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  • 1.
    Bengtsson-Tops, Anita
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society. Lund University.
    Development and implementation of a need-based care model for persons who frequently visit psychiatric emergency rooms2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Lunds universitet.
    Emerging roles of nurses working at psychiatric emergency rooms (PER)2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Lund University.
    Frequent visitors at the psychiatric emergency room: a literature review2018In: Psychiatric quarterly, ISSN 0033-2720, E-ISSN 1573-6709, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 11-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Frequent visitors at the psychiatric emergency room (PER) constitute a small subgroup of patients, yet they are responsible for a disproportionate number of visits and thus claim considerable resources. Their needs are often left unmet and their repetitive visits reflect their dissatisfaction as well as that of PERs' staff. Motivated by these dilemmas, this study systematically reviews the literature about frequent visitors at PER and seeks to answer two questions: What characterizes frequent visitors at PER in the literature? and What characterizes PER in the literature? Based on 29 studies, this paper offers answers to the two questions based on a strength weakness opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis. The results of the review and subsequent analysis of the literature revealed the multiplicity and complexity of frequent visitors' characteristics and how they appear to converge. Commonalities were more difficult to identify in PER characteristics. In some cases, this happened because the characteristics were poorly described or were context specific. As a result, it was not easy to compare the studies on PER. Based on SWOT and the findings of the analysis, the paper proposes new venues of research and suggests how the field of mental health might develop by taking into account its opportunities and threats.

  • 4.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Lunds universitet.
    Persons who frequently visit the psychiatric emergency room: who are they and what are their needs?2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Persons who frequently visit psychiatric emergency rooms (PERs) account for a disproportionately high number of total visits to PERs. They have needs just as any other human beings do. Yet in addition, they also have specific daily function needs, service needs, and needs for professional healthcare.  The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate who persons frequently visiting PERs in Sweden are and what needs they have. Both studies I and II were conducted in southern Sweden. Study I is a quantitative mapping study describing who persons who frequently visit PERs are, what characterizes them, and what characterizes their visits, while study II investigates their self-expressed and selfassessed needs using a mixed-methods design.  For data collection, a large-scale registry was used in study I, while in study II an interviewer-administered manual was applied consisting of open-ended questions and validated instruments covering the person-in-care’s needs assessment, alcohol and drug use, exposure to violence, and social network. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests (I, II) and qualitative data were analysed using qualitative content analysis (II).  The results indicate that persons who frequently visit PERs represented 8.1% of the total number of PER visitors but accounted for 38.3% of the total number of PER visits (I). They differed significantly from the rest of the PER visitors in terms of gender, diagnoses, hospital admissions, and temporal patterns of visits. Differences were also found in the distance between the PERs and the home municipalities of the visitors (I). In addition, they reported problems in many need areas in life, involving physical and psychiatric health problems as well as financial, emotional, and social problems (II). Results also indicate that they are often subject to violence and have limited social networks (II).  The results may be used for planning, developing, and evaluating interventions targeting the needs of persons who frequently visit PERs, which is in line with a person-centred approach. Such an approach might eventually address their needs better, reduce their suffering, and consequently result in fewer PER visits.  

  • 5.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Predictors of self-rated health and lifestyle behaviours in Swedish university students2012In: Global Journal of Health Science, ISSN 1916-9736, Vol. 4, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lifestyle behaviours are usually formed during youth or young adulthood which makes college students a particularly vulnerable group that easily can adopt unhealthy lifestyle behaviour. Aim: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the influence of socio-demographic factors on Swedish university students’ lifestyle behaviours and self-rated health. Method: Data were collected from a convenience sample of 152 students using questionnaires consisting of a socio-demographic section followed by previously well-validated instruments. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics: t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression tests. Findings: The results of this study show that the lifestyle behaviours under study (physical activity, perceived stress and eating behaviours) as well as self-rated health can be predicted to a certain extent by socio-demographic factors such as gender, mother tongue and parents’ educational level. Male university students were shown to be physically more active than female students; the male students were less stressed and rated their overall health, fitness level and mental health higher. Female students were more prone to adopt unhealthy eating behaviours. Discussion: This study addresses gender differences and their influences on lifestyle behaviours; it provides both theoretical explanations for these differences as well as presents some practical implications of the findings.

  • 6.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Social marketing and breastfeeding: a literature review2013In: Global Journal of Health Science, ISSN 1916-9736, E-ISSN 1916-9744, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 82-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Through the review of relevant literature this study illuminates the concepts of social marketing and breastfeeding. It specifically discusses the positioning of the link between social marketing and breastfeeding within different fields of study and develops a theoretical framework that tries to bridge the gap between those disciplines.

    Method: Various electronic databases were used and through systematic selection 11 scientific articles were identified that this literature review is based on.

    Results: The review indicates that the relationship between social marketing and breastfeeding is complex. There are indications that this relationship is being investigated within three distinct fields of research: psychology/education, public health and marketing. Depending on the research field the emphasis is put on either breastfeeding or social marketing as well as on the other concepts that were discovered to be of importance within this relationship. Namely, group and individual demography as well as behaviour were revealed to be important elements of the link between social marketing and breastfeeding.

    Conclusions: Based on the results this study concludes that a more multidimensional view on the relationship between the concepts under study is needed since the focus of previous studies is very one-sided and limited to just one element when all elements should be integrated equally.

  • 7.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap. Lunds universitet.
    The well-being of doctoral students: a literature review2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society. Lund University.
    Ekstrand, Joakim
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Ekonomi och arbetsliv. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Bengtsson-Tops, Anita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Clinical profiles and temporal patterns of psychiatric emergency room visitors in Sweden2018In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 197-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To describe persons visiting the psychiatric emergency room (PER) in Sweden and to compare persons who frequently (PFV) and infrequently (PIFV) visit PERs in terms of group size, age, gender, PER location inside versus outside the home municipality, diagnosis (ICD 10), temporal patterns of visits and hospital admissions.

    METHODS: This register study included all visits to PERs in one Swedish county over 3 years, 2013-2015 (N = 67,031 visits). The study employed descriptive statistics as well as Chi-square tests combined with Bonferroni correction to compare PFV with PIFV.

    RESULTS: Of the total of 27,282 visitors, 2201 (8.1%) were identified as PFV (five or more visits within 12 months) and they accounted for 38.1% of the total visits. The study found differences between PFV and PIFV in gender, diagnostic profile, hospital admissions and temporal patterns. Differences were also detected with regard to distance between PERs and home municipalities. However, no age-related differences were found between the two groups.

    CONCLUSIONS: PFV and PIFV have different clinical profiles and temporal patterns. These results may be important when planning, developing and evaluating interventions targeting the needs of each group, which is in accordance with a person-centred approach. Such an approach might eventually result in fewer visits to PERs.

  • 9.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society. Lund University.
    Ekstrand, Joakim
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Avdelningen för ekonomi. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education.
    Bengtsson-Tops, Anita
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Self-reported needs for care, support and treatment of persons who frequently visit psychiatric emergency rooms in Sweden2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 9, p. 738-745Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate self-reported needs for care, support and treatment among persons who frequently visit psychiatric emergency rooms (PERs).

    DESIGN: A cross-sectional design. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected using an interview-based manual. Qualitative data were analysed using content analysis, whereas quantitative data were analysed using descriptive, non-parametric statistical tests.

    RESULTS: Persons who frequently visit PERs self-reported unmet needs for care, support and treatment in life domains such as health, socialisation, daytime activities, and emotional and financial security.

    CONCLUSION: To meet the needs of persons who frequently visit PERs, close cooperation between concerned welfare actors should be implemented.

  • 10.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap. Lund University.
    Hansson, Erika
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för psykologi.
    Doctoral students' well-being: a literature review2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Doctoral student well-being is an important matter that shapes the well-being of academics throughout their careers. Given that well-being has been found to be closely related to employee productivity and efficiency, strategies associated with maintaining well-being during PhD studies might be crucial for higher education, its outcomes and-just as importantly-for a balanced life of PhD students.  Method: Based on 17 studies, this literature review critically assesses the literature on doctoral student well-being.  Results: Theoretical models, concepts of well-being, and methods applied are discussed, as are the results of the articles. The reviewed studies are then discussed based on a SWOT analysis addressing the strengths and weaknesses of the reviewed research as well as the identified opportunities and threats, which can be used as a basis for future research. Based on the review findings and the SWOT analysis, a multidimensional view of the well-being of doctoral students is proposed.  Conclusions: The study proposes a more student-centred approach to meeting doctoral students' needs, and the enhancement of doctoral student well-being in order, as a long-term goal, to improve academics' well-being and productivity.Doctoral student well-being is an important matter that shapes the well-being of academics throughout their careers. Given that well-being has been found to be closely related to employee productivity and efficiency, strategies associated with maintaining well-being during PhD studies might be crucial for higher education, its outcomes and-just as importantly-for a balanced life of PhD students. Based on 17 studies, this literature review critically assesses the literature on doctoral student well-being. Theoretical models, concepts of well-being, and methods applied are discussed, as are the results of the articles. The reviewed studies are then discussed based on a SWOT analysis addressing the strengths and weaknesses of the reviewed research as well as the identified opportunities and threats, which can be used as a basis for future research. Based on the review findings and the SWOT analysis, a multidimensional view of the well-being of doctoral students is proposed. The study proposes a more student-centred approach to meeting doctoral students' needs, and the enhancement of doctoral student well-being in order, as a long-term goal, to improve academics' well-being and productivity.

  • 11.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Umans, Timurs
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Ekonomi. Kristianstad University, Plattformen för forskning om verksamhetsförlagd utbildning och professionslärande.
    Experiences of well-being among female doctoral students in Sweden2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, p. 23059-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore how female PhD students experience and perceive their well-being. Focus groups were conducted with female PhD students employed at a Swedish university. The study was performed using a phenomenological hermeneutic approach based on the concept of the lifeworld, used as both a philosophical perspective and a methodology. Three main themes emerged from the analysis: being true to oneself, being in the sphere of influence, and performing a balancing act. By unfolding these themes, the study shows that perceptions and experiences of well-being in female PhD students are a multifaceted phenomenon and materialize through interaction of different aspects of ‘‘self ’’ (agent) and ‘‘others’’ (structure). As well as illustrating these perceptions and experiences, the study also presents female PhD students’ conceptualization of their well-being, expressed in terms of a white-water rafting metaphor.

  • 12.
    Umans, Timurs
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Ekonomi. Kristianstad University, Plattformen för forskning om verksamhetsförlagd utbildning och professionslärande.
    Broberg, Pernilla
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Ekonomi. Kristianstad University, Plattformen för forskning om verksamhetsförlagd utbildning och professionslärande.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II.
    Nilsson, Sofie
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Olsson, Emma
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Feeling well by being together: study of Swedish auditors2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As guardians of the public interest, auditors represent a unique occupational group. The paper explores organizational culture as an antecedent of auditors’ well-being, which is assumed to have important consequences for the quality of auditors’ work.This study is based on a survey of 207 Swedish auditors. Using established and validated instruments measuring aspects of organizational culture and personal well-being, the study employed correlations and multiple regression analysis in testing the relationship between the two.The results of the study suggest that increasing the degree of collectivistic organizational culture has a positive effect on three aspects of well-being: job satisfaction, life balance and life satisfaction.This study is the first attempt to explore well-being of auditors and its antecedents represented by organizational culture. Contrary to the expectation that auditors take an individualistic approach to their work, this study establishes that auditors feel best in a work environment characterized by a collectivist organizational culture.

  • 13.
    Umans, Timurs
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Ekonomi. Kristianstad University, Plattformen för forskning om verksamhetsförlagd utbildning och professionslärande.
    Broberg, Pernilla
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Ekonomi. Kristianstad University, Plattformen för forskning om verksamhetsförlagd utbildning och professionslärande.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II.
    Nilsson, Sofie
    Kristianstad University.
    Olsson, Emma
    Kristianstad University.
    Feeling well by being together: study of Swedish auditors2016In: Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment & Rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 79-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As guardians of the public interest, auditors represent a unique occupational group. The group that has shown to experience high level of stress and overload often being associated with environmentally imposed responsibility as well as organizationally imposed performance demands. It is the later aspects, represented by the concept of organizational culture, that is being highlighted in this papers and its relationship to auditors well-beingOBJECTIVES:The paper aims to explore organizational culture as an antecedent of auditors' well-being, which is assumed to have important consequences for the quality of auditors' work.Methods: This study is based on a survey of 207 Swedish auditors. Using established and validated instruments measuring aspects of organizational culture and personal well-being, the study employed correlations and multiple regression analysis in testing the relationship between the two.Results: The results of the study suggest that increasing the degree of collectivistic organizational culture has a positive relationship with three aspects of well-being: Job satisfaction, life balance and life satisfaction.Conclusions: This study is the first attempt to explore well-being of auditors and its antecedents represented by organizational culture. Contrary to the expectation that auditors take an individualistic approach to their work, this study establishes that auditors feel best in a work environment characterized by a collectivist organizational culture.

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