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  • 1.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Childhood collecting in nature: quality experience in important places2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is growing concern for both the decline of direct experience people have with nature, and the quality of that experience. This diminished experience has negative consequences for public awareness and concern for biodiversity and ecosystem health (Miller, 2005). At the same time, a diminished experience of nature appears to have a substantial negative impact on child development (Kahn & Friedman, 1995; Kahn, 2002; Matteo, Barthel, & Lars, 2014; Pyle, 1993; Thomashow, 2002). These concerns are heightened in the urban context where increased urbanization shows a relationship with a reduction in biodiversity and ecosystem health (MA, 2005; Sala et al., 2000). Additional concern comes from studies showing decreasing ecological knowledge among growing urban populations (McDaniel & Alley, 2005; McKinney, 2002). In an attempt to address these concerns and contribute toward a better understanding of the importance of childhood experience of nature, this study investigates one specific example, collecting in nature. Studies show that childhood collecting in nature (the gathering of rocks, shells, feathers, etc. as part of play and free exploration) is a widespread phenomenon (Lekies & Beery, 2013), and yet, very little is understood about this behavior. This study explored the details of childhood collecting in nature with an emphasis on the places of this experience. Participants consisted of a random sample of undergraduate students at a Swedish university (N = 380) participating in a survey focused upon early life outdoor experiences. Responses included multiple choice and Likert scale items, along with data from open-ended questions. In addition, participants were invited to discuss their experience of childhood collecting in greater detail via a semi-structured interview. Fourteen interviews were conducted as follow-up to the survey. Data review considered descriptive statistics, correlations, and regression analysis triangulated with the qualitative data from the open-ended responses and interviews. Results highlight the importance of specific places in the childhood experience of nature, the importance of nearby nature, and further, provide preliminary support for a model for environmental concern (Wolf-Watz, 2015). Ultimately, the study illuminates the idea of childhood development as a cultural ecosystem service and provides implications for nature-based solutions, such as green infrastructure, to support childhood nature experience.

  • 2.
    Beery, Thomas
    University of Minnesota Duluth , Duluth , MN , USA.
    Establishing reliability and construct validity for an instrument to measure environmental connectedness2013In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 81-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this preliminary study is to establish a reliable and valid measure of environmental connectedness (EC) to allow for further exploration of the Swedish Outdoor Recreation in Change national survey data. The Nordic concept of friluftsliv (nature-based outdoor recreation) and the environmental psychology concept of EC are explored to provide a foundation for the research. Reliability and construct validity testing on items from the Outdoor Recreation in Change survey have been tested and have demonstrated both reliability and construct validity. A reliable and construct valid measure of EC will facilitate research into the possible relationships between EC, nature-based outdoor recreation, and environmental behavior. A better understanding of these relationships may serve to further understanding of the human relationship with nature.

  • 3.
    Beery, Thomas
    USA.
    Making sustainable behaviors the norm at the University of Minnesota Duluth2013In: Journal of Sustainability Education, ISSN 2151-7452, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interviews with undergraduate students were conducted as part of a follow-up to a survey soliciting information about student engagement in sustainability at a small upper Great Lakes public university. The environmental psychology theoretical foundation for the study presented the potential interdependent role of social and physical conditions to support environmental behavior change. Twelve undergraduate students were interviewed with a goal of gaining additional insight into daily student engagement in sustainability. Hycner’s (1985) guidelines were used for the phenomenological analysis of the interview data. Data were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. The key finding was an affirmation of the idea that we must identify and eliminate barriers in order to support an increase in daily student participation in sustainability. Participants noted convenience as a key factor to consider. Numerous references to “back home” remind us that we need to make our campus function more like a community with systems that support engagement. Reflective analysis of all of the findings leads to a discussion of how this particular university can achieve the intent of its core value of sustainability. It is proposed that this university put more energy into changing norms than changing attitudes. Heberlein’s (2012) behavior change guidelines are used to provide a strategy for addressing behavior change via an emphasis on normative behavior. Facilitating sustainability actions as normative behavior may be an effective first step in long-term attitudinal change.

  • 4.
    Beery, Thomas
    University of Minnesota.
    Nordic in nature: friluftsliv and environmental connectedness2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the question of whether a relationship exists between the Nordic cultural idea of friluftsliv and the psychological construct of environmental connectedness. This quantitative study employed a correlational design with existing data from the Swedish Outdoor Recreation in Change national survey. Results indicate that there is a significant and meaningful relationship between nature-based outdoor recreation participation and environmental connectedness even when controlling for other predictor variables. In addition, research findings indicate that age group moderates this relationship with one group exception. It was also found that activity participation by respondents shows a correlation with both environmental connectedness and age group. Implications of this study support a cultural understanding of nature-based outdoor recreation and an awareness of the important role of access to nature as an essential component of nature-based outdoor recreation. Age group differences supported a variety of implications and recommendations for future research. A consideration of how the results may have implications for environmental education and sustainability efforts in Sweden and the U.S. was explored. 

  • 5.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, MN, USA.
    Nordic In Nature: Friluftsliv and Environmental Connectedness2013In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 94-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the question of whether a relationship exists between the Nordic cultural idea of friluftsliv and the psychological construct of environmental connectedness (EC). This quantitative study employed a correlational design with existing data from the Swedish Outdoor Recreation in Change national survey. Results indicate that there is a significant and meaningful relationship between friluftsliv, operationally defined as nature-based outdoor recreation participation, and EC even when controlling for other predictor variables. In addition, research findings indicate that age group moderates this relationship with one group exception. It was also found that activity participation by respondents shows a correlation with both EC and age group. Implications of this study support a cultural understanding of nature-based outdoor recreation and an awareness of the important role of access to nature as an essential component of nature-based outdoor recreation. Age group differences supported a variety of implications and recommendations for future research. A consideration of how the results may have implications for environmental education and sustainability efforts were explored.

  • 6.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    People in nature: relational discourse for outdoor educators2014In: Research in Outdoor Education, ISSN 2375-6381, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Outdoor educators are concerned about a perceived human disconnection from nature. There is awareness of a lack of human affiliation, connection, or identity with nonhuman nature and its impact on attitudes and behaviors. This essay raises the possibility that despite our concern, we may contribute toward this disconnection via language that supports a separation of the natural and the cultural. Our ability to separate ourselves conceptually from the rest of nature may be partially to blame for environmental degradation, therefore challenging the nature-culture dichotomy is both useful and constructive. This essay will present examples of how outdoor educators can attempt to get past this problematic dichotomy and motivate more relational discourse within the practice of outdoor education.

  • 7.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Urban Nature Needs: Does the Path Through a Nature Center Lead Out the Door?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Jorgensen, Kari Anne
    Norge.
    Children in nature: sensory engagement and the experience of biodiversity2018In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 13-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given concerns for a severely diminished childhood experience of nature, coupled with alarm for a rapidly diminishing global biodiversity, this article considers the potential for childhood nature experience to be an important part of biodiversity understanding. Findings from two studies are integrated and presented as windows into childhood nature experience to illuminate important aspects of sensory rich learning. In one study from Sweden, semi-structured interviews with adults were conducted and analyzed to explore an understanding of the sensory experience of childhood collecting in nature via participant memories. In the second study, direct observations of children's play and exploration in an outdoor kindergarten in Norway were conducted and analyzed. Bringing these two studies together for shared analysis is useful for investigating biodiversity experience and understanding. Analysis supports the idea that the experience of biodiversity, actual childhood interaction with variation and diversity with living and nonliving items from nature allows children important learning opportunities, inclusive of biodiversity understanding. The results support practical implications for sensory rich environmental education and underscores the practical importance of childhood access to nature.

  • 9.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Outdoor recreation and place attachment: exploring the potential of outdoor recreation within a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve2017In: Journal of Outdoor Recreation, ISSN 2213-0780, E-ISSN 2213-0799, Vol. 17, p. 54-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates outdoor recreation participation within a multifunctional landscape, a UNESCO Man and Biosphere Reserve. The reserve, the Kristianstad Vattenrike located in southern Sweden, has made a deliberate effort to make the experience of biodiversity possible for residents and visitors. Recreation is a keypart of the biodiversity conservation effort in the area, represented by the infrastructure of the Kristianstad Vattenrike's 21 visitor sites. Given the biosphere reserve context, this study investigates the question of whether there is a relationship between outdoor recreation participation and place attachment. Survey data was collected using concurrent application of multiple sampling strategies including both probability and purposive sampling of local adult residents of the biosphere area. Quantitative analysis showed a significant positive relationship between the level of outdoor recreation participation and place attachment. Qualitative data supported this relationship with more details about place attachment within the studied area. The study confirms a relationship between place attachment and outdoor recreation and provides insight into how the biosphere reserve context supports this relationship. The results of this study show that significant biodiversity management in close conjunction with outdoor recreational opportunity can be achieved and provides opportunities for human engagement and experience of biodiversity.

    Management Implications: This research can help managers design recreational settings that support biodiversity conservation goals. Our research found that:

    • A leading motivation for outdoor recreation participation is nature experience and this motivation can be used by managers to highlight a biodiversity conservation interpretive message in the design of outdoor recreation infrastructure.

    • Providing proximate access to nature based outdoor recreation, to support deliberate and direct experience of biodiversity, is an important component of engaging the public in biodiversity conservation.

    • Recreation proximity alone will not create public engagement in biodiversity conservation. However,proximity as a part of a deliberate institutional design including biodiversity conservation, sustainable development, and logistic support for research and monitoring may be critical for public engagement.

  • 10.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. USA.
    Lekies, Kristi S.
    USA.
    Childhood collecting in nature: quality experience in important places2018In: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A need for a more specific understanding of childhood geographies has motivated an investigation of one activity, childhood collecting in nature. This study examined collecting behavior, places of collecting, and the relationship of these places to environmental connectedness in adulthood. Topophilia is presented as a guide to help consider why children collect in nature and to expand upon a limited understanding of collecting behavior. These ideas are explored with a mixed-method design strategy involving surveys and semi-structured interviews with a sample of Swedish university students. Results show collecting in nature to be a widespread, meaningful, and memorable experience in the formative years of participants. Results also demonstrate potential support for topophilia as a way to understand the childhood collecting nature phenomenon. Implications include recognition of the importance of family to support children’s engagement in the natural world and proximate access to nature as a critical aspect of childhood experience.

  • 11.
    Beery, Thomas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Jönsson, Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Upplevelsen av biologisk mångfald2015In: Vattenriket i Fokus, ISSN 1653-9338, Vol. 2015, no 4, p. 39-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    It is important to do something outside, not only inside this building...if you are outside the nature is talking to you. (Arabic/English speaking visitor)

    Concern for a diminished nature experience has been referred to as an extinction of experience (Pyle, 1993). The concern is based on the fear that diminished experience of nature leads to reduced environmental awareness and knowledge, and ultimately, to a reduction in pro-environmental behavior. Attention to both the value and potential loss of nature experience is at the foundation of the research presented here.

     

    Two related studies are briefly presented that explore the experience of nature, and specifically, the experience of biodiversity in the Kristianstad Vattenrike biosphere reserve. The first is a study of the relationship between place attachment and participation in nature based outdoor recreation. Random and targeted field based surveys with residents of the Kristianstad municipality were used to gather information. Results indicated a positive and significant relationship between measures of place attachment and nature-based outdoor recreation. The second study, an investigation of the Swedish EPA mandated goal that Swedish Nature Centers (Naturum) will inspire or motivate a direct experience of nature was conducted using thought listing methods. The results of these interviews indicated that the nature center in the Kristianstad Vattenrike is serving this noted function. An outcome that links both studies are the results that highlight the importance of proximate access (in regard to residence and transportation) of recreation and outdoor opportunity to facilitate direct experiences of nature.

  • 12.
    Beery, Thomas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Betydelsen av att uppleva biologisk mångfald2015In: Biodiverse, ISSN 1401-5064, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Beery, Thomas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Inspiring the outdoor experience: does the path through a nature center lead out the door?2015In: Journal of Interpretation Research, ISSN 1092-5872, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 67-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the visitor experience at a Swedish nature center within aUNESCO biosphere reserve. The question of whether this interpretive facility succeedsin motivating the visitor to get outdoors for a direct experience of nature is explored. Useof the environmental connectedness perspective and concerns about diminished natureexperience support the importance of this study. A number of qualitative methodologiesare used to investigate the research questions, including thought listing, phenomenology,and field observation. Results indicate that this particular nature center generallysucceeded in the goal of inspiring visitors for a direct nature experience. The success inmotivating visitors appears to be a result of a number of key variables, including placebasedexhibitry, access, and personal visitor factors. Given the setting for this study, weconclude that interpretive nature centers have the potential to play an important role inthe re-imagination of urban environments.

  • 14.
    Beery, Thomas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Topophilia and human affiliation with nature2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of this study is to explore the co-evolutionary foundation for place-based human affiliation with nonhuman nature, and its potential to support sustainable development at the local level. In particular, we analyse the Topophilia Hypothesis, an expansion of the Biophilia Hypothesis which includes also non-living elements in the environment.

    Methods: The study represents a multidisciplinary conceptual analysis of how biological selection and cultural learning may have interacted during human evolution to promote adaptive mechanisms for human affiliation with nonhuman nature via specific place attachment. 

    Results and Conclusions: The Biophilia Hypothesis has been one of the most important theories of human connectedness with nature, suggesting a genetically based inclination for human affiliation with the biological world. The Topophilia Hypothesis has extended the ideas of Biophilia to incorporate a broader conception of nonhuman nature and a co-evolutionary theory of genetic response and cultural learning. It also puts more emphasis on affiliation processes with the local environment. We propose that nurturing potential topophilic tendencies may be a useful method to promote sustainable development at the local level, and ultimately at the global level. Tendencies of local affiliation may also have implications for multifunctional landscape management, an important area within sustainability research, and we provide some examples of successful landscape management with a strong component of local engagement. Since human affiliation with nonhuman nature is considered an important dimension of environmental concern and support for pro-environmental attitudes, the Topophilia Hypothesis may provide a fruitful ground for a discourse within which scholars from many scientific fields, including human evolution and humanistic geography, can participate.

     

  • 15.
    Beery, Thomas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    From environmental connectedness to sustainable futures: topophilia and human affiliation with nature2015In: European Human Behaviour and Evolution Association Annual Conference, University of Helsinki, March 29-April 1, 2015, 2015, p. 57-58Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to explore the co-evolutionary foundation for place-based human affiliation with nonhuman nature, and its potential to support sustainable development at the local level. In particular, we analyse the Topophilia Hypothesis, an expansion of the Biophilia Hypothesis which includes also non-living elements in the environment. Methods: The study represents a multidisciplinary conceptual analysis of how biological selection and cultural learning may have interacted during human evolution to promote adaptive mechanisms for human affiliation with nonhuman nature via specific place attachment. Results and Conclusions: The Biophilia Hypothesis has been one of the most important theories of human connectedness with nature, suggesting a genetically based inclination for human affiliation with the biological world. The Topophilia Hypothesis has extended the ideas of Biophilia to incorporate a broader conception of nonhuman nature and a co-evolutionary theory of genetic response and cultural learning. It also puts more emphasis on affiliation processes with the local environment. We propose that nurturing potential topophilic tendencies may be a useful method to promote sustainable development at the local level, and ultimately at the global level. Tendencies of local affiliation may also have implications for multifunctional landscape management, an important area within sustainability research, and we provide some examples of successful landscape management with a strong component of local engagement. Since human affiliation with nonhuman nature is considered an important dimension of environmental concern and support for pro-environmental attitudes, the Topophilia Hypothesis may provide a fruitful ground for a discourse within which scholars from many scientific fields, including human evolution and humanistic geography, can participate.

  • 16.
    Beery, Thomas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    From environmental connectedness to sustainable futures: topophilia and human affiliation with nature2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 8837-8854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human affiliation with nonhuman nature is an important dimension of environmental concern and support for pro-environmental attitudes. A significant theory of human connectedness with nature, the Biophilia Hypothesis, suggests that there exists a genetically based inclination for human affiliation with the biological world. Both support and challenge to the Biophilia Hypothesis are abundant in the literature of environmental psychology. One response that both challenges and builds upon the Biophilia Hypothesis is the Topophilia Hypothesis. The Topophilia Hypothesis has extended the ideas of biophilia to incorporate a broader conception of nonhuman nature and a co-evolutionary theory of genetic response and cultural learning. While the Topophilia Hypothesis is a new idea, it is built upon long-standing scholarship from humanistic geography and theories in human evolution. The Topophilia Hypothesis expands previous theory and provides a multidisciplinary consideration of how biological selection and cultural learning may have interacted during human evolution to promote adaptive mechanisms for human affiliation with nonhuman nature via specific place attachment. Support for this possible co-evolutionary foundation for place-based human affiliation with nonhuman nature is explored from multiple vantage points. We raise the question of whether this affiliation may have implications for multifunctional landscape management. Ultimately, we propose that nurturing potential topophilic tendencies may be a useful method to promote sustainable efforts at the local level with implications for the global.

  • 17.
    Beery, Thomas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Raymond, Christopher M
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Kyttä, Marketta
    Finland.
    Olafsson, Anton Stahl
    Danmark.
    Plieninger, Tobias
    Danmark.
    Sandberg, Mattias
    Gothenburg University.
    Stenseke, Marie
    Gothenburg University.
    Tengö, Maria
    Stockholm Resilience Center.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Fostering incidental experiences of nature through green infrastructure planning2017In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 717-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concern for a diminished human experience of nature and subsequent decreased human well-being is addressed via a consideration of green infrastructure's potential to facilitate unplanned or incidental nature experience. Incidental nature experience is conceptualized and illustrated in order to consider this seldom addressed aspect of human interaction with nature in green infrastructure planning. Special attention has been paid to the ability of incidental nature experience to redirect attention from a primary activity toward an unplanned focus (in this case, nature phenomena). The value of such experience for human well-being is considered. The role of green infrastructure to provide the opportunity for incidental nature experience may serve as a nudge or guide toward meaningful interaction. These ideas are explored using examples of green infrastructure design in two Nordic municipalities: Kristianstad, Sweden, and Copenhagen, Denmark. The outcome of the case study analysis coupled with the review of literature is a set of sample recommendations for how green infrastructure can be designed to support a range of incidental nature experiences with the potential to support human well-being.

  • 18.
    Beery, Thomas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Stålhammar, Sanna
    Lund University.
    Jönsson, Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Wamsler, Christine
    Lund University.
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Lund University.
    Brink, Ebba
    Lund University.
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö University.
    Johansson, Michael
    Lund University.
    Palo, Thomas
    SLU.
    Schubert, Per
    Malmö University.
    Perceptions of the ecosystem services concept: opportunities and challenges in the Swedish municipal context2016In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 17, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A current focus of ecosystem services (ES) implementation is on the municipal level of government where international and national legislation and policies have to be translated into practice. Given this focus, an understanding of perceptions within municipalities of the ES concept is crucial to support the implementation process. Against this background, this paper examines the perceptions of Swedish municipal stakeholders for the ES concept. A 2013 Swedish federal mandate that states that the values of ecosystem services should be considered in relevant decision-making processes, provides a timely context. Current perceptions, preconditions and awareness are explored via interviews and analyses. The results show that the views on the ecosystem services concept and its usefulness are generally very positive. Conceptual knowledge use is perceived as important as is the recognition of monetary valuation of ES. However, clarification of the distinction between implicit and explicit use of the concept by stakeholders is needed. Finally, results indicate that a deeper understanding of monetary valuation of ecosystem services by municipal staff members is connected with a more critical view on monetary valuation. It is concluded that detailed and clear definitions and guidelines are needed in order to support the process of implementing ES in municipalities.

  • 19.
    Beery, Thomas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Wolf-Watz, Daniel
    Mid Sweden University.
    Nature to place: rethinking the environmental connectedness perspective2014In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 40, no December, p. 198-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental connectedness perspective posits that direct encounter with generalized, or non-specific “nature,” leads to environmental connectedness and subsequent pro-environmental behavior. This article examines this perspective and proposes a place-based application of the nature encounter-environmental behavior relation. An empirical study using data from a national survey on outdoor recreation and nature-based tourism is presented. Results show a minimal relationship between measures of environmental connectedness and self-reports of environmental behavior. The following examination of the environmental connectedness perspective reveals that environmental connectedness is rooted in a material/objective perspective, neglecting the human domain of perceptions, values, and representations. The environment as “nature” is portrayed as a geographically undefined agent with the inherent power to change human attitudes and behavior. Based on this, the article concludes with a proposed replacement of the elusive concept of nature for the relational concept of place.

  • 20.
    Brink, Ebba
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Wamsler, Christine
    Lund University.
    Adolfsson, Maria
    Trelleborg Municipal.
    Axelsson, Monica
    Kristianstad Municipal.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Bjorn, Helena
    Lomma Municipal.
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Lund University.
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö University.
    Jephson, Therese
    SALA.
    Narvelo, Widar
    Helsingborg Municipal.
    Ness, Barry
    lund University.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Palo, Thomas
    SLU Umeå.
    Sjeldrup, Magnus
    Bjuv Municipal.
    Stalhammar, Sanna
    Lund University.
    Thiere, Geraldine
    Lomma Municipal.
    On the road to 'research municipalities': analysing transdisciplinarity in municipal ecosystem services and adaptation planning2018In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 765-784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transdisciplinary research and collaboration is widely acknowledged as a critical success factor for solution-oriented approaches that can tackle complex sustainability challenges, such as biodiversity loss, pollution, and climate-related hazards. In this context, city governments' engagement in transdisciplinarity is generally seen as a key condition for societal transformation towards sustainability. However, empirical evidence is rare. This paper presents a self-assessment of a joint research project on ecosystem services and climate adaptation planning (ECOSIMP) undertaken by four universities and seven Swedish municipalities. We apply a set of design principles and guiding questions for transdisciplinary sustainability projects and, on this basis, identify key aspects for supporting university-municipality collaboration. We show that: (1) selecting the number and type of project stakeholders requires more explicit consideration of the purpose of societal actors' participation; (2) concrete, interim benefits for participating practitioners and organisations need to be continuously discussed; (3) promoting the 'inter', i.e., interdisciplinary and inter-city learning, can support transdisciplinarity and, ultimately, urban sustainability and long-term change. In this context, we found that design principles for transdisciplinarity have the potential to (4) mitigate project shortcomings, even when transdisciplinarity is not an explicit aim, and (5) address differences and allow new voices to be heard. We propose additional guiding questions to address shortcomings and inspire reflexivity in transdisciplinary projects.

  • 21.
    Brink, Ebba
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Wamsler, Christine
    Lund University .
    Adolfsson, Maria
    Trelleborg Municipality.
    Axelsson, Monica
    Kristianstad Municipality.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Björn, Helena
    Lomma Municipality.
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Lund University.
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö University.
    Jephson, Therese
    Scania Association .
    Narvelo, Widar
    Helsingborg municipality.
    Ness, Barry
    Lund University .
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Palo, Thomas
    SLU Umeå.
    Sjeldrup, Magnus
    Bjuv Municipality.
    Stålhammar, Sanna
    Lund University .
    Thiere, Geraldine
    Lomma Municipality.
    On the road to ‘research municipalities’: analysing transdisciplinarity in municipal ecosystem services and adaptation planning2017In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transdisciplinary research and collaboration is widely acknowledged as a critical success factor for solution-oriented approaches that can tackle complex sustainability challenges, such as biodiversity loss, pollution, and climate-related hazards. In this context, city governments’ engagement in transdisciplinarity is generally seen as a key condition for societal transformation towards sustainability. However, empirical evidence is rare. This paper presentsa self-assessment of a joint research project on ecosystem services and climate adaptation planning (ECOSIMP) undertaken by four universities and seven Swedish municipalities. We apply a set of design principles and guiding questions for transdisciplinary sustainability projects and, on this basis, identify key aspects for supporting university–municipality collaboration. We show that: (1) selecting the number and type of project stakeholders requires more explicit consideration of the purpose of societal actors’ participation; (2) concrete, interim benefits for participating practitioners and organisations need to be continuously discussed; (3) promoting the ‘inter’, i.e., interdisciplinary and inter-city learning, can support transdisciplinarity and, ultimately, urban sustainability and long-term change. In this context, we found that design principles for transdisciplinarity have the potential to (4) mitigate project shortcomings, even when transdisciplinarity is not an explicit aim, and (5) address differences and allow new voices to be heard. We propose additional guiding questions to address shortcomings and inspire reflexivity in transdisciplinary projects.

  • 22.
    Ernst, Julie
    et al.
    USA.
    Blood, Nathaniel
    USA.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Environmental action and student environmental leaders: exploring the influence of environmental attitudes, locus of control, and sense of personal responsibility2015In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 149-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Student Climate and Conservation Congress (SC3) is a joint educational effort between the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and the Green Schools Alliance that aims to develop the next generation of conservation leaders through fostering action competence in youth. Data from SC3 participants was used to investigate four predictors of adult environmental behavior (environmental attitudes, locus of control, sense of personal responsibility, intention) to explore their predictability of environmental action and intention toward future involvement in environmental action in student environmental leaders. Of the four variables explored, pre-program levels of environmental attitudes was a significant predictor of environmental action. Additionally, changes in levels of environmental attitudes significantly predicted environmental action, with an increase in environmental attitudes being associated with a decrease in environmental action. Pre-program levels of environmental attitudes and sense of personal responsibility, and an interaction between the two, potentially were predictors of intention toward future involvement in environmental action. Changes in pre- and post-program levels of environmental attitudes, locus of control, and sense of personal responsibility did not significantly predict intention toward future involvement in environmental action, nor did environmental action. Implications for programming and research, in light of the study’s limitations, are discussed.

  • 23.
    Giusti, Matteo
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Svane, Ulrika
    Stockholm University.
    Raymond, Christopher M.
    Swedish University Agricultural Sciences.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    A framework to assess where and how children connect to nature2018In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of the green infrastructure in urban areas largely ignores how people's relation to nature, or human-nature connection (HNC), can be nurtured. One practical reason for this is the lack of a framework to guide the assessment of where people, and more importantly children, experience significant nature situations and establish nature routines. This paper develops such a framework. We employed a mixed-method approach to understand what qualities of nature situations connect children to nature (RQ1), what constitutes children's HNC (RQ2), and how significant nature situations and children's HNC relate to each other over time (RQ3). We first interviewed professionals in the field of connecting children to nature (N = 26), performed inductive thematic analysis of these interviews, and then further examined the inductive findings by surveying specialists (N = 275). We identified 16 qualities of significant nature situations (e.g., "awe," "engagement of senses," "involvement ofmentors") and 10 abilities that constitute children's HNC (e. g., "feeling comfortable in natural spaces," " feeling attached to natural spaces," "taking care of nature"). We elaborated three principles to answer our research questions: (1) significant nature situations are various and with differing consequences for children's HNC; (2) children's HNC is a complex embodied ability; (3) children's HNC progresses over time through diverse nature routines. Together, these findings form the Assessment framework for Children's Human Nature Situations (ACHUNAS). ACHUNAS is a comprehensive framework that outlines what to quantify or qualify when assessing " child-nature connecting" environments. It guides the assessment of where and how children connect to nature, stimulating both the design of nature-connecting human habitats as well as pedagogical approaches to HNC.

  • 24.
    Gulsrud, Natalie M.
    et al.
    Denmark.
    Raymond, Christopher M.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Rutt, Rebecca L.
    Denmark.
    Stahl Olafson, Anton
    Denmark.
    Plieninger, Tobias
    Denmark.
    Sandberg, Mattias
    University of Gothenburg.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    ‘Rage against the machine’?: the opportunities and risks concerning the automation of urban green infrastructure2018In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 180, p. 85-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary society is increasingly impacted by automation; however, few studies have considered the potential consequences of automation on ecosystems and their management (hereafter the automation of urbangreen infrastructure or UGI). This Perspective Essay takes up this discussion by asking how a digital approach to UGI planning and management mediates the configuration and development of UGI and to whose benefit? This is done through a review of key issues and trends in digital approaches to UGI planning and management. We first conceptualize automation from a social, ecological, and technological interactions perspective and use this lens to present an overview of the risks and opportunities of UGI automation with respect to selected case studies. Results of this analysis are used to develop a conceptual framework for the assessment of the material and governance implications of automated UGIs. We find that, within any given perspective, the automation of UGI entails a complex dialectic between efficiency, human agency and empowerment. Further, risks and opportunities associated with UGI automation are not fixed but are dynamic properties of changing contextual tensions concerning power, actors, rules of the game and discourse at multiple scales. We conclude the paper by outlining a research agenda on how to consider different digital advances within a social-ecological-technological approach.

  • 25.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    van Dijk, Jiska
    Norge.
    Bongard, Terje
    Norge.
    Seidl, Roman
    Schweiz.
    Stålhammar, Sanna
    Lund University .
    Managing the transformation –: perspectives from human evolution and human behavioral ecology2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming the current society towards sustainability is a formidable task, requiring changes at many levels of society. Reductions in our use of natural resources and environmental impacts of human societies are necessary, while maintaining a progress in satisfying human well-being in a growing world population. Considerable efforts in developing low impact economy and technology will be needed to change societies towards more sustainable social-ecological systems. However, perhaps the most challenging aspect of this transformation is to manage the very roots of the problem: the human mind. Implicit in many, if not all, of the well-known causes of environmental degradation (e.g., externalities of businesses and individual behavior, tragedy of the unmanaged commons, conspicuous consumption) are a human mind originally evolved to maximize individual reproductive success within short-sighted perspectives and small social groups. We are therefore ill equipped to take responsibility for long-term global environmental problems. We argue that an understanding of human evolution and the functioning of the brain as an adaptive unit underlying human behavior will be necessary in order to create societal reorganization and incentives that successfully deal with the challenges of the Anthropocene. Cooperation and altruistic behavior are certainly part of the human repertoire but only if social contexts are arranged to support these behaviors. We believe that evolutionary approaches to human behavior can no longer be left out of the discussion on the environmental crisis, and in environmental policy, and that managing the transformation will also require applying evolutionary science to human behavior.

  • 26.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö University.
    Wamsler, Christine
    Lund University .
    Brink, Ebba
    Lund University.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Palo, Thomas R.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Science.
    Schubert, Per
    Malmö University.
    Stålhammar, Sanna
    Lund University .
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Lund University.
    Johansson, Michael
    Lund University.
    Implementering av ekosystemtjänst-begreppet i kommunal verksamhet: slutrapport2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Projektet ECOSIMP handlar om förutsättningen för att implementera begreppet ekosystemtjänst, i fortsättningen kallat EST-begreppet, i kommunerna, och undersöker bland annat hur kommunala tjänstemän och politiker ser på denna utmaning. En intervjustudie genomfördes med tjänstemän och politikeri de sju medverkande kommunerna. I en studie av Malmö stad undersöktes hur ekosystemtjänst-relaterade begrepp har integrerats i översiktsplaner ochutvecklats till ett verktyg i hållbar samhällsplanering. Ett annat delprojekt handlar om miljökonsekvens-bedömningar (MKB) och behovet av metodutveckling för att integrera ekosystemtjänstansatsen i MKB, där möjligheten att integrera ekosystemtjänster i den så kallade RIAM-metoden analyserades. Projektet innehåller också en analys av arbetet med att integrera ekosystemtjänsteri kommunernas klimatanpassning, så kallad ekosystembaserad klimatanpassning (EbA). Slutligen redovisas en analys av det transdisciplinära arbetssättet inom ECOSIMP-projektet. Resultaten visar att EST-begreppet idag är relativt välkänt i kommunerna och att det finns en övervägande positiv inställning till det och förhoppningar om att det ska skapa större möjlighet till miljöhänsyn. Förståelsen av begreppet behöver dock fördjupas i den kommunala verksamheten och distinktionen mellan implicit och explicit användning av EST-begreppet och den relaterade EST-ansatsen förtydligas. Ett antal hinder och möjligheter för att börja använda begreppet och för att uppnå etappmålet 2018 identifierades också. Bland annat upplevs innebörden av etappmålet 2018 som oklar, och bara en mindre del av de intervjuade i kommunerna ansåg att etappmålet skulle nås. Betydelsen av att politiker och allmänhet får kännedom om, och förståelse för, EST-begreppet betonades också. Malmö framstår som ett bra exempel på hur långsiktigt arbete för en hållbar stadsutveckling kan skapa förutsättningar att integrera ekosystemtjänster i den fysiska planeringen. Analysen av EbA i kommunerna visade att initiativ relaterade till klimatanpassning och ekosystemtjänster oftast inte är samordnade, men de skulle kunna utvecklas i den riktningen genom bättre samordning mellan kommunernas olika enheter och integrering av EbA i den långsiktiga planeringen utifrån kunskap om nutida och framtida klimatrisker. Verktyg för att värdera förändringar i EST till följd av mänsklig exploatering behövs och här föreslås en utveckling av den såkallade RIAM-metoden, som kan erbjuda ett sätt att väga in olika EST i planeringen. Den transdisciplinära analysen visar på värdet av nära samverkan mellan forskning och kommuner kring implementeringen av EST-ansatsen, men också på behovet av politiskt och ekonomiskt stöd för att frigöra tid för kommunerna att delta i sådana projekt.

  • 27.
    Lekies, Kristi S.
    et al.
    The Ohio State University.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Everyone needs a rock: collecting items from nature in childhood2013In: Children, Youth and Environments, ISSN 1546-2250, E-ISSN 1546-2250, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 66-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about children’s nature collecting behavior. This study examined the extent of childhood collecting of natural items, the types of items collected, gender differences in items collected, and comparisons between collectors and non- collectors in feelings of connection to nature. The sample consisted of undergraduate students of a large university who were part of a study of childhood nature experiences. Over 80 percent of participants reported collecting items from nature as children, and a number of gender differences were noted. Furthermore, collectors scored higher than non-collectors on a measure of connection to nature. Additional research is needed to understand collecting behavior in childhood and how it may contribute to positive environmental attitudes in adulthood. 

  • 28.
    Palo, Thomas R.
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Science .
    Lagercrantz, Karen
    Skåne Association of Local Authorities.
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Lund University.
    Johansson, Michael
    Lund University.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Wamsler, Christine
    Lund University .
    Brink, Ebba
    Lund University .
    Schubert, Per
    Malmö University.
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö University.
    Priority areas in municipality planning: ecosystemservices, environmental impact assessments and research areas2016In: One Ecosystem, ISSN 2367-8194, Vol. 1, article id e9869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several pressing issues face municipal planners including increased land use and climate change. Managing these issues requires a balance between different actions to accommodate citizen’s demands of ecosystem services (ES) and development projects. The implementation of ES as a new tool for assessments needs to be contrasted by research considering existing tools such as Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). ES has been introduced as a policy tool at the governmental level but implementation at the local and regional scale is still needed; municipalities could benefit from collaboration with the research community for state of the art methods. One obstacle for implementation of ES is that it is not always easy for laymen to understand and additionally, the ES concept may be weakly supported by science. The municipalities realize that a society on its way towards sustainability takes advantage of new knowledge and that interactions with research will put them in the forefront of new scientific questions. The municipalities ask for research that takes a citizen perspective and research that prioritizes questions other than pure environmental considerations. Priorities in municipality planning are based on local conditions and rely on EIA. Many ecological indicators are already covered in EIA and this is reflected in Swedish Comprehensive Plans (SCP) documents, yet need further analysis is needed to be a part of ES. The SCPs present concepts at a policy level and rarely provide a more detailed plan of action compatible with the ES approach.

    New information: We found that the use of ES concepts in Swedish Comprehensive Plans and in EIA is still not common and in need of further support from research and in practice. The EIA is decisive for comprehensive planning documents in the Swedish municipalities and follows standard format over time and between municipalities. ES is focused on human needs while the EIA describes place based assessments on environmental impact rather than feedback to the society by the intervention. Municipalities of south Sweden ask for research support in many different areas, for instance how to set up proper organization for implementation of ES and environmental issues, but priorities are based on their local conditions. The results shows that collaboration between stakeholders and researchers is needed which can create incentives, so that the decisions made by individuals, communities, corporations, and governments may be able to promote widely shared values compatible with ES. Researchers and municipalities who work on an operational level face many challenges in promoting greater use of the ES approach, with some of them yet to be defined. We conclude that implementation of ES could draw from lessons learned in the use of EIA. Further, it is presented that ES has the potential for greater public and stakeholder feedback into decisions as compared to EIA.

  • 29.
    Schubert, Per
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö University.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Wamsler, Christine
    Lund University .
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Roth, Andreas
    Malmö University.
    Stålhammar, Sanna
    Lund University .
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Lund University.
    Johansson, Michael
    Lund University.
    Palo, Thomas R.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Science .
    Implementation of the ecosystem services approach in Swedish municipal planning2018In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 298-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While ecosystem-based planning approaches are increasingly promoted through international and national policies, municipalities are still struggling with translating them into practice. Against this background, this paper aims to increase the knowledge of current advances and possible ways to support the implementation of the ecosystem services (ES) approach at the municipal level. More specifically, we analyze how ES have been integrated into comprehensive planning within the municipality of Malmö in Sweden over the last 60 years, a declared forerunner in local environmental governance. Based on a content analysis of comprehensive plans over the period 1956–2014 and interviews with municipal stakeholders, this paper demonstrates how planning has shifted over time toward a more holistic view of ES and their significance for human well-being and urban sustainability. Both explicit and implicit applications of the ES concept were found in the analyzed comprehensive plans and associated programs and projects. Our study shows how these applications reflect international, national, and local policy changes, and indicates how municipalities can gradually integrate the ES approach into comprehensive planning and facilitate the transition from implicit to more explicit knowledge use.

  • 30.
    Schubert, Per
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Lund University.
    Johansson, Michael
    Lund University.
    Brink, Ebba
    Lund University.
    Wamsler, Christine
    Lund University .
    Palo, Thomas
    Swedish University of Agricultural Science .
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö University.
    Stålhammar, Sanna
    Lund University.
    Ekosystemtjänstbegreppet: en historisk tillbakablick och den förväntade rollen i svensk miljöpolicy.2017In: Urban Utveckling och Interaktion / [ed] Borén, T., Stockholm: Svenska Sällskapet för Antropologi och Geografi , 2017, p. 213-237Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    van Dijk, Jiska
    et al.
    Norge.
    Bongard, Terje
    Norge.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    May, Roel
    Norge.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    The value of nature for growth, development and human well-being – perspectives from human evolution and human behavioral ecology2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Wamsler, Christine
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Niven, Lisa
    Lund University.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Lund University.
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö University.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Osmani, Adelina
    Lund University.
    Palo, Thomas
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Stålhammar, Sanna
    Lund University.
    Operationalizing ecosystem-based adaptation: harnessing ecosystem services to buffer communities against climate change2016In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecosystem-based approaches for climate change adaptation are promoted at international, national, and local levels by both scholars and practitioners. However, local planning practices that support these approaches are scattered, and measures are neither systematically implemented nor comprehensively reviewed. Against this background, this paper advances the operationalization of ecosystem-based adaptation by improving our knowledge of how ecosystem-based approaches can be considered in local planning (operational governance level). We review current research on ecosystem services in urban areas and examine four Swedish coastal municipalities to identify the key characteristics of both implemented and planned measures that support ecosystem-based adaptation. The results show that many of the measures that have been implemented focus on biodiversity rather than climate change adaptation, which is an important factor in only around half of all measures. Furthermore, existing measures are limited in their focus regarding the ecological structures and the ecosystem services they support, and the hazards and risk factors they address. We conclude that a more comprehensive approach to sustainable ecosystem-based adaptation planning and its systematic mainstreaming is required. Our framework for the analysis of ecosystem-based adaptation measures proved to be useful in identifying how ecosystem-related matters are addressed in current practice and strategic planning, and in providing knowledge on how ecosystem-based adaptation can further be considered in urban planning practice. Such a systematic analysis framework can reveal the ecological structures, related ecosystem services, and risk-reducing approaches that are missing and why. This informs the discussion about why specific measures are not considered and provides pathways for alternate measures/designs, related operations, and policy processes at different scales that can foster sustainable adaptation and transformation in municipal governance and planning.

  • 33.
    Wolf-Watz, Daniel
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Sandell, Klas
    Karlstads universitet.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro universitet.
    Friluftsliv och miljöengagemang: sammankopplade men utan enkla samband2014In: Friluftsliv i förändring: studier från svenska upplevelselandskap / [ed] Fredman, P., Stenseke, M., & Sandell, K., Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2014, p. 152-166Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 33 of 33
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