ground for determining how food and meals could be integrated into their everyday work as pre-school teachers and childminders.

  • 7.
    Wendin, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Praktisk-estetiska ämnen. SP Technical Research Institute, Sweden & University of Copenhagen, Dept of Food Science, Denmark.
    Åström, Annika
    SP Technical Research Institute, Sweden.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Exploring differences between central located test and home use test in a living lab context2015Ingår i: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 39, nr 3, s. 230-238Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of Living Labs (LLs) has evolved to support the creation of experience-based development of innovations in real-life, user-driven and open environments. Two types of consumer product tests used generally are central location tests (CLT) and home use tests (HUT) where the acceptability or liking of a product or group of products is determined together with the view of whether one product is preferred over other products. This article explores the similarities and differences between CLT and HUT test results in a LL context. In both settings, the acceptance of five flavoured chocolate bars was evaluated for appearance, odour, taste/flavour, texture and overall liking. Apart from the mean values of liking in the two tests, data were analysed to identify consumer segments. Qualitative data were also collected by asking for consumer comments on the tested samples. The results show that independent of test method the bars were evaluated equally and all accepted by the consumers. A clear difference between CLT and HUT testing was that CLT consumers significantly differed from the HUT consumers, giving the test samples lower scores. For example, the mean values of the overall acceptance scores given by HUT consumers varied between 6.0 and 6.6, while for CLT consumers the corresponding values varied from 5.4 to 5.9. Another difference was the number of comments from consumers. CLT consumers richly commented on the products in a verbose way, while HUT consumers used the opportunity to comment very sparingly. Considering the cluster analysis as yet another difference between the testing methods, clusters from the CLT were more distinct and the number was higher with five clusters in CLT and four in HUT. Clusters where consumers liked all the products in both test settings were twice as many for HUT than in CLT. Applying the LL approach, there is a need for methods and approaches that capture a rich picture of consumers during test performance without being intrusive or obstructive of activities and context. The approach offers the opportunity for companies to have consumers not only test products but also offer input that can stimulate new innovations and give consumers more power and influence.

  • 8.
    Wesslén, Annika
    et al.
    Department of Domestic Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Sepp, Hanna
    Department of Domestic Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Department of Domestic Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Swedish preschool children's experience of food2002Ingår i: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 26, nr 4, s. 264-271Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Focus group interviews were carried out at 12 preschools. The aim was to investigate children's perceptions and experiences of food, and the possibility of using focus group techniques with children aged 3–5 years. A total of 103 children participated. The children associated food and eating with rules and norms. Most children described these rules and norms as well as what they were and were not allowed to do. They knew very well the difference between acceptable and non-acceptable mealtime behaviour, and were especially aware of what they were not allowed to do. When children were asked to rate foods they 'disliked', they spoke instead about their favourite foods. They did not categorize food as good or bad, as adults often do, but as 'food' and 'non-food', for example, sweets were not food. The method used in this study, the focus group interview, was judged to be a useful tool for exploring how children think about and jointly reflect upon food.

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