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  • 1.
    Bengtsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Avril, Alexis
    Linnaeus University.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Norevik, Gabriel
    Ottenby Bird Observatory.
    Tolf, Conny
    Linnaeus University.
    Safi, Kamran
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology.
    Fiedler, Wolfgang
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology.
    Wikelski, Martin
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology.
    Olsen, Bjorn
    Uppsala University.
    Waldenstrom, Jonas
    Linnaeus University.
    Movements, home-range size and habitat selection of mallards during autumn migration2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 6, p. e100764-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) is a focal species in game management, epidemiology and ornithology, but comparably little research has focused on the ecology of the migration seasons. We studied habitat use, time-budgets, home-range sizes, habitat selection, and movements based on spatial data collected with GPS devices attached to wild mallards trapped at an autumn stopover site in the Northwest European flyway. Sixteen individuals (13 males, 3 females) were followed for 15-38 days in October to December 2010. Forty-nine percent (SD = 8.4%) of the ducks' total time, and 85% of the day-time (SD = 28.3%), was spent at sheltered reefs and bays on the coast. Two ducks used ponds, rather than coast, as day-roosts instead. Mallards spent most of the night (76% of total time, SD = 15.8%) on wetlands, mainly on alvar steppe, or in various flooded areas (e.g. coastal meadows). Crop fields with maize were also selectively utilized. Movements between roosting and foraging areas mainly took place at dawn and dusk, and the home-ranges observed in our study are among the largest ever documented for mallards (mean = 6,859 ha; SD = 5,872 ha). This study provides insights into relatively unknown aspects of mallard ecology. The fact that autumn-staging migratory mallards have a well-developed diel activity pattern tightly linked to the use of specific habitats has implications for wetland management, hunting and conservation, as well as for the epidemiology of diseases shared between wildlife and domestic animals.

  • 2.
    Champagnon, Jocelyn
    et al.
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, Arles.
    Crochet, P. A.
    Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, UMR 5175 – CNRS, Montpellier.
    Kreisinger, J.
    Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague.
    Čížková, D.
    Department of Population Biology, Institute of Vertebrate Biology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Brno.
    Gauthier-Clerc, M.
    Centre de Recherche de la Tour du Valat, Arles.
    Massez, G.
    Les Marais du Vigueirat, Arles.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Albrecht, T.
    Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague.
    Guillemain, M.
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, Arles.
    Assessing the genetic impact of massive restocking on wild mallard2013In: Animal Conservation, ISSN 1367-9430, E-ISSN 1469-1795, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 295-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Captive-bred mallards Anas platyrhynchos have been released for hunting purposes at a very large scale in Europe since the mid-1970s. In spite of a potential genetic impact, the actual contribution of restocked mallards to the genome of the target population has received little attention. The genetic structure of modern wild mallards in the Camargue, Southern France, was assessed from two samples: one originating from shot birds in hunting bags and one from presumed wild ducks captured alive in a hunting-free reserve. Reference samples originated from five mallard farms, as well as from museum samples collected before the mid-1970s (i.e. before massive mallard releases started). Our results revealed that the genetic signature of wild wintering mallards has not changed significantly because museum and presumed wild samples from the Camargue hunting-free nature reserve were genetically similar, and clearly differentiated from the farm mallards. This suggests that mallard releases in the Camargue or elsewhere in France, although massive, have not actually translated into complete admixture of wild and captive genomes, most likely due to low survival of released birds once in the wild. Nevertheless, although genetic introgression of the wild population by captive-bred was contained, we found significant rates of hybridization between wild and captive-bred mallards in modern samples. This result suggests that long-term releases of captive-bred mallards, if carried on at such large scale, could compromise irreversibly the genetic structure and composition of European mallards. This work contributes to fill in the gap on the monitoring of the genetic consequences of large-scale game releases for exploitation.

  • 3.
    Dalby, Lars
    et al.
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Christensen, Thomas K.
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Clausen, Preben
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Einarsson, Árni
    Myvatn Research Station, Iceland.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Fox, Anthony D.
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Holmqvist, Niklas
    Swedish Association for Hunting and Wildlife Management, Öster Malma, Nyköping.
    Langendoen, Tom
    Wetlands International, Wageningen.
    Lehikoinen, Aleksi
    Finnish Museum of Natural History, University of Helsinki.
    Lindström, Åke
    Department of Biology,Biodiversity, Lund University.
    Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Trondheim.
    Nilsson, Leif
    Department of Biology, Biodiversity, Lund University.
    Pöysä, Hannu
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Joensuu Game and Fisheries Research.
    Sigfússon, Arnór Þ.
    Verkís, Reykjavik.
    Svenning, Jens-Christian
    Ecoinformatics & Biodiversity Group, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    The status of the Nordic populations of the Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) in a changing world2013In: Ornis Fennica, ISSN 0030-5685, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 2-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dabbling ducks (Anas spp.) are importantmigratory quarry species, protected as a shared resource under international legislation. However, there is a lack of sufficient high-quality data on vital demographic rates and long-term trends in numbers to judge the conservation status of many duck populations at the flyway level. In response to reported declines in the North-West European flyway population of theMallard, we compiled available data on this species in the Nordic countries up to 2010. Generally, national breeding numbers showed increasing trends, wintering abundance showed variable trends, and productivitymeasures indicated stable or increasing trends.Major knowledge gaps were identified, namely the size of hunting bags, the influence of the released Mallards and the role of short-stopping in explaining changing patterns of wintering abundance across the North-West European flyway. Numerically the Nordic breeding population appears in “good condition”, and the wintering numbers have been either stable or increasing in the last two decades. The annual number of releases needs to be determined in order to judge the sustainability of the current levels of exploitation. Overall, none of the indicators showed alarming signs for the Mallard population in the Nordic countries when considered in isolation. However, the widespread decline in wintering numbers elsewhere across North-western Europe requires urgent pan-European action.

  • 4.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Hur utsatta är utsatta änder?2012In: Vår fågelvärld, ISSN 0042-2649, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 40-42Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Utsättningar av djur och växter har förekommit mycket länge. Slottens svandammar har kommit till av detta skäl, godsen har satt ut jaktbart vilt. Jordbruk och skogsbruk bygger på idén att plantera ut för att sedan skörda, och även naturvården ägnar sig åt ”stödutplanteringar”. Ingen fågelart sätts ut i så stora antal som gräsanden. Men vad är det för änder det handlar om? Vilka blir effekterna?

  • 5.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Utsatta änder inte som vilda2018In: Svensk Jakt, no 10, p. 51-51Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Vad händer med utsatta änder?2012In: Svensk Jakt, ISSN 0039-6583, Vol. 150, no 8, p. 88-89Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Thulin, Carl-Gustaf
    SLU, Umeå.
    Champagnon, Jocelyn
    Frankrike.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Frankrike.
    Kreisinger, Jakub
    Tjeckien.
    Prins, H. H. T.
    Nederländerna.
    Crooijmans, R. P. M. A.
    Nederländerna.
    Kraus, R. H. S.
    Tyskland.
    Farmed European mallards are genetically different and cause introgression in the wild population following releases2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The practice of restocking already viable populations to increase harvest potential has since long been common in forestry, fisheries and wildlife management. The potential risks of restocking native species have long been overshadowed by the related issue of invasive alien species. However, during the last decade releases of native species with potentially non-native genome have received more attention. A suitable model to study genetic effects of large-scale releases of native species is the Mallard Anas platyrhynchos, being the most widespread duck in the world, largely migratory, and an important quarry species. More than 3 million unfledged hatchlings are released each year around Europe to increase local harvest. The aims of this study were to determine if wild and released farmed Mallards differ genetically, if there are signs of previous or ongoing introgression between wild and farmed birds, and if the genetic structure of the wild Mallard population has changed since large-scale releases started in Europe in the 1970s. Using 360 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) we found that the genetic structure differed among historical wild, present-day wild, and farmed Mallards in Europe. We also found signs of introgression in the wild Mallard population, that is, individuals with a genetic background of farmed stock are part of the present free-living population. Although only a small proportion of the released Mallards appears to survive to merge with the free-living breeding population, their numbers are still so large that the genetic impact may have significance for the wild population in terms of individual survival and longterm fitness.

  • 8.
    Fox, Anthony D.
    et al.
    Aarhus University.
    Jonsson, Jon Einar
    University of Iceland.
    Aarvak, Tomas
    Norwegian Ornithological Society .
    Bregnballe, Thomas
    Aarhus University.
    Christensen, Thomas Kjaer
    Aarhus University.
    Clausen, Kevin Kuhlmann
    Aarhus University.
    Clausen, Preben
    Aarhus University.
    Dalby, Lars
    Aarhus University.
    Holm, Thomas Eske
    Aarhus University.
    Pavon-Jordan, Diego
    University of Helsinki.
    Laursen, Karsten
    Aarhus University.
    Lehikoinen, Aleksi
    University of Helsinki.
    Lorentsen, Svein-Hakon
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research.
    Moller, Anders Pape
    University of Paris .
    Nordstrom, Mikael
    Metsahallitus Pk & Wildlife, Finland.
    Ost, Markus
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Soderquist, Par
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Therkildsen, Ole Roland
    Aarhus University.
    Current and potential threats to Nordic duck populations - a horizon scanning exercise2015In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 193-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We review the current and future threats to duck populations that breed, stage, moult and/or winter in the Nordic countries. Migratory duck species are sensitive indicators of their changing environment, and their societal value confirms the need to translate signals from changes in their distribution, status and abundance into a better understanding of changes occurring in their wetland environments. We used expert opinion to highlight 25 major areas of anthropogenic change (and touch briefly on potential mitigation measures through nature restoration and reserve management projects) that we consider key issues likely to influence Nordic duck populations now and in the near future to stimulate debate, discussion and further research. We believe such reviews are essential in contributing to development of successful management policy as well as stimulating specific research to support the maintenance of duck species in favourable future conservation status in the face of multiple population pressures and drivers.

  • 9.
    Kraus, R. H. S.
    et al.
    Tyskland.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Thulin, C.-G.
    Umeå University.
    Champagnon, Jocelyn
    Frankrike.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Frankrike.
    Kreisinger, Jakub
    Tjeckien.
    Prins, H. H. T.
    Nederländerna.
    Crooijmans, R. P. M. A.
    Nederländerna.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Freigelassenes Federwild führt zu kontinent-weiter genetischer Introgression: die sich ändernde genetische Landschaft der Stockente (Anas platyrhynchos) in Europa2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Kraus, R.H.S.
    et al.
    Tyskland.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Thulin, Carl-Gustaf
    Umeå university.
    Champagnon, Jocelyn
    Frankrike.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Frankrike.
    Kreisinger, Jakub
    Tjeckien.
    Prins, H.H.T.
    Nederländerna.
    Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.
    Nederländerna.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Freigelassenes Federwild führt zu kontinent-weiter genetischer Introgression: die sich ändernde genetische Landschaft der Stockente Anas platyrhynchos in Europa2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Es ist eine seit langem übliche Praxis in Forstwirtschaft, Fischerei und allgemeinem Wildtiermanagement, Wildtierbestände gezielt aufzustocken. In den letzten ca. zehn Jahren haben aber solche Programme Aufmerksamkeit erregt, in denen lokale Bestände von Tierarten mit Individuen der gleichen Art, aber aus anderen Regionen und damit potentiell nicht-nativen Genomen aufgestockt wurden. Die Stockente Anas platyrhynchos ist ein geeignetes Modell um die genetischen Effekte solcher großskaligen Freisetzungen auf den einheimischen Genpool zu untersuchen, weil sie die am weitesten verbreitete und zahlreichste Entenart der Welt ist, über weite Strecken migrieren kann und gleichzeitig global das wichtigste Federwild darstellt. In vielen europäischen Ländern wird die Stockente seit etwa den frühen 1970er Jahren auch auf speziellen Farmen gezüchtet und zu Jagdzwecken ausgesetzt. So gehen aktuelle Schätzungen davon aus, dass jährlich etwa drei Millionen junge Enten nur zum Zweck der Aufstockung zur Jagd an europäischen Gewässern ausgesetzt werden. Die Ziele unserer Studie waren herauszufinden, ob sich Enten von Farmpopulationen genetisch von wilden Enten unterscheiden lassen, ob es Anzeichen früherer oder anhaltender genetischer Introgression zwischen diesen beiden Gruppen gibt und ob sich die genetische Struktur der wilden Entenpopulationen seit der großskaligen Entenaufstockung verändert hat. Dazu verwendeten wir 360 SNP Marker (Single Nucleotide Polymorhpism) um die genetische Struktur von historischen wilden Stockenten (Museumsproben), zeitgenössischen wilden Stockenten und Farm-Enten zu vergleichen (N = 591). Wir fanden klare genetische Unterschiede zwischen wilden Stockenten und Farm-Enten in mehreren Ländern Europas. Ebenfalls konnten wir genetische Introgression von Genen der Farm-Enten in die wilde Stockentenpopulation zeigen. Die Vermischung scheint bisher zwar messbar aber noch gering zu sein, da auf Farmen gezüchtete Stockenten in der Wildnis geringe Überlebensraten aufweisen. Dennoch sollte die weitere Einkreuzung von Farm-Enten in die wilden Stockentenpopulationen so gering wie möglich gehalten werden, da durch anhaltende genetische Introgression möglicherweise in Zukunft lokale Anpassungen der wilden Stockenten geschwächt werden, was eine Bedrohung dieser Bestände darstellen könnte.

  • 11.
    Pöysä, Hannu
    et al.
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Joensuu Game and Fisheries Research.
    Dessborn, Lisa
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Nummi, Petri
    Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki.
    Sjöberg, Kjell
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå.
    Suhonen, Sari
    Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Harvest mortality in North American mallards: a reply to Sedinger and Herzog2013In: Journal of Wildlife Management, ISSN 0022-541X, E-ISSN 1937-2817, Vol. 77, no 4, p. 653-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sedinger and Herzog (2012) evaluated the evidence for the impact harvest mortality may have on North American duck populations. While doing that, they questioned our review (Pöysä et al. 2004) and conclusion that harvest mortality in North American mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) may have shifted from compensatory to additive over the period from the 1960s to the 1980s. In this reply, we correct Sedinger and Herzog's misrepresentations of our 2004 paper and argue that our interpretations of the results published at that time have not been invalidated.

  • 12.
    Söderquist, Per
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    "Hjälp oss kartlägga gräsandens genetik!"2011In: Vår fågelvärld, ISSN 0042-2649, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 40-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Large-scale releases of native species: the mallard as a predictive model system2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Human alteration of natural systems, and its consequences are of great concern and the impact on global ecosystems is one of the biggest threats that biodiversity stands before. Translocations of invasive species, as well as intraspecific contingents with non-native genotypes, whether they are deliberate or unintentional, are one such alteration and its consequences are continuously being assessed. The mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) is the most numerous and widespread duck in the world and a flagship in wetland conservation. It is also an important game species which is heavily restocked for hunting purposes, especially in Europe where over three million ducklings are released every year. Because of its hunted status, its abundance, and the number of released individuals, it can serve as a model species to study effects of releases, both for conservation and restocking for hunting, on wild populations. In this thesis the status of the mallard was assessed in the Nordic countries and the effects of releases on the wild populations were studied by mining historical ringing data, comparing morphology of present-day wild, farmed, and historical mallards, and analyzing phylogeography of wild and farmed mallards in Europe. The status of the mallard population in the Nordic countries are generally good, however, a joint effort of European countries is needed to monitor and manage the population. A significant difference between wild and farmed mallards concerning longevity, migration, bill morphology and genetic structure was also found, together with signs of cryptic introgression of farmed genotypes in the wild population with potential fitness reduction as a result. The effect is however limited by that only a fraction of released farmed mallards reach the breeding season due to low survival. A natural captive environment is crucial to keep individuals wild-like with high survival rates after release. However, with an introgression of potentially maladapted farmed genotypes leading to a reduction in fitness, a low survival of released mallards would favor the wild population. A legislative change regarding obligation to report numbers, provenance, and release sites of farmed mallard should be considered, together with practical solutions of ringing and genetic monitoring of released mallards.

  • 14.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Large-scale releases of native species: the mallard as a predictive model system2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Human alteration of natural systems, and its consequences are of great concern and the impact on global ecosystems is one of the biggest threats that biodiversity stands before. Translocations of invasive species, as well as intraspecific contingents with non-native genotypes, whether they are deliberate or unintentional, are one such alteration and its consequences are continuously being assessed. The mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) is the most numerous and widespread duck in the world and a flagship in wetland conservation. It is also an important game species which is heavily restocked for hunting purposes, especially in Europe where over three million ducklings are released every year. Because of its hunted status, its abundance, and the number of released individuals, it can serve as a model species to study effects of releases, both for conservation and restocking for hunting, on wild populations. In this thesis the status of the mallard was assessed in the Nordic countries and the effects of releases on the wild populations were studied by mining historical ringing data, comparing morphology of present-day wild, farmed, and historical mallards, and analyzing phylogeography of wild and farmed mallards in Europe. The status of the mallard population in the Nordic countries are generally good, however, a joint effort of European countries is needed to monitor and manage the population. A significant difference between wild and farmed mallards concerning longevity, migration, bill morphology and genetic structure was also found, together with signs of cryptic introgression of farmed genotypes in the wild population with potential fitness reduction as a result. The effect is however limited by that only a fraction of released farmed mallards reach the breeding season due to low survival. A natural captive environment is crucial to keep individuals wild-like with high survival rates after release. However, with an introgression of potentially maladapted farmed genotypes leading to a reduction in fitness, a low survival of released mallards would favor the wild population. A legislative change regarding obligation to report numbers, provenance, and release sites of farmed mallard should be considered, together with practical solutions of ringing and genetic monitoring of released mallards.

  • 15.
    Söderquist, Pär
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Effekter av utsättningar av farmade änder ämnade för jakt2018In: Man and Biosphere Health –: en komplett akademisk miljö / [ed] Rehnstam-Holm, A.-S., Kristianstad: Högskolan Kristianstad , 2018, p. 41-47Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I över 40 år har det i Sverige pågått ett storskaligt, ekologiskt experiment där hundratusentals gräsänder årligen har fötts upp i fångenskap och satts ut i våtmarker för att öka på den jaktbara populationen. Genom uppfödning i fångenskap riskerar man att de farmade gräsänderna blir annorlunda gentemot de vilda. För att studera effekterna på den vilda populationen av dessa utsättningar startades 2010 ett doktorandprojekt finansierat av Naturvårdsverket. Projektet kom fram till att farmade änder skiljer sig i beteende och utseende mot de vilda. Det går även att genetiskt skilja på farmade och vilda gräsänder. Ett nytt projekt startades 2017 för att vidare studera effekter av utsättningar, nu även på miljön och den biologiska mångfalden där änderna sätts ut. Projekten om effekter av utsättningar av farmade änder involverar forskare från olika lärosäten i Sverige, men också från flera olika europeiska länder. Ett nära samarbete med olika lokala privata aktörer som uppfödare, markägare, jägare och viltmästare samt större organisationer somViltmästareförbundet och Svenska Jägareförbundet är avgörande för projektens framgång. Att kommuniceraresultaten på så väl vetenskapliga konferenser som för icke akademiker involverade i projekten samt i undervisning på Högskolan Kristianstad och på gymnasieskolor har hela tiden varit en målsättning. Projekten har också en tydlig plats i forskningsmiljön MABH vars kompetenser inom t.ex. vattenvård, sjukdomsspridning och landskapsutnyttjande kanknytas till projekten.

  • 16.
    Söderquist, Pär
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Utsatta änder – så går det för dem2014In: Svensk jakt, ISSN 0039-6583, Vol. 152, no 12, p. 72-73Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Söderquist, Pär
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Thulin, Carl-Gustaf
    Champagnon, Jocelyn
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Kreisinger, Jakub
    Prins, Herbert
    Crooijmans, R
    Kraus, Robert
    Released game birds cause introgression in European mallard2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The practice of restocking already viable populations to improve harvest has since long been common in forestry, fisheries and wildlife management. The potential risks with restocking of native species has for a long time been overshadowed by the related issue of invasive species. However, during the last decade releases of native species with a potential non-native genome have attained more attention. A suitable model species for studying genetic effects of large-scale releases of a native species is the Mallard, Anas platyrhynchos; it is the most widespread duck in the world, it is a migrating species, and an important game bird. In several European countries it is also farmed and released to increase the harvestable population, and more than 3 million unfledged hatchlings are released each year around Europe. The aims of this study were to determine if wild and released farmed Mallards differed genetically among subpopulations in Europe, if there are signs of previous or ongoing introgression between wild and farmed Mallards, and if the genetic structure of the wild Mallard population has changed since large-scale releases started in the 1970s. We used 360 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) to analyze the genetic structure of historical wild, present-day wild, and farmed Mallards. We found a clear genetic difference between wild and farmed Mallards in Europe. We also found signs of introgression of farmed genes in the wild Mallard population, however, the rate of hybridization is probably minor due to low survival of released farmed Mallards and a change of the wild population since the start of large-scale releases is therefore limited. A low level of hybridization between farmed and wild Mallard is desired as introgressed genes may be detrimental for wild Mallards, and efforts to increase survival of farmed Mallards should therefore not be encouraged.

  • 18.
    Söderquist, Pär
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Thulin, Carl-Gustaf
    SLU, Umeå.
    Champagnon, Jocelyn
    Frankrike.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Frankrike.
    Kreisinger, Jakub
    Tjeckien.
    Prins, Herbert
    Nederländerna.
    Crooijmans, Richard
    Nederländerna.
    Kraus, Robert
    Tyskland.
    Released gamebrds cause introgression in European mallard2015In: 4th Pan-European Duck Symposium, Hangö, Finland, 2015, p. 75-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The practice of restocking already viable populations to improve harvest has since long been common in forestry, fisheries and wildlife management. The potential risks with restocking of native species has for a long time been overshadowed by the related issue of invasive species. However, during the last decade releases of native species with a potential non-native genome have attained more attention. A suitable model species for studying genetic effects of large-scale releases of a native species is the Mallard, Anas platyrhynchos; it is the most widespread duck in the world, it is a migrating species, and an important game bird. In several European countries it is also farmed and released to increase the harvestable population, and more than 3 million unfledged hatchlings are released each year around Europe. The aims of this study were to determine if wild and released farmed Mallards differed genetically among subpopulations in Europe, if there are signs of previous or ongoing introgression between wild and farmed Mallards, and if the genetic structure of the wild Mallard population has changed since large-scale releases started in the 1970s. We used 360 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) to analyze the genetic structure of historical wild, present-day wild, and farmed Mallards. We found a clear genetic difference between wild and farmed Mallards in Europe. We also found signs of introgression of farmed genes in the wild Mallard population, however, the rate of hybridization is probably minor due to low survival of released farmed Mallards and a change of the wild population since the start of large-scale releases is therefore limited. A low level of hybridization between farmed and wild Mallard is desired as introgressed genes may be detrimental for wild Mallards, and efforts to increase survival of farmed Mallards should therefore not be encouraged.

  • 19.
    Söderquist, Pär
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Thulin, C-G
    University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Champagnon, J
    Frankrike.
    Guillemain, M
    Frankrike.
    Kreisinger, J
    Tjeckien.
    Prins, H T
    Holland.
    Crooijmans, R. P. M. A.
    Holland.
    R. H. S., Kraus
    Admixture between released and wild game birds: a changing genetic landscape in European mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)2017In: European Biophysics Journal, ISSN 0175-7571, E-ISSN 1432-1017, Vol. 63, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disruption of naturally evolved spatial patterns of genetic variation and local adaptations is a growing concern in wildlife management and conservation. During the last decade, releases of native taxa with potentially non-native genotypes have received increased attention. This has mostly concerned conservation programs, but releases are also widely carried out to boost harvest opportunities. The mallard, Anas platyrhynchos, is one of few terrestrial migratory vertebrates subjected to large-scale releases for hunting purposes. It is the most numerous and widespread duck in the world, yet each year more than three million farmed mallard ducklings are released into the wild in the European Union alone to increase the harvestable population. This study aimed to determine the genetic effects of such large-scale releases of a native species, specifically if wild and released farmed mallards differ genetically among subpopulations in Europe, if there are signs of admixture between the two groups, if the genetic structure of the wild mallard population has changed since large-scale releases began in the 1970s, and if the current data matches global patterns across the Northern hemisphere. We used Bayesian clustering (Structure software) and Discriminant Analysis of Principal Components (DAPC) to analyze the genetic structure of historical and present-day wild (n = 171 and n = 209, respectively) as well as farmed (n = 211) mallards from six European countries as inferred by 360 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Both methods showed a clear genetic differentiation between wild and farmed mallards. Admixed individuals were found in the present-day wild population, implicating introgression of farmed genotypes into wild mallards despite low survival among released farmed mallards. Such cryptic introgression would alter the genetic composition of wild populations and may have unknown long-term consequences for conservation.

  • 20.
    Söderquist, Pär
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Thulin, C.-G.
    Champagnon, Jocelyn
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Kreisinger, J.
    Prins, H
    Crooijmans, R.
    Kraus, R.
    Released game birds cause continent-wide introgression: a changing genetic landscape in European mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Söderquist, Pär
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Longevity and migration distance differ between wild and hand-reared mallards Anas platyrhynchos in Northern Europe2013In: European Journal of Wildlife Research, ISSN 1612-4642, E-ISSN 1439-0574, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 150-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mallard Anas platyrhynchos is the world’s most widespread and numerous dabbling duck. It is also farmed and released to the wild by the millions each year, but the effects of this on wild populations remain little studied. By using historical national ringing–recovery data from Sweden and Finland, we here address three predictions based on previous studies: (1) longevity is higher in wild than in hand-reared mallards, (2) wild mallards migrate longer than hand-reared, and (3) migration distance in wild ducks surviving long enough to start fall migration has decreased over the last 50 years. Indeed, wild mallards lived longer than hand-reared (19 versus 9 months in Swedish birds and 13 versus 4 months in Finnish birds). Compared to wild mallards, a smaller proportion of hand-reared birds survived long enough to have the chance to enter the wild breeding population; less than 25 % of the Swedish birds and less than 10 % of the Finnish birds lived a year or longer. Wild birds migrated farther than hand-reared (mean distance in Swedish birds, 676 versus 523 km; in Finnish birds, 1,213 versus 157 km), a pattern caused by both shorter life span and lower migration speed in hand-reared birds. Mean migration distance in wild Swedish mallards was 787 km in 1947–1972 but 591 km in 1977–1993. This difference was not statistically significant, though, possibly due to the limited sample size and lack of data from the last two decades. In general, our study provides a conservative test of the predictions addressed, calling for more research about the consequences of restocking duck populations.

  • 22.
    Söderquist, Pär
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Norrström, Joanna
    Kristianstad University.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Frankrike.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Wild mallards have more "goose-like" bills than their ancestors2015In: 4th Pan-European Duck Symposium, Hangö, Finland, 7-11/4, 2015, 2015, p. 38-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wild populations of the world’s most common dabbling duck, the Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), run the risk of genetic introgression by farmed conspecifics released for hunting purposes. We tested whether bill morphology of free-living birds has changed since large-scale releases of farmed Mallards started. Three groups of Mallards from Sweden, Norway and Finland were compared: historical wild (before large-scale releases started), present-day wild, and present-day farmed. Higher density of bill lamellae was observed in historical wild Mallards (only males). Farmed Mallards had wider bills than present-day and historical wild ones. Present-day wild and farmed Mallards also had higher and shorter bills than historical wild Mallards. Present-day Mallards thus tend to have more ‘‘goose-like’’ bills (wider, higher, and shorter) than their ancestors. Our study suggests that surviving released Mallards affect morphological traits in wild population by introgression. We discuss how such anthropogenic impact may lead to a maladapted and genetically compromised wild Mallard population. Our study system has bearing on other taxa where large-scale releases of conspecifics with ‘alien genes’ may cause a cryptic invasive process that nevertheless has fitness consequences for individual birds.

  • 23.
    Söderquist, Pär
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Norrström, Joanna
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Wild Mallards have more ”goose-like” bills than their ancestors2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wild populations of the world’s most common dabbling duck, the Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), run the risk of genetic introgression by farmed conspecifics released for hunting purposes. We tested whether bill morphology of free-living birds has changed since large-scale releases of farmed Mallards started. Three groups of Mallards from Sweden, Norway and Finland were compared: historical wild (before large-scale releases started), present-day wild, and present-day farmed. Higher density of bill lamellae was observed in historical wild Mallards (only males). Farmed Mallards had wider bills than present-day and historical wild ones. Present-day wild and farmed Mallards also had higher and shorter bills than historical wild Mallards. Present-day Mallards thus tend to have more ‘‘goose-like’’ bills (wider, higher, and shorter) than their ancestors. Our study suggests that surviving released Mallards affect morphological traits in wild population by introgression. We discuss how such anthropogenic impact may lead to a maladapted and genetically compromised wild Mallard population. Our study system has bearing on other taxa where large-scale releases of conspecifics with ‘alien genes’ may cause a cryptic invasive process that nevertheless has fitness consequences for individual birds.

  • 24.
    Söderquist, Pär
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Norrström, Joanna
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Wild mallards have more ‘‘goose-like’’ bills than their ancestors: a case of anthropogenic influence?2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 12, article id e115143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wild populations of the world’s most common dabbling duck, the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), run the risk of genetic introgression by farmed conspecifics released for hunting purposes. We tested whether bill morphology of free-living birds has changed since large-scale releases of farmed mallards started. Three groups of mallards from Sweden, Norway and Finland were compared: historical wild (before large-scale releases started), present-day wild, and present-day farmed. Higher density of bill lamellae was observed in historical wild mallards (only males). Farmed mallards had wider bills than present-day and historical wild ones. Present-day wild and farmed mallards also had higher and shorter bills than historical wild mallards. Present-day mallards thus tend to have more “goose-like” bills (wider, higher, and shorter) than their ancestors. Our study suggests that surviving released mallards affect morphological traits in wild population by introgression. We discuss how such anthropogenic impact may lead to a maladapted and genetically compromised wild mallard population. Our study system has bearing on other taxa where large-scale releases of conspecifics with ‘alien genes’ may cause a cryptic invasive process that nevertheless has fitness consequences for individual birds.

1 - 24 of 24
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