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  • 1.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Abadyl of tunes: bring the noise2012In: 2012 International Conference on Cyberworlds (CW) / [ed] Arjan Kuijper, Alexei Sourin, 2012, p. 278-282Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, in a project still in the making, I will present how we developed a process for collectively producing the explorative soundscapes, using specific constraints of the Abadyl framework influenced by theories from art and architecture. I will show how we worked with a design methodology that brought together an editor and the final expression of the artwork into one surface of interaction and execution using a virtual cityscape as an iterative ground for sound and music explorations. I will also discuss how we tweaked/iterated with the parameters of the framework, the sounds and the final visual expression to match our artistic intention, and finally to bring some noise into Abadyl.

  • 2.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Bring the noise2013In: International Journal of Art, Culture and Design Technologies, ISSN 2155-4196, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 26-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article the author will present how they developed different processes for collectively producing a seriesexplorative soundscapes and mechanical artefacts using specific constraints influenced by theories from artand architecture. The author will show how they worked with a design methodology that brought togetheran editor and the final expression of the artwork into one surface of interaction and execution using a virtualcityscape as an iterative ground for sound and music explorations, and give some examples of the differentprototypes and iterations. The author will also discuss how they tweaked/iterated with the parameters of the framework, the sounds and the final visual expression to match their artistic intention, and finally to bringsome noise into Abadyl. Also influencing the overall framework.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Gestaltande examinationsformer2017In: Högskolepedagogisk debatt, ISSN 2000-9216, no 2, p. 45-53Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Ideal spaces exhibition2017In: ArtsIt2017, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Through the years we have worked with  the idea of gestalt through artefact creation (including virtual objects and 3D-worlds) as one surface to explore, exploit, test and communicate our ideas and concepts, that are generative rather than produced, where we try  to grasp systematic insights through complex generated realities, in which an audience later is invited to interact.  In our Ideal spaces exhibition for the 2016 Biennale in Venice, we tried to explore this via a combination of presenting ideal city spaces, active participation of the visitors molding their own spaces, and symbolic representation. Ideal Spaces is also a high-tech project that uses diverse technologies in new ways, also new techniques and programming developed by us. In this paper, we show the theoretical and cultural background, and some lessons learned, regarding on what level of abstraction a visitor could interact with our exhibition to better understand how visitors created their own ideal spaces.

  • 5.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Soundscaping2018In: Enhancing art, culture, and design with technological integration / [ed] Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, Hershey, Pennsylvania 17033-1240, USA: IGI Global , 2018, p. 169-182Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, the author presents how he developed different processes for collectively producing a series explorative soundscapes through interface creation and mechanical artifacts using specific constraints influenced by theories of art, design, and architecture. He shows how he worked with a design methodology that brought together an editor and the final expression of the artwork into one surface of interaction and execution using a virtual cityscape as an iterative ground for sound and music explorations, and gives some examples of different prototypes and iterations. The author also discusses how he tweaked/iterated with the parameters of the framework, the sounds, and the final visual expression to match his artistic intention, and finally to bring some noise.

  • 6.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    The eight continent: design for an intentional surprise2013In: Proceedings: 2013 International Conference on Cyberworlds / [ed] Xiaoyang Mao, Lichan Hong, Los Alamitos: IEEE Computer Society, 2013, p. 232-239Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I will present and discuss the design thinking, methods, processes and some examples of work, that demonstrates how I together with different co-creators set up a work practice, using digital 3d objects and images. That in different ways and formats helps us to explore how a database, a set of rules can be used in a dialogue with artistic work practice and how such a process can be used to create images and animation in a variety of design and art projects. The main example is a project called Conversation China that still is in its making, here we work with rather complex processes, involving several digital analogue techniques as the basis for creating the images for a 150 pieces porcelain dinner set. My interest in this work is how the intention of the artist or designer is transferred and later embedded in the procedural or algorithmic process and how this intent is organized and set up to secure an desired outcome, mixing the possibilities of the digital media object with manual editing and artistic craftsmanship. With the idea of design fiction, we continue to ask and explore how intent can be critical to the design process as well as the final result, that is rendered between the procedural techniques and the artistic intention. What this paper tries to put forward is how we designed and set up environments for working with non linear and procedural media, their different expressions and forms by using explorable prototypes and design thinking?

  • 7.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    The people´s smart sculpture PS22016In: ISEA 2016: Journey to Abadyl / [ed] Martin Koplin, 2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The People’s Smart Sculpture (PS2) panel discusses future oriented approaches in smart media-art, developed, designed and exploited for artistic and public participation in the change and re-design of our living environment. The actual debate about a smart future is not taking into account any idea of media art as an instrument for to realize the social sculpture, mentioned by Beuys[1] or as social sculpture itself.

    The People’s Smart Sculpture is the only large scale Creative Europe media-art project (2014-2018) in this context. It fosters participative-art and collaborative media-art-processes. The artistic results and the open approaches of the project will be discussed by 5 panelists from 5 countries. The project itself is constituted by 12 project-partners in 8 European countries with more than 350 artists and creatives from 29 countries worlwide. The approach works on two levels: the implementation of cultural participation-projects by media-artists and the ongoing optimization of the art and participation aspects. PS2 integrates diverse groups of people to participate in the non-institutional set up of structures for the people´s re-design of their urban, societal and living environment. Artists, citizens, creatives with a new user's perception and new skills are able to „medialize“ the Cultural R>evolution of art, culture, society and science: into spaces of a new public.

  • 8.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Wanderlost2014In: Cyberworlds (CW), 2014 International Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I will discuss a art and design project called wander lost, were we through co-creation try to populate a virtual world with people, objects and architecture. In this project we have developed a method for gathering input and inspiration for early stages in the design process designing virtual worlds. I will through some example of work show how worlds, real and virtual are as much made as found, and how they can be used to challenged each other into new forms of experiences and expressions, of both physical and virtual spaces. Where the virtual space transformed into maps & instructions can challenge the physical with qualities that is very hard to achieve in the physical world itself, and in that conflict new insights and expressions can revealed. Today Hybrid creations have become a method for working with cultural production not only with different elements of form, but as blending identities of the creators as well, wander lost support that process. We show how we from the virtual settings of the city of Traora we have extracted a series of walks as instructions and invited different co-creators to explore these algorithmical walks in their everyday surrounding in order to be surprised by rediscovery, using a digital camera/smart phone to capture and later communicate their findings. Allowing the unfamiliar to co-exist with the comfortably familiar. To create a process where digital worlds challenge and inspire digital expressions, tools and models with physical play and exploration. Supporting our long-term aim with research in new media is to set up design methods that can be used in a creative and collaborative process. We show how these findings played a crucial role designing the virtual city Traora. The Traora Flaneur kit turns everyday walks into discoveries of both urban contexts as well as ideas for possible virtual worlds.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Wanderlost2015In: Analyzing art, culture, and design in the digital age / [ed] Gianluca Mura, Hershey, Pensylvania: IGI Global, 2015, p. 71-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter I will discuss a art and design project called wanderlost, were we through co-creation try to populate a virtual world with people, objects and architecture. In this project stages we have developed a method for gathering input and inspiration for early stages in the design process designing virtual worlds. I will through some example of work show how worlds, real and virtual are as much made as found, and how they can be used to challenged each other into new forms of experiences and expressions, of both physical and virtual spaces. Where the virtual space transformed into maps & instructions can challenge the physical with qualities that is very hard to achieve in the physical world itself, and in that conflict new insights and expressions can revealed. Today Hybrid creations have become a method for working with cultural production not only with different elements of form, but as blending identities of the creators as well, wanderlost support that process. We show how we from the virtual settings of the city of Traora we have extracted a series of walks as instructions and invited different co-creators to explore these algorithmical walks in their everyday surrounding in order to be surprised by rediscovery, using a digital camera/smartphone to capture and later communicate their findings. Allowing the unfamiliar to co-exist with the comfortably familiar. To create a process where digital worlds challenge and inspire digital expressions, tools and models with physical play and exploration. Supporting our long-term aim with research in new media is to set up design methods that can be used in a creative and collaborative process. We show how these findings played a crucial role designing the virtual city Traora. The wanderlost method turns everyday walks into discoveries of both urban contexts as well as ideas for possible virtual worlds.

  • 10.
    Johansson, Michael
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Gehmann, Ulrich
    Tyskland.
    Ideal spaces: digital-cultural ecology and the medium-sized city2016In: Digital-cultural ecology and the medium-sized city / [ed] S. Sparke & G. Cairns, 2016, p. 5-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our working group Ideal Spaces we are concerned with mediated worlds: especially the one of ideal worlds reconstructed, mainly concentrating on a classical topic of a “mediated” city through history, namely that of a utopian ideal city. How these utopian places have to be conceived as being ‘ideal’ ones. How this has been mediated, in terms of their modes of presentation, but also in those of the ideas underlying them as regards the different audiences that were thought to be addressed by them?

    These historical conceptions of what an ‘ideal world’ should, or could be is a classical topic of our cultural sphere, and focuses upon one perspective of relevance, that of an ideal city. The latest since the onset of what has been called ‘modernity’, now providing the actual background of the actually built cities we all live in, as our environment of relevance.

    Such conceptions of ‘ideal’ relevant worlds can be compared, as a background folio, with the approaches towards an ‘ideal’ environment as they become evident in the concept of The City of Abadyl. That in itself is a proposed city, a fantasy, a set of codes and models, a library of artefacts and prototypes, and foremost, it is its co-creators. Since its inception in 1999 it has grown into a large database of materials interlinked through the shape of a city, regardless of their respective incompatibilities. Support and create a geatlt for inquary

    Our approach is to create an environment which facilitates artistic work practice in complex production environments such as those of digital media, supporting invited artists, researchers, companies, and students. We establish a ready-made, fictitious gravity that others can easily transfer their knowledge into. So How do we go about exploring this complex digital space? We could let people walk the streets of Abadyl in for example a game engine, but we have so far chosen to go in another direction. We have used the framework of Abadyl to stage different events in the form of written scenarios that provide detailed and specific background material. Our scenarios try to bring aspects of field study and fantasy together, to slowly create a discrete dynamic tension or displacement between persons, objects, time, places, and events that are not usually, if ever, associated into new and surprising conjunctions. Through this work we have developed several methods of worldmaking. The aspect of imagery is of particular importance here since comparisons can be made between traditional conceptions of pre-planned ideal worlds – e.g., the ideal of a functionalist city, of a typically ‘modern’ one, etc. – and imageries that evolve de novo and unplanned, as it is tried in the case of Abadyl.

    Moreover, such comparisons inform about a further aspect of imagery and hence, of being mediated. We have to take the notion of the ideal in both its connotations as a mental or inner image on the one hand (from the Greek eidos, or idea); and on the other, as a perfect state to be achieved and longed for (the ideal in its common terms of understanding). If we do so, then it becomes evident that even seemingly ‘new’ and ‘spontaneous’ outcomes like those in Abadyl are informed by mental or ‘inner’ images deeply rooted in what is called a cultural memory, that is, rest on a culture-specific substratum. And it is very interesting to see how these both layers of imagery, the “new” and the “old” one, are influencing each other in mutual terms. Which is a very important topic of mediated cities today since the assumption is that what is happening in Abadyl is also happening here.

  • 11.
    Johansson, Michael
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Gehmann, Ulrich
    Tyskland.
    Reiche, Martin
    Tyskland.
    Gestalt2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many disciplines have the culture and nurturing to explore, create, and tell stories about worlds. Therefore, our contribution is about the re-discovery of an idea that has been crucial in occidental thinking and which became underestimated: the notion of gestalt. To conceive real-world (and other) phenomena in terms of gestalt helps to gain a holistic understanding of them, and the aim of our paper therefore is to promote a method to rediscover the world in a less analytical fashion than it has been done in the last 400 years, after an analytical-based perception of reality gained ground with the scientific method developed in the 17th century and later. At the same time, a gestalt-approach helps to reframe (and better understand) recent technological developments as outcomes of an analytical way of thinking. Because analysis and the shaping of processes and entities according to functionalities is not the only or most suitable way to generate understanding, despite we got used to such a general state of mind.

    To conceive the world primarily in analytical terms or as a set of functions became culturally accepted. A gestalt-approach can be a promising complement to the prevalent analytical approaches, and the general benefit of such an approach lies in the use of comparative methods to create knowledge or design processes. Also borrowing ideas from Design Theory where Gestalt is analogous to a design process, we can view it as a process of knowledge acquisition and learning from the previously unknown.

    Gestalt perception as well as -conception helps to develop another kind of epistemology than the prevalent analytical/functional one, as for instance cybernetics, system theories and bioengineering already demonstrated. It transcends the border between real and virtual towards envisioning a complete reality, and out of that proves to be a method of working with unknown phenomena.

  • 12.
    Johansson, Michael
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Hall, Jim
    Happylander Ltd.
    Salo, Johan
    Do-Fi.
    Abadyl of tunes2011In: Ambience '11 exhibition: ... where art, technology and design meet / [ed] Annika Hellström, Hanna Landin, Linda Worbin, Borås: University of Borås , 2011, p. 40-43Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Johansson, Michael
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Wetterstrand, Martin
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Lundstedt, Rikard
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    E-participation – engaged participation2011In: Proceedings of ISEA2011 Istanbul, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Johansson, Michael
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Åberg, Kristoffer
    Against the self-evident2014In: Real virtuality: about deconstruction and multiplication of world / [ed] Ulrich Gehmann, Martin Rieche, Berlin: Transcript Verlag, 2014, p. 419-441Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Koplin, M.
    et al.
    Tyskland.
    Vistica, O.
    Kroatien..
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Nedelkovski, I.
    Makedonien.
    Salo, K.
    Finland.
    Eirund, H.
    Tyskland.
    Schrank, C.
    Tyskland.
    Blau, L.
    Tyskland.
    SOCIAL ART IN EUROPEAN SPACES - AN APPROACH TO PARTICIPATION METHODOLOGIES WITHIN PS22016In: INTED 2016: 10TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, 2016, p. 1690-1699Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The People's Smart Sculpture PS2 - Social Art in European Spaces is a creative research and innovation project about the cultural evolution of the European city of the future. It addresses the growing complexity of life in today's city spaces and imminent challenges to the development of the urban environment. The People's Smart Sculpture PS2 explores the possibilities of participation that will become a smart culture technique as a result of the ongoing digitalization of society. 12 partners including universities, educational institutions, museums, galleries, theatres and research institutes in 8 European countries will organize 11 connected open labs integrating new art, design thinking, science, smart technologies and user culture for the participatory re-design of urbanity. The project has a budget of 2 million Euros and is funded by the European Commission within the Creative Europe programme for 3.5 years. 11 creative experiments in participatory art and design for the city of the future: The 12 project partners implement 11 experimental sub-projects and a European study about new forms of participation. While some PS2 sub-projects shed light on the ways we perceive our city space, or create speculative city environments, others will analyse problems, identify challenges and explore interdisciplinary solutions with citizens. The variety of approaches will reflect the diversity of people, skills, urban art, social processes and urban development. Renowned artists and designers from 29 countries will participate in the sub-projects. PS2 will explore and document new strategies for involving digital media and ICT in the development of user-centred culture. Development of new forms of participation for Smart Cities: Scientists from media-labs, computer science, cultural science, art history, sociology, architecture, design and urban planning will engage with the creative processes. Digital technologies will not only play an important role in the PS2 project art activities themselves, but directly support the innovation process by offering new opportunities for empowerment and societal integration of people of all social groups. The project will connect people and foster the exchange of ideas about and for smart cities. It is the base for cutting-edge communication between science and art, creatives, artists, media designers and citizens, and between the people and their governments. At the same time it will motivate the broad dissemination of new skills, design expertise and social knowledge relevant to urban re-design. Citizen participation in urban development and re-design has a long cultural tradition in Europe. But the rising complexity out of social issues, critical and creative ideas, green development, and at the same time a high level of demands towards a post-modernistic cultural evolution evoke the need of improved cooperation between all stakeholders in town: governmental entities, creative, and social cultural activists, experts and citizens. The participation processes needed for future activities in the field of urban-social sustainability requires an enhanced approach to citizen participation and user-friendly creative articulation. It is required to access the full potential of the new capabilities of communication, networking, social media, creativity, microcomputers, and new e-skills through the design of new participation methodologies. Art and media art prototype the next step concepts and methodologies for participation. This paper describes concepts and approaches of participation and reflects on participative art within examples of 6 PS2 sub-projects.

  • 16. Koplin, Martin
    et al.
    Siegert, Stephan
    Eirund, Helmut
    Ruzin, Irena
    Nedelkovski, Igor
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Avdelningen för design.
    Callesen, Jörgen
    Geiger, Christian
    Culén, Alma Leora
    Coughlin, Katie
    Wroblewska, Marta
    Salo, Kari
    Druzetic, Ivana
    The people's smart sculpture PS2: best practice study 2014-20182018Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Lennernäs, Maria
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Nyberg, Maria
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Wetterstrand, Martin
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Meals and shift work: food choice, time of day and meal environment - three important dimensions for rest and health2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Siess, Andreas
    et al.
    Tyskland.
    Hepperle, Daniel
    Tyskland.
    Wölfel, Matthias
    Tyskland.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Avdelningen för design.
    Worldmaking: designing for audience participation, immersion and interaction in virtual and real spaces2018In: Interactivity, game creation, design, learning, and innovation / [ed] Anthony L. Brooks & Eva Brooks & Cristina Sylla, Cham: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Soneson, Thore
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Avdelningen för design.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Avdelningen för design.
    ‘Wanderlost’: a participatory art and design endeavor2018In: Mediterranean cities and island communities: smart, sustainable, inclusive and resilient / [ed] Anastasia Stratigea & Dimitris Kavroudakis, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 135-160Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wanderlost’ addresses the growing complexity of life in today’s city spaces and the imminent challenges to the development of the urban environment. It delineates experiences gained from a project’s work, which incorporated workshops, artists’ collaborations, interactive participatory setups in public, theatre and performance spaces. It is a result of two public workshops in the end of the four-year-long period in the People Smart Sculpture (PS2) framework in the cities of Kristianstad and Copenhagen, with public events in April/May 2017 and October 2017. In this article we discuss how the project was prepared, set-up and implemented. We call this storyworld ‘Wanderlost’, developed from the project CubeX “The Journey to Abadyl”. We describe this work in the sections Collaboration, Research and Methods to show how we draw knowledge, methods and research from our work in the collaborative network PRAMnet in developing participatory concepts using a virtual city, the city of Abadyl as a backdrop. We put forward our models for engaging participation in a storyworld to imagine the world and our relations anew. We conclude that the ‘Wanderlost’ concept and project can be reused and re-situated in other contexts and environments; keeping the fundamental three formats with a digitally mediated tool, physical guides and explorative walks and a map of amusing and provoking artworks as a matrix.

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