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  • 1.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Musical interaction for health improvement2014Inngår i: Oxford handbook of interactive audio / [ed] Karen Collins, Bill Kapralos, Holly Tessler, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2014, 247-262 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past decade, tangible sensor technologies have matured and become less expensive and easier to use, leading to an explosion of innovative musical designs within video games, smartphone applications, and interactive art installations. Interactive audio has become an important design quality in commercially successful games like Guitar Hero , and a range of mobile phone applications motivating people to interact, play, dance, and collaborate with music. Parallel to the game, phone, and art scenes, an area of music and health research has grown, showing the positive results of using music to promote health and wellbeing in everyday situations and for a broad range of people, from children and elderly to people with psychological and physiological disabilities. Both quantitative medical and ecological humanistic research show that interaction with music can improve health, through music’s ability to evoke feelings, motivate people to interact, master, and cope with difficult situations, create social relations and experience shared meaning. Only recently, however, the music and health field has started to take interest in interactive audio, based on computer-mediated technologies’ potential for health improvement. Here, we show the potential of using interactive audio in what we call interactive musicking in the computer-based interactive environment Wave. Interactive musicking is based on musicologist Christopher Small’s concept “musicking”, meaning any form of relation-building that occurs between people, and people and things, related to activities that include music. For instance, musicking includes dancing, listening, and playing with music (in professional contexts and in amateur, everyday contexts). We have adapted the concept of "musicking" on the design of computer-based musical devices. The context for this chapter is the research project RHYME. RHYME is a multidisciplinary collaboration between the Centre for Music and Health at the Norwegian Academy of Music, the Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO), and Informatics at the University of Oslo. Our target group is families with children with severe disabilities. Our goal is to improve health and wellbeing in the families through everyday musicking activities in interactive environments. Our research approach is to use knowledge from music and health research, musical composition and improvisation, musical action research, musicology, music sociology, and soundscape studies, when designing the tangible interactive environments. Our focus here is interaction design and composition strategies, following research-by-design methodology, creating interactive musicking environments. We describe the research and design of the interactive musicking environment Wave, based on video documentation, during a sequence of actions. Our findings suggest some interactive audio design strategies to improve health. We base the design strategies on musical actions performed while playing an instrument, such as impulsive or iterative hitting, or sustainable stroking of an instrument. Musical actions like these can also be used for musicking in everyday contexts, creating direct sound responses to evoke feelings that create expectations and confirm interactions. In opposition to a more control-oriented, instrument and interface perspective, we argue that musical variation and narrative models can be used to design interactive audio, where the audio is seen as an actor taking many different roles, as instrument, co-musician, toy, etc. In this way, the audio and the interactive musicking environments will change over time, answering with direct response, as well as nose-thumbing and changing response, motivating creation, play, and social interaction. Musical variation can also be used to design musical backgrounds and soundscapes that can be used for creating layers of ambience. These models create a safe environment and contribute to shared meaning.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Vocal and tangible interaction in RHYME2014Inngår i: Music, Health, Technology and Design / [ed] Stensæth, Karette, Oslo: Norwegian Academy of Music , 2014, 21-38 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Our voice and body are important parts of our self-expression and self-experience for all of us. They are also essential for our way to communicate and build relations cross borders such as abilities, ages, locations and backgrounds. Voice, body and tangibility gradually become more important for Information and Communication Technology (ICT), due to increased development of tangible interaction and mobile communication. The voice and tangible interaction therefore also become more important for the fields of Assistive Technology, Health Technology and Universal Design. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our on-going research project RHYME. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible and sensorial media. We build on use of voice in Music Therapy, knowledge from multi-sensory stimulation and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible interactive media that are sensorially stimulating. Interactive media that through use, can reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for all the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross-media techniques, to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate voice-body connections, positive emotions and structures for actions.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Vocal and tangible technology for music and health2013Inngår i: Book of abstracts: setting the tone: cultures of relating and reflecting in music therapy / [ed] Gro Trondalen, Oslo: The Norwegian Academy of Music , 2013, 24-24 s.Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Our voice and body are important parts of our self-expression and self-experience. They are also essential for our way to communicate and build relations cross borders like abilities, ages, locations, backgrounds and cultures. Voice and tangibility gradually become more important when developing new music technology for the Music Therapy and the Music and Health fields, due to new technology possibilities that have recently arisen. For example smartphones, computer games and networked, social media services like Skype. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our ongoing research project. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with severe disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible sensorial media. We build on use of voice in Music Therapy and studies by Lisa Sokolov, Diane Austin, Kenneth Bruscia and Joanne Loewy. Further we build on knowledge from Multi-sensory stimulation and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible, sensorially stimulating interactive media, that through use reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for all the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross- media techniques, to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate body- voice connections, positive emotions and structures for actions. The reflections in this paper build on action research methods, video observations and research-by-design methods. We reflect on observations of families and close others with children with severe disabilities, interacting in three vocal and tangible installations.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    Oslo School of Architecture & Design.
    Olofsson, Fredrik
    Designing sound for recreation and well-being2014Inngår i: Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME 2014) / [ed] Baptiste Caramiaux, Koray Tahiroğlu, Rebecca Fiebrink, Atau Tanaka, 2014, 529-532 s.Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore how we compose sound for an interactive tangible and mobile interface, where the goal is to improve health and well-being for families with children with disabilities. We describe the composition process of how we decompose a linear beat-based and vocal sound material and recompose it with real-time audio synthesis and composition rules into interactive Scenes. Scenes that make it possible for the users to select, explore and recreate different sound worlds. In order to recreate, the users interact with the tangible interface in different ways, as instrument, play with it as a friend, improvise and create music and relax with it as ambient sounding furniture. We discuss composition techniques for mixing sound, tangible-physical and lighting elements in the Scenes. Based on observations we explore how a diverse audience in the family and at school can recreate and improvise their own sound experience and play together in open and non-therapeutic everyday situations. We conclude by discussing the possible impact of our findings for the NIME-community; how the techniques of decomposing, recomposing and recreating sound, based on a relational perspective, could contribute to the design of new instruments for musical expression.

  • 5.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Designing four generations of 'Musicking Tangibles'2014Inngår i: Music, Health, Technology and Design / [ed] Stensæth, Karette, Oslo: Norwegian Academy of Music , 2014, 1-20 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    n this article we present a novel approach for the understanding and the design of interactive health improving music technology, what we call Musicking Tangibles. The Musicking Tangibles approach represents an alternative approach to the traditional instrument, interface and switch-oriented music technology perspective. Our approach combines a humanistic, resource and empowerment oriented health approach with an aesthetic and culture based design approach towards music technology. We present four empowering and health improving qualities for the Musicking Tangibles. These qualities emphasize to: 1) Continually evoke interest and positive emotions relevant to diverse users’ interpretation of the tangibles and the situation; 2) Dynamically offer the users many roles to take, many musicking actions to make and many ways to express themselves; 3) Offer the users aesthetically consistent responses and build relevant cross-media expectations and challenges over time and space, consistent with their character; 4) Offer the users many relations to make: to people, things, experiences, events and places. Further we present and argue for some design solutions of the Musicking Tangibles ORFI, WAVE, REFLECT, and the POLLY World from the RHYME-project. In developing POLLY we have tried to put together as many design qualities as possible, to exemplify our view and current understanding.

  • 6.
    Olsson, Ann-Margreth E.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan. Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Avdelningen för Ekonomi.
    När en anhörig går ut i krig: utforskande av sociala konsekvenser och utveckling av det sociala stödet – före, under, efter och se’n2013Inngår i: Avgörandets år 1813 – på väg mot den långa freden: the decisive year of 1813 – Sweden on the road to stable peace / [ed] Bitr. professor Ingemar Ottosson, 2013Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 7.
    Olsson, Ann-Margreth E.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Avdelningen för Samhällsvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO).
    Responsive understanding from within conducting social investigations in social work2014Inngår i: Beyond professional monologue: rendering oppressed voices audible in reflexive dialogical practice and research / [ed] Gail Simon, 2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In this Dialogical Participatory Action Research (DPAR) study we were exploring and developing dialogical coaching in social work with M.M. Bakhtin as one of the most important inspiration sources. The investigating social workers had traditionally been trained to seek neutral approach and external clarity. In the study the social workers started to invite the children to participate as partners in conducting the social investigations creating increasing mutual involvement in dialogical interplay and collaboration. When the social workers addressed the children, inviting the children and their families into a mutually involving dialogical participation, exploring and inquiring both the risks and the strengths of the child’s relationships, the social workers wanted to obtain a responsive understanding, that is, getting an understanding from within the family system and the child’s perspective. In dialogical conversations it became possible for the social worker to act and support changes improving the lives of the children from within the perspective of the children. Hearing the voice of the child, in the way the child chooses to speak, the social worker was given an idea of the communicative style and orientation in the family as well as of the social conditions, from the child’s point of view, including the child’s strategies in managing his or her situation. In the coaching the social workers explored how every unique speech experience became shaped and developed in continuous and constant interaction with others’ utterances and narratives. In the study was traced, together with participating social workers, examples, ideas and narratives given in the context of the research which were experienced as striking or special events – once-occurrent events of being – examples that emerged for the participants as important and significant for the progress and impact of the projects and the study.

  • 8.
    Rahm, Henrik
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Andersson, Magdalena
    Malmö Högskola.
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    The collective voice: legitimation strategies in focus group discussion with nurses in municipal palliative care for older people in Sweden2014Inngår i: Communication & Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society, ISSN 1612-1783, E-ISSN 1613-3625, Vol. 11, nr 2, 167-177 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores focus group discussions of registered nurses in municipal palliative care for older people, using data collected by researchers with an interest in health sciences. The linguistically based discourse analyis builds on a combination of Bakhtinian notions of dialogicity, the Other and addressivity, the use of quotations, and also van Leeuwen’s framework for legitimation in discourse. The aim is to investigate strategies of addressing and legitimizing palliative care. Three types of narrative are discerned: the cautionary tale, fictionalization of professional experiences and the enactment of a fictive dialogue. The other professions involved (physicians, assistant nurses) are positioned as the Other as a means of legitimizing the perspectives of the registered nurses. As the patients and their next of kin are the objects of professional activities, the notion of the Third (connecting to the Other) is proposed. The objectification is a manifestation of commitment with routinized and professional distance to the patients.

  • 9.
    Simon, Gail
    et al.
    England.
    Kebbe, Lisen
    Kebbe & Sandström, Sweden.
    Olsson, Ann-Margreth E.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsplattformen för Hälsa i samverkan. Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle.
    Vedeler, Anne Hedvig
    Norge.
    Creating dialogical pop-up installations in public spaces2017Inngår i: Murmurations: Journal of Transformative Systemic Practice,, ISSN 2516-0052, Vol. 1, nr 1, 1-17 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel, reflekterar vi över tankar från vår forskning inifrån spontana dialogiska förlopp, studerade genom dialogiska pop-up installationer där vi själva deltar. Vi erbjuder ett kollage av anekdoter från våra yrkesverksamheter, från våra personliga liv och från de dialogiska installationerna. Dessa episoder ger nya infallsvinklar och kastar nytt ljus på teman och värderingar i vår  dagliga praktik. Genom vårt arbete på gatorna ser vi: i) att det kräver mod att göra något för och med människor; ii) att vi alltid är involverade i att skapa dialogiska rum; iii) hur vi byter ut planering mot förberedelse; iv) att dialoger alltid påverkas av och i sin tur påverkar kontexten; v) att skrivande i collageform och mixed media, gör det möjligt att experimentera med nya former och dela lite av mo(ve)ments från installationerna.

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