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  • 1.
    Halldén, Christer
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Mårtensson, A.
    Department of Paediatrics and Malmö Centre for Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö.
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Säll, T.
    Department of Biology, Lund University.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Lidén, Annika C.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Ljung, R.
    Department of Paediatrics and Malmö Centre for Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö.
    Origin of Swedish hemophilia B mutations2013Inngår i: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 1538-7933, E-ISSN 1538-7836, Vol. 11, nr 11, 2001-2008 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: More than 1100 mutations that cause hemophilia B (HB) have been identified. At the same time, specific F9 mutations are present at high frequencies in certain populations, which raise questions about the origin of HB mutations.

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the mutation spectrum of all HB families in Sweden and investigate if mutations appearing in several families are due to independent recurrent mutations (RMs) or to a common mutation event (i.e. are identical by descent (IBD)).

    PATIENTS/METHODS: The registered Swedish HB population consists of patients from 86 families. Mutations were identified by resequencing and identical haplotypes were defined using 74 markers and a control population of 285 individuals. The ages of IBD mutations were estimated using ESTIAGE.

    RESULTS: Out of 77 presumably unrelated patients with substitution mutations, 47 patients (61%) had mutations in common with other patients. Haplotyping of the 47 patients showed that 24 patients had IBD mutations (51%) with estimated ages of between two and 23 generations. A majority of these patients had mild disease. Eight of the 15 mutations observed in more than one family were C>T transitions in CpG sites and all eight were RMs.

    CONCLUSIONS: The association of IBD mutations with a mild phenotype is similar to what has been previously observed in hemophilia A. Noteworthy features of the mutations that are common to more than one family are the equal proportions of patients with RM and IBD mutations and the correlation between the occurrence of RMs and C>T transitions at CpG sites.

  • 2.
    Halldén, Christer
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Säll, Torbjorn
    Department of Biology, Lund University.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Lidén, Annika C.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Ljung, R.
    Department of Pediatrics and Malmö Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Lund University.
    Origin of Swedish hemophilia A mutations2012Inngår i: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 1538-7933, E-ISSN 1538-7836, Vol. 10, nr 12, 2503-2511 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

     Background: Hemophilia A (HA) has a high level of variation within the disease class, with more than 1000 mutations being listed in the HAMSTeRS database. At the same time a number of F8 mutations are present in specific populations at high frequencies. Objectives: The simultaneous presence of large numbers of rare mutations and a small number of high-frequency mutations raises questions about the origins of HA mutations. The present study was aimed at describing the origins of HA mutations in the complete Swedish population. The primary issue was to determine what proportion of identical mutations are identical by descent (IBD) and what proportion are attributable to recurrent mutation events. The age of IBD mutations was also determined. Patients/Methods: In Sweden, the care of HA is centralized, and the Swedish HA population consists of ∼ 750 patients from > 300 families (35% severe, 15% moderate, and 50% mild). Identical haplotypes were defined by single-nucleotide polymorphism and microsatellite haplotyping, and the ages of the mutations were estimated with estiage. Results: Among 212 presumably unrelated patients with substitution mutations, 97 (46%) had mutations in common with other patients. Haplotyping of the 97 patients showed that 47 had IBD mutations (22%) with estimated ages of between two and 35 generations. The frequency of mild disease increased with an increasing number of patients sharing the mutations. Conclusions: A majority of the IBD mutations are mild and have age estimates of a few hundred years, but some could date back to the Middle Ages.

  • 3.
    Henmyr, Viktor
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin. Lund University.
    Carlberg, Daniel
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Manderstedt, Eric
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Plattformen för molekylär analys. Lund University.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Säll, T.
    Lund University.
    Cardell, L. O.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Halldén, Christer
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Genetic variation of the toll-like receptors in a Swedish allergic rhinitis case population2017Inngår i: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 18, nr 1, 18Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Variation in the 10 toll-like receptor (TLR) genes has been significantly associated with allergic rhinitis (AR) in several candidate gene studies and three large genome-wide association studies. These have all investigated common variants, but no investigations for rare variants (MAF ≤ 1%) have been made in AR. The present study aims to describe the genetic variation of the promoter and coding sequences of the 10 TLR genes in 288 AR patients.

    METHODS: Sanger sequencing and Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing was used to identify polymorphisms in a Swedish AR population and these were subsequently compared and evaluated using 1000Genomes and Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) data.

    RESULTS: The overall level of genetic variation was clearly different among the 10 TLR genes. The TLR10-TLR1-TLR6 locus was the most variable, while the TLR7-TLR8 locus was consistently showing a much lower level of variation. The AR patients had a total of 37 promoter polymorphisms with 14 rare (MAF ≤ 1%) and 14 AR-specific polymorphisms. These numbers were highly similar when comparing the AR and the European part of the 1000Genomes populations, with the exception of TLR10 where a significant (P = 0.00009) accumulation of polymorphisms were identified. The coding sequences had a total of 119 polymorphisms, 68 were rare and 43 were not present in the European part of the 1000Genomes population. Comparing the numbers of rare and AR-specific SNPs in the patients with the European part of the 1000Genomes population it was seen that the numbers were quite similar both for individual genes and for the sum of all 10 genes. However, TLR1, TLR5, TLR7 and TLR9 showed a significant excess of rare variants in the AR population when compared to the non-Finnish European part of ExAC. In particular the TLR1 S324* nonsense mutation was clearly overrepresented in the AR population.

    CONCLUSIONS: Most TLR genes showed a similar level of variation between AR patients and public databases, but a significant excess of rare variants in AR patients were detected in TLR1, TLR5, TLR7, TLR9 and TLR10. This further emphasizes the frequently reproduced TLR10-TLR1-TLR6 locus as being involved in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis.

  • 4.
    Henmyr, Viktor
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Halldén, Christer
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Säll, Torbjörn
    Lund University.
    Carlberg, Daniel
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Bachert, Claus
    Belgien.
    Cardell, Lars-Olaf
    Karolinska institutet.
    Chronic rhinosinusitis patients show accumulation of genetic variants in PARS22016Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, nr 6, e0158202Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic studies of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) have identified a total of 53 CRS-associated SNPs that were subsequently evaluated for their reproducibility in a recent study. The rs2873551 SNP in linkage disequilibrium with PARS2 showed the strongest association signal. The present study aims to comprehensively screen for rare variants in PARS2 and evaluate for accumulation of such variants in CRS-patients. Sanger sequencing and long-range PCR were used to screen for rare variants in the putative promoter region and coding sequence of 310 CRS-patients and a total of 21 variants were detected. The mutation spectrum was then compared with data from European populations of the 1000Genomes project (EUR) and the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC). The CRS population showed a significant surplus of low-frequency variants compared with ExAC data. Haplotype analysis of the region showed a significant excess of rare haplotypes in the CRS population compared to the EUR population. Two missense mutations were also genotyped in the 310 CRS patients and 372 CRS-negative controls, but no associations with the disease were found. This is the first re-sequencing study in CRS research and also the first study to show an association of rare variants with the disease.

  • 5.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Dahlen, Anna
    Section of Clinical Genetics, Lund University Hospital.
    Hillarp, Andreas
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry, Lund University.
    Zöller, Bengt
    Center for Primary Health Care Research, Malmö University Hospital.
    Dahlbäck, Björn
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry, Lund University.
    Halldén, Christer
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Small and large PROS1 deletions but no other types of rearrangements detected in patients with protein S deficiency2012Inngår i: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 108, nr 1, 94-100 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein S deficiency is a dominantly inherited disorder that results from mutations in the PROS1 gene. Previous sequencing of the gene failed to detect mutations in eight out of 18 investigated Swedish families, whereas segregation analyses detected large deletions in three out of the eight families. The present study investigates more thoroughly for the presence of deletions but also for other types of rearrangements. FISH analysis confirmed the existence of the three previously identified large deletions, but failed to identify any other type of rearrangement among the eight analysed families. MLPA analysis of the PROS1 gene revealed two smaller deletions covering two and four exons, respectively. Thus, deletions could be found in five out of eight families where no point mutations could be found despite sequencing of the gene. Twelve additional, not previously analysed, families were subsequently analysed using MLPA. The analysis identified two smaller deletions (3 and 4 exons). Including all PS-deficient families, i.e. also the 10 families where sequencing found a causative point mutation, deletions were identified in seven out of 30 PS-deficient families. A strategy of sequencing followed by MLPA analysis in mutation-negative families identified the causative mutation in 15 out of 18 of Swedish PS-deficient families. Most deletions were different as determined by their sizes, locations and flanking haplotypes. FISH (8 families) and MLPA analysis (20 families) failed to identify other types of rearrangements.

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