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  • 1.
    Halldén, Christer
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Knobe, K. E.
    Departments of Pediatrics and Malmö Centre for Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Sjörin, E.
    Departments of Pediatrics and Malmö Centre for Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Ljung, R.
    Departments of Pediatrics and Malmö Centre for Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Investigation of disease-associated factors in haemophilia A patients without detectable mutations2012Inngår i: Haemophilia, ISSN 1351-8216, E-ISSN 1365-2516, Vol. 18, nr 3, e132-e137 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate disease causing mechanism in haemophilia A patients without detectable mutation. Screening for F8 mutations in 307 haemophilia A patients using: re-sequencing and inversion PCR, reverse transcription (RT-PCR) of mRNA, MLPA analysis, haplotyping using SNP and microsatellite markers. No F8 mutations were detected in 9 of the 307 patients (2.9%) using re-sequencing and inversion PCR. MLPA analysis detected duplication in exon 6 in one patient and RT-PCR showed no products for different regions of mRNA in four other patients, indicating failed transcription. No obvious associations were observed between the phenotypes of the nine patients, their F8 haplotypes and the putative mutations detected. The mutation-positive patients carrying the same haplotypes as the mutation-negative patients show a multitude of different mutations, emphasizing the lack of associations at the haplotype level. VWF mutation screening and factor V measurements ruled out type 2N VWD and combined factor V and VIII deficiency respectively. To further investigate a possible role for FVIII interacting factors the haplotypes/diplotypes of F2, F9, F10 and VWF were compared. The nine patients had no specific haplotype/diplotype combination in common that can explain disease. Duplications and faulty transcription contribute to the mutational spectrum of haemophilia A patients where conventional mutation screening fail to identify mutations.

  • 2.
    Halldén, Christer
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Säll, Torbjorn
    Department of Biology, Lund University.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Lidén, Annika C.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Ljung, R.
    Department of Pediatrics and Malmö Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Lund University.
    Origin of Swedish hemophilia A mutations2012Inngår i: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 1538-7933, E-ISSN 1538-7836, Vol. 10, nr 12, 2503-2511 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

     Background: Hemophilia A (HA) has a high level of variation within the disease class, with more than 1000 mutations being listed in the HAMSTeRS database. At the same time a number of F8 mutations are present in specific populations at high frequencies. Objectives: The simultaneous presence of large numbers of rare mutations and a small number of high-frequency mutations raises questions about the origins of HA mutations. The present study was aimed at describing the origins of HA mutations in the complete Swedish population. The primary issue was to determine what proportion of identical mutations are identical by descent (IBD) and what proportion are attributable to recurrent mutation events. The age of IBD mutations was also determined. Patients/Methods: In Sweden, the care of HA is centralized, and the Swedish HA population consists of ∼ 750 patients from > 300 families (35% severe, 15% moderate, and 50% mild). Identical haplotypes were defined by single-nucleotide polymorphism and microsatellite haplotyping, and the ages of the mutations were estimated with estiage. Results: Among 212 presumably unrelated patients with substitution mutations, 97 (46%) had mutations in common with other patients. Haplotyping of the 97 patients showed that 47 had IBD mutations (22%) with estimated ages of between two and 35 generations. The frequency of mild disease increased with an increasing number of patients sharing the mutations. Conclusions: A majority of the IBD mutations are mild and have age estimates of a few hundred years, but some could date back to the Middle Ages.

  • 3.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Dahlen, Anna
    Section of Clinical Genetics, Lund University Hospital.
    Hillarp, Andreas
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry, Lund University.
    Zöller, Bengt
    Center for Primary Health Care Research, Malmö University Hospital.
    Dahlbäck, Björn
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry, Lund University.
    Halldén, Christer
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Small and large PROS1 deletions but no other types of rearrangements detected in patients with protein S deficiency2012Inngår i: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 108, nr 1, 94-100 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein S deficiency is a dominantly inherited disorder that results from mutations in the PROS1 gene. Previous sequencing of the gene failed to detect mutations in eight out of 18 investigated Swedish families, whereas segregation analyses detected large deletions in three out of the eight families. The present study investigates more thoroughly for the presence of deletions but also for other types of rearrangements. FISH analysis confirmed the existence of the three previously identified large deletions, but failed to identify any other type of rearrangement among the eight analysed families. MLPA analysis of the PROS1 gene revealed two smaller deletions covering two and four exons, respectively. Thus, deletions could be found in five out of eight families where no point mutations could be found despite sequencing of the gene. Twelve additional, not previously analysed, families were subsequently analysed using MLPA. The analysis identified two smaller deletions (3 and 4 exons). Including all PS-deficient families, i.e. also the 10 families where sequencing found a causative point mutation, deletions were identified in seven out of 30 PS-deficient families. A strategy of sequencing followed by MLPA analysis in mutation-negative families identified the causative mutation in 15 out of 18 of Swedish PS-deficient families. Most deletions were different as determined by their sizes, locations and flanking haplotypes. FISH (8 families) and MLPA analysis (20 families) failed to identify other types of rearrangements.

  • 4.
    Ljung, R.
    et al.
    Lund University, Department of Paediatrics.
    Halldén, Christer
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Hemophilia A families with the same mutation are often related: a survey of the Swedish population2012Inngår i: Haemophilia (ISSN 1351-8216) 2012: 18 (supplement 3), p. 109, 2012, Vol. 18, nr Suppl. 3, 109-109 s.Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study if families with hemophilia A in Sweden carrying the same mutation are identical by descent (IBD) or the result of independent mutations (RM).

    Study group: A total of 284 presumed unrelated and unselected Swedish families with hemophilia A comprising all clinical severities. Control group of 254 healthy individuals.

    Methods: Haplotyping was performed using 90 SNP markers (18 within the F8 gene) and 5 microsatellite markers. The frequencies of shared haplotypes were determined in the control group and the ages of the shared haplotypes determined using the program ESTIAGE.

    Results: Analysis of the mutations gave the following results: inversions in introns 1 or 22 were detected in 71 cases, large deletions in 5, small deletions/insertions in 4, and substitutions in 204 patients. For substitutions, a total of 107 mutations occurred in a single individual only, whereas the remaining 35 mutations occurred in 2 or more individuals; 20 mutations occurred in 2 individuals, 9 mutations occurred in 3 individuals, m4 mutations occurred in 4 individuals, and 2 mutations occurred in 7 individuals each, i.e., 97 mutations out of 204 (47%) were either IBD or recurrent mutation. Haplotyping and comparisons with the control group classified 51 of the 97 mutations as IBD. The phenotypes of the 51 individuals were mild (31), moderate (5), and severe (8), and the corresponding mutations had age estimates varying between 150 and 700 years. Inhibitors occurred in both RM and IBD families. One IBD family with mild hemophilia (2105 Tyr>Cys) had 3 members who developed inhibitors.

    Conclusion: Many families with hemophilia A, in particular those with milder forms, carrying the same mutation are IBD, i.e., revision of ‘‘hot-spots’’ for mutation is needed. Few ‘‘clusters of inhibitors’’ were found.

  • 5.
    Ljung, R.
    et al.
    Lund University, Department of Paediatrics.
    Lidén, Annika
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Halldén, Christer
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Hemophilia B families with the same mutation are often related: a survey of the Swedish population2012Inngår i: Haemophilia (ISSN 1351-8216) 2012: 18 (supplement 3), p. 109, 2012, Vol. 18, nr Suppl. 3, 109-109 s.Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study if families with hemophilia B in Sweden carrying the same mutation are identical by descent (IBD) or the result of independent mutations (RM).

    Study group: A total of 77 presumed unrelated and unselected Swedish families with hemophilia B comprising all clinical severities (total and large deletions not included). Control group of 256 healthy individuals.

    Methods: Haplotyping was performed using 90 SNP markers (11 within the F9 gene) and 1 microsatellite marker. The frequencies of shared haplotypes were determined in the control group, and the ages of the shared haplotypes will be determined using the program ESTIAGE.

    Results: Analysis of the mutations gave the following results: 5 small deletions (<10bp), 2 small insertions (<10bp), 3 splice site mutations, 14 nonsense mutations, and 53 missense mutations. A total of 30 mutations (39%) occurred in a single individual only, whereas the remaining 47 mutations occurred in 2 or more individuals; 7 mutations occurred in 2 individuals, 4 mutations occurred in 3 individuals, 2 mutations occurred in 4 individuals, 1 mutation occurred in 6 individuals, and 1 mutation occurred in 7 individuals each, i.e., 47 mutations out of 77 (61%) were either IBD or recurrent mutation. Haplotyping and comparisons with the control group classified 21/47 mutations as IBD and 25/47 as RM. The phenotypes of the 21 IBD individuals were mild (17), moderate 2), and severe (1); those of the 25 RM individuals were mild (7), moderate (7), and severe (12). Age estimation of the mutations is ongoing.

    Conclusion: Many families with hemophilia B, in particular those with milder forms, carrying the same mutation are IBD, i.e., revision of ‘‘hot-spots’’ for mutation is needed.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Division of ENT Diseases, Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet.
    Andiappan, Anand Kumar
    Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore.
    Halldén, Christer
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Yun, Wang De
    Department of Otolaryngology, National University of Singapore.
    Säll, Torbjorn
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University.
    Tim, Chew Fook
    Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore.
    Cardell, Lars-Olaf
    Division of ENT Diseases, Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet.
    Toll-like receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with allergic rhinitis: a case control study2012Inngår i: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 13, nr 1, 66- s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:The Toll-like receptor proteins are important in host defense and initiation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. A number of studies have identified associations between genetic variation in the Toll-like receptor genes and allergic disorders such as asthma and allergic rhinitis. The present study aim to search for genetic variation associated with allergic rhinitis in the Toll-like receptor genes.

    METHODS:A first association analysis genotyped 73 SNPs in 182 cases and 378 controls from a Swedish population. Based on these results an additional 24 SNPs were analyzed in one Swedish population with 352 cases and 709 controls and one Chinese population with 948 cases and 580 controls.

    RESULTS:The first association analysis identified 4 allergic rhinitis-associated SNPs in the TLR7-TLR8 gene region. Subsequent analysis of 24 SNPs from this region identified 7 and 5 significant SNPs from the Swedish and Chinese populations, respectively. The corresponding riskassociated haplotypes are significant after Bonferroni correction and are the most common haplotypes in both populations. The associations are primarily detected in females in the Swedish population, whereas it is seen in males in the Chinese population. Further independent support for the involvement of this region in allergic rhinitis was obtained from quantitative skin prick test data generated in both populations.

    CONCLUSIONS:Haplotypes in the TLR7-TLR8 gene region were associated with allergic rhinitis in one Swedish and one Chinese population. Since this region has earlier been associated with asthma and allergic rhinitis in a Danish linkage study this speaks strongly in favour of this region being truly involved in the development of this disease.

  • 7.
    Psouni, Elia
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Janke, Axel
    LOEWE – Biodiversity and Climate Research Center – BiK-F, Senckenberganlage, Frankfurt am Main.
    Garwicz, Martin
    Neuronano Research Center, BMC F10, Lund University.
    Impact of carnivory on human development and evolution revealed by a new unifying model of weaning in mammals2012Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, nr 4, e32452- s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Our large brain, long life span and high fertility are key elements of human evolutionary success and are often thought to have evolved in interplay with tool use, carnivory and hunting. However, the specific impact of carnivory on human evolution, life history and development remains controversial. Here we show in quantitative terms that dietary profile is a key factor influencing time to weaning across a wide taxonomic range of mammals, including humans. In a model encompassing a total of 67 species and genera from 12 mammalian orders, adult brain mass and two dichotomous variables reflecting species differences regarding limb biomechanics and dietary profile, accounted for 75.5%, 10.3% and 3.4% of variance in time to weaning, respectively, together capturing 89.2% of total variance. Crucially, carnivory predicted the time point of early weaning in humans with remarkable precision, yielding a prediction error of less than 5% with a sample of forty-six human natural fertility societies as reference. Hence, carnivory appears to provide both a necessary and sufficient explanation as to why humans wean so much earlier than the great apes. While early weaning is regarded as essentially differentiating the genus <italic>Homo</italic> from the great apes, its timing seems to be determined by the same limited set of factors in humans as in mammals in general, despite some 90 million years of evolution. Our analysis emphasizes the high degree of similarity of relative time scales in mammalian development and life history across 67 genera from 12 mammalian orders and shows that the impact of carnivory on time to weaning in humans is quantifiable, and critical. Since early weaning yields shorter interbirth intervals and higher rates of reproduction, with profound effects on population dynamics, our findings highlight the emergence of carnivory as a process fundamentally determining human evolution.

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