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  • 1.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för Hälsa och Samhälle.
    Europeiska ljudlandskap – tur och retur: en betraktelse inifrån av ett soundscape-projekt2010Inngår i: Nutida musik, ISSN 1652-6082, nr 1, 45-47 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle.
    Interaktiv musikkomposition2012Doktoravhandling, monografi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation, titled Interactive Music Composition, is a practice based Ph.D. thesis in the field of Musicology. The purpose is to explore if and how one can compose computer based interactive music, that is musically satisfying for an interacting audience, consisting of both laymen and skilled musicians. The text describes the design and reflection in two interactive music installations: Do-Be-DJ, open-air installation in a public park, and, Mufi, with modular and moveable interface. Based on methods and per­spectives in Musicology and Interaction Design, a composition model for interactive music is developed. The model investigates the experience di­mensions listen, explore, compose and collaborate. It also investigates the design dimensions of interaction, narrative structure, composition rule and sound node. The conceptual approach is to apply improvisation and composition methods from jazz, pop and groove based music on interactive music. It also uses the concepts of openess in musical structures and interpretation, musical mediation of actions and meaning and everyday use of music, when composing interactive music. The dissertation contributes to an understanding of how to create composition techniques for interactive music, such as: Direct, varied and shifting response. It reflects on the change in meaning of the musicological terms composition, improvisation, musical work, listener, musician and audience. And on the interaction design terms interaction, gameplay, system and user. The term co-creator is used to describe an actively, interacting and collaborating person, to complement traditional terms like audience, performer and user.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Malmö högskola.
    "Shoot ’em up -musik": om musikaliska strukturer för interaktivt berättande i tevespelet Rez2003Inngår i: NM/T Nutida Musik/Tritonus, ISSN 0029-6597, nr 2, 26-30 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det musikdramatiska berättandet har idag lierat sig med nya medier och teknologier. Resultatet av detta är att gränsen mellan lyssnaren och den aktive kompositören håller på att luckras upp. I musiken till datorspelen finner vi ett musikdramatiskt berättande som genom interaktiviteten frångår det traditionella berättandets linjära narratologi. Att komponera musik som både är intressant och samtidigt flexibelt rättar sig efter en publik som fysiskt medverkar till att skapa musiken är kanske vår tids största utmaning för nu verksamma musiker, tonsättare och dramatiker.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Designing empowering vocal and tangible interaction: 2013Inngår i: The International conference on new interfaces for musical expression / [ed] Kyogu Lee, Kaejeon, Korea: Seoul National University , 2013, 406-412 s.Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Our voice and body are important parts of our self-experience, and our communication and relational possibilities. They gradually become more important for Interaction Design due to increased development of tangible interaction and mobile communication. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our ongoing research project RHYME. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible media. We build on the use of voice in Music Therapy and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible interactive media that through use reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross-media techniques to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate voice-body connections, positive emotions and structures for actions.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Musical interaction for health improvement2014Inngår i: Oxford handbook of interactive audio / [ed] Karen Collins, Bill Kapralos, Holly Tessler, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2014, 247-262 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past decade, tangible sensor technologies have matured and become less expensive and easier to use, leading to an explosion of innovative musical designs within video games, smartphone applications, and interactive art installations. Interactive audio has become an important design quality in commercially successful games like Guitar Hero , and a range of mobile phone applications motivating people to interact, play, dance, and collaborate with music. Parallel to the game, phone, and art scenes, an area of music and health research has grown, showing the positive results of using music to promote health and wellbeing in everyday situations and for a broad range of people, from children and elderly to people with psychological and physiological disabilities. Both quantitative medical and ecological humanistic research show that interaction with music can improve health, through music’s ability to evoke feelings, motivate people to interact, master, and cope with difficult situations, create social relations and experience shared meaning. Only recently, however, the music and health field has started to take interest in interactive audio, based on computer-mediated technologies’ potential for health improvement. Here, we show the potential of using interactive audio in what we call interactive musicking in the computer-based interactive environment Wave. Interactive musicking is based on musicologist Christopher Small’s concept “musicking”, meaning any form of relation-building that occurs between people, and people and things, related to activities that include music. For instance, musicking includes dancing, listening, and playing with music (in professional contexts and in amateur, everyday contexts). We have adapted the concept of "musicking" on the design of computer-based musical devices. The context for this chapter is the research project RHYME. RHYME is a multidisciplinary collaboration between the Centre for Music and Health at the Norwegian Academy of Music, the Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO), and Informatics at the University of Oslo. Our target group is families with children with severe disabilities. Our goal is to improve health and wellbeing in the families through everyday musicking activities in interactive environments. Our research approach is to use knowledge from music and health research, musical composition and improvisation, musical action research, musicology, music sociology, and soundscape studies, when designing the tangible interactive environments. Our focus here is interaction design and composition strategies, following research-by-design methodology, creating interactive musicking environments. We describe the research and design of the interactive musicking environment Wave, based on video documentation, during a sequence of actions. Our findings suggest some interactive audio design strategies to improve health. We base the design strategies on musical actions performed while playing an instrument, such as impulsive or iterative hitting, or sustainable stroking of an instrument. Musical actions like these can also be used for musicking in everyday contexts, creating direct sound responses to evoke feelings that create expectations and confirm interactions. In opposition to a more control-oriented, instrument and interface perspective, we argue that musical variation and narrative models can be used to design interactive audio, where the audio is seen as an actor taking many different roles, as instrument, co-musician, toy, etc. In this way, the audio and the interactive musicking environments will change over time, answering with direct response, as well as nose-thumbing and changing response, motivating creation, play, and social interaction. Musical variation can also be used to design musical backgrounds and soundscapes that can be used for creating layers of ambience. These models create a safe environment and contribute to shared meaning.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Institute of Design, The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    Institute of Design, The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Vocal and tangible interaction crossing borders2013Inngår i: Include Asia 2013 Proceedings: global challenges and local solutions in inclusive design, Conference on inclusive design / [ed] Jeremy Myerson, London: Helen Hamlyn Centre of Design, The Royal College of Art in London, The Hong Kong Design Centre , 2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Our voice and body are important parts of our self-expression and self-experience for all of us. They are also essential for our way to communicate and build relations cross borders such as abilities, ages, locations and backgrounds. Voice, body and tangibility gradually become more important for ICT, due to increased development of tangible interaction and mobile communication. The voice and tangible interaction therefore also become more important for the Universal Design field. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our ongoing research project RHYME. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible and sensorial media. We build on use of voice in Music Therapy, knowledge from multi-sensory stimulation and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible interactive media that are sensorially stimulating. Interactive media that through use reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for all the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross-media techniques, to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate voice-body connections, positive emotions and structures for actions.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Vocal and tangible interaction in RHYME2014Inngår i: Music, Health, Technology and Design / [ed] Stensæth, Karette, Oslo: Norwegian Academy of Music , 2014, 21-38 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Our voice and body are important parts of our self-expression and self-experience for all of us. They are also essential for our way to communicate and build relations cross borders such as abilities, ages, locations and backgrounds. Voice, body and tangibility gradually become more important for Information and Communication Technology (ICT), due to increased development of tangible interaction and mobile communication. The voice and tangible interaction therefore also become more important for the fields of Assistive Technology, Health Technology and Universal Design. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our on-going research project RHYME. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible and sensorial media. We build on use of voice in Music Therapy, knowledge from multi-sensory stimulation and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible interactive media that are sensorially stimulating. Interactive media that through use, can reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for all the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross-media techniques, to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate voice-body connections, positive emotions and structures for actions.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Vocal and tangible technology for music and health2013Inngår i: Book of abstracts: setting the tone: cultures of relating and reflecting in music therapy / [ed] Gro Trondalen, Oslo: The Norwegian Academy of Music , 2013, 24-24 s.Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Our voice and body are important parts of our self-expression and self-experience. They are also essential for our way to communicate and build relations cross borders like abilities, ages, locations, backgrounds and cultures. Voice and tangibility gradually become more important when developing new music technology for the Music Therapy and the Music and Health fields, due to new technology possibilities that have recently arisen. For example smartphones, computer games and networked, social media services like Skype. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our ongoing research project. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with severe disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible sensorial media. We build on use of voice in Music Therapy and studies by Lisa Sokolov, Diane Austin, Kenneth Bruscia and Joanne Loewy. Further we build on knowledge from Multi-sensory stimulation and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible, sensorially stimulating interactive media, that through use reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for all the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross- media techniques, to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate body- voice connections, positive emotions and structures for actions. The reflections in this paper build on action research methods, video observations and research-by-design methods. We reflect on observations of families and close others with children with severe disabilities, interacting in three vocal and tangible installations.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för Hälsa och Samhälle.
    Cappellen, Birgitta
    The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Same but different: composing for interactivity2008Inngår i: Audio Mostly Conference: A Conference on Interaction with Sound, October 22-23 2011, Luleå University, Interactive Institute, Sonic, 2008, 80-85 s.Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on experiences from practical design work, we try to show, what we believe, are the similarities and differences, between composing music for interactive media compared to linear music. In our view, much is the same, built on traditions that have been around for centuries within music and composition. The fact that the composer writes programming code is an essential difference. Instead of writing one linear work, he creates infinite numbers of potential musics that reveal themselves as answers to user interactions in many situations. Therefore, we have to broaden our perspectives. We have to put forward factors that earlier was implicit in the musical and music making situations, no matter if it was the concert hall, the church, or the club. When composing interactive music we have to consider the genre, the potential roles the listener might take, and the user experience in different situations.

  • 10.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Co-created staging: situating installations2011Inngår i: Interactive Media Arts Conference, IMAC2011, Re-new digital arts festival / [ed] Ass. Prof. Morten Søndergaard, ArT / Aalborg University, Copenhagen, 2011Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Staging is the creative act of showing something to an audience.When staging, the artist choose and create the context, situationand structure of the presented object, play or installation. The chosen context and situation provide background for the audience interpretations. Meaning is co-created between the artist and audience, based on the cultural and individual understanding of the context and situation. The term installation is open, ambiguous and undefined. One does not completely know what to expect and where to find an installation. It is open towards many interpretations. In this paper we present how we worked with staging of two interactive installations in different exhibition situations, to provoke and motivate different interpretations, expectations and interactions. We argue for staging as a communicative strategy to attract and motivate diverse audiences and user groups to collaborate and co-create through interpretation and interaction. Further we argue that installations have to be open to many possible structures, interpretations, interaction forms and roles the user can take, and shift betweendynamically. When the user dynamically restructure, shift rolesand thereby re-situate the installation, the user is a co-creator in the staging act. We call this dynamic staging.

  • 11.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Designing four generations of 'Musicking Tangibles'2014Inngår i: Music, Health, Technology and Design / [ed] Stensæth, Karette, Oslo: Norwegian Academy of Music , 2014, 1-20 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    n this article we present a novel approach for the understanding and the design of interactive health improving music technology, what we call Musicking Tangibles. The Musicking Tangibles approach represents an alternative approach to the traditional instrument, interface and switch-oriented music technology perspective. Our approach combines a humanistic, resource and empowerment oriented health approach with an aesthetic and culture based design approach towards music technology. We present four empowering and health improving qualities for the Musicking Tangibles. These qualities emphasize to: 1) Continually evoke interest and positive emotions relevant to diverse users’ interpretation of the tangibles and the situation; 2) Dynamically offer the users many roles to take, many musicking actions to make and many ways to express themselves; 3) Offer the users aesthetically consistent responses and build relevant cross-media expectations and challenges over time and space, consistent with their character; 4) Offer the users many relations to make: to people, things, experiences, events and places. Further we present and argue for some design solutions of the Musicking Tangibles ORFI, WAVE, REFLECT, and the POLLY World from the RHYME-project. In developing POLLY we have tried to put together as many design qualities as possible, to exemplify our view and current understanding.

  • 12.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle.
    Expanding the role of the instrument2011Inngår i: Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, 30 May - 1 June 2011, Oslo, Norway / [ed] Alexander Refsum Jensenius, Rolf Inge Godøy, Oslo University, Oslo, 2011, 511-514 s.Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional role of the musical instrument is to be the working tool of the professional musician. On the instrument the musician performs music for the audience to listen to. In this paper we present an interactive installation, where we expand the role of the instrument to motivate musicking and co-creation between diverse users. We have made an open installation, where users can perform a variety of actions in several situations. By using the abilities of the computer, we have made an installation which can be interpreted to have many roles. It can both be an instrument, a co-musician, a communication partner, a toy, a meeting place and an ambient musical landscape. The users can dynamically shift between roles, based on their abilities, knowledge and motivation.

     

  • 13.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Malmö högskola.
    From designing objects to designing fields: from control to freedom2003Inngår i: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 14, nr 2, 74-90 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we want to explore Field as a concept and as a metaphor for understanding interactive systems. By interactive systems we mean both systems and artworks, where the user by interacting changes the course of events. We intend to show why we need new terms and why we consider Field to be a fruitful concept and term. Further we will show how the Field concept changes both our understanding of what we do as designers and composers and how we acknowledge our audience. We will exemplify the design consequences of the Field concept by going through some design considerations we made when designing the audio tactile installation Mufi.

  • 14.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Institute of Design, The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    The empowering potential of re-staging2012Inngår i: Leonardo Electronic Almanac, ISSN 1071-4391, E-ISSN 1071-4391, ISSN 1071-4391, Vol. 18, nr 3, 132-140 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present and discuss the empowering potential of restaging interactive art installations. We build on an approach, where wedivide the staging process into four levels of staging (potential, strategic,tactical, dynamic), and in Umberto Eco’s sense open, to four categories ofchoices (genre, temporal, spatial, actorial) to perform on each staging level. We present and discuss how we staged one of our interactive installations at a museum of modern art and a rehabilitation centre for people with severe disabilities. We discuss our staging experience in relation to empowering qualities like; possibilities for self-expression, vitalization, ability to act, co-create, participation and mutual relation building. Our experience was that re-staging art at a radically different place became a provocation that re-vitalized us as creative individuals.

  • 15.
    Linge, Anna
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Pedagogik.
    The meaning of music2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 16.
    Linge, Anna
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Pedagogik.
    Danielsson, Annika
    Örebro universitet.
    Westvall, Maria
    Örebro universitet.
    Musikens pedagogik eller musikpedagogik?2006Inngår i: Musikens pedagogik eller musikpedagogik?: teoretiska perspektiv på musikalisk mening, socialisation och musiksyn / [ed] Danielsson, Annika, Linge, Anna, Westvall, Maria, Örebro: Avdelningen för musikpedagogik och konstnärligt utvecklingsarbete, Musikhögskolan vid Örebro universitet , 2006Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 17.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö.
    Music, young people and physical impairment2012Inngår i: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 22, nr Suppl. 2, 177- s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 18.
    Ottosson, Ingemar
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Institutionen för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap.
    Från cembalo till synthesizer: fyrahundra år av klassisk musik i Kina2006Inngår i: Kina-rapport, ISSN 0345-5807, nr 3Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 19.
    Persson, Filip
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle.
    Augustsson, Tobias
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle.
    Effect tapper: interactive use of effects for musicians2012Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe a prototype development for an interactive effect for musicians. This project was made with members of the horn section in the band Damn! They are also performing together with the Swedish hip-hop act Timbuktu. The instrument we focused on was the trombone. The trombone is played without a strap and is held and played with both hands. You use it by blowing into its mouthpiece and regulating its slide brace with one of your hands. The trombone itself is a rather long instrument and since it is not attached to your body by straps, this attribute can be an advantage when designing an interactive effect. It makes the instrument interesting for using sensors to read its position and movement (Y-axis, X-axis, and Z-axis). One sensor that we in this paper argue for is the accelerometer which proved to fit perfect for this task. The result ended up as a prototype for what we call Effect Tapper – software that with the help of an accelerometer and a tap tempo pedal let you use an interactive and controllable delay effect. In the tests with trombonist Jens Lindgård of the band Damn! we show that the prototype improved interaction, his possibility to control the effect and become more creative when playing.

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