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  • 1.
    Chauvet, Eric
    et al.
    Frankrike.
    Ferreira, V.
    Portugal.
    Giller, P. S.
    Irland.
    McKie, B. G.
    SLU, Uppsala.
    Tiegs, S. D.
    USA.
    Woodward, G.
    Storbritannien.
    Elosegi, A.
    Spanien.
    Dobson, M.
    Storbritannien.
    Fleituch, T.
    Polen.
    Graca, M. A. S.
    Portugal.
    Gulis, V.
    USA.
    Hladyz, S.
    Australien.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Lecerf, A.
    Frankrike.
    Pozo, J.
    Spanien.
    Preda, E.
    Rumänien.
    Riipinen, M.
    Storbritannien.
    RisŸnoveanu, G.
    Rumänien.
    Vadineanu, A.
    Rumänien.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gessner, M. O.
    Tyskland.
    Litter decomposition as an indicator of stream ecosystem functioning at local-to-continental scales: insights from the European RivFunction project2016In: Large-scale ecology: model systems to global perspectives / [ed] Alex J. Dumbrell, Rebecca L. Kordas; Woodward, Guy, London: Academic Press , 2016, Vol. 55, p. 99-182Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RivFunction is a pan-European initiative that started in 2002 and was aimed at establishing a novel functional-based approach to assessing the ecological status of rivers. Litter decomposition was chosen as the focal process because it plays a central role in stream ecosystems and is easy to study in the field. Impacts of two stressors that occur across the continent, nutrient pollution and modified riparian vegetation, were examined at > 200 paired sites in nine European ecoregions. In response to the former, decomposition was dramatically slowed at both extremes of a 1000-fold nutrient gradient, indicating nutrient limitation in unpolluted sites, highly variable responses across Europe in moderately impacted streams, and inhibition via associated toxic and additional stressors in highly polluted streams. Riparian forest modification by clear cutting or replacement of natural vegetation by plantations (e.g. conifers, eucalyptus) or pasture produced similarly complex responses. Clear effects caused by specific riparian disturbances were observed in regionally focused studies, but general trends across different types of riparian modifications were not apparent, in part possibly because of important indirect effects. Complementary field and laboratory experiments were undertaken to tease apart the mechanistic drivers of the continental scale field bioassays by addressing the influence of litter, fungal and detritivore diversity. These revealed generally weak and context-dependent effects on decomposition, suggesting high levels of redundancy (and hence potential insurance mechanisms that can mitigate a degree of species loss) within the food web. Reduced species richness consistently increased decomposition variability, if not the absolute rate. Further field studies were aimed at identifying important sources of this variability (e.g. litter quality, temporal variability) to help constrain ranges of predicted decomposition rates in different field situations. Thus, although many details still need to be resolved, litter decomposition holds considerable potential in some circumstances to capture impairment of stream ecosystem functioning. For instance, species traits associated with the body size and metabolic capacity of the consumers were often the main driver at local scales, and these were often translated into important determinants of otherwise apparently contingent effects at larger scales. Key insights gained from conducting continental scale studies included resolving the apparent paradox of inconsistent relationships between nutrients and decomposition rates, as the full complex multidimensional picture emerged from the large-scale dataset, of which only seemingly contradictory fragments had been seen previously.

  • 2.
    Hladyz, Sally
    et al.
    University College Cork, Department of Zoology.
    Åsbjörnsson, Kajsa
    University College Cork, Department of Zoology.
    Chauvet, Eric
    Université de Toulouse.
    Dobson, Michael
    Manchester Metropolitan University.
    Elosegi, Arturo
    University of the Basque Country, Bilbao.
    Ferreira, Verónica
    University of Coimbra.
    Fleituch, Tadeusz
    Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków.
    Gessner, Mark O.
    Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Kastanienbaum.
    Giller, Paul S.
    University College Cork, Department of Zoology.
    Gulis, Vladislav
    Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra.
    Hutton, Stephen. A.
    University College Cork, Department of Zoology.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Lamothe, Sylvain
    Université de Toulouse.
    Lecerf, Antoine
    Université de Toulouse.
    Malmqvist, Björn
    Umeå University.
    McKie, Brendan G.
    Umeå University.
    Nistorescu, Marius
    University of Bucharest.
    Preda, Elena
    University of Bucharest.
    Riipinen, Miira P.
    Manchester Metropolitan University.
    Risnoveanu, Geta
    University of Bucharest.
    Schindler, Markus
    Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Kastanienbaum.
    Tiegs, Scott D.
    Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Kastanienbaum.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Woodward, Guy
    University College Cork.
    Stream ecosystem functioning in an agricultural landscape: the importance of terrestrial-aquatic linkages2011In: Ecosystems in a human-modified landscape: a European perspective / [ed] Guy Woodward, San Diego: Academic Press, 2011, Vol. 44, p. 211-276Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The loss of native riparian vegetation and its replacement with non-native species or grazing land for agriculture is a worldwide phenomenon, but one that is prevalent in Europe, reflecting the heavily-modified nature of the continent's landscape. The consequences of these riparian alterations for freshwater ecosystems remain largely unknown, largely because bioassessment has traditionally focused on the impacts of organic pollution on community structure. We addressed the need for a broader perspective, which encompasses changes at the catchment scale, by comparing ecosystem processes in woodland reference sites with those with altered riparian zones. We assessed a range of riparian modifications, including clearance for pasture and replacement of woodland with a range of low diversity plantations, in 100 streams to obtain a continental-scale perspective of the major types of alterations across Europe. Subsequently, we focused on pasture streams, as an especially prevalent widespread riparian alteration, by characterising their structural (e.g. invertebrate and fish communities) and functional (e.g. litter decomposition, algal production, herbivory) attributes in a country (Ireland) dominated by this type of landscape modification, via field and laboratory experiments. We found that microbes became increasingly important as agents of decomposition relative to macrofauna (invertebrates) in impacted sites in general and in pasture streams in particular. Resource quality of grass litter (e.g., carbon : nutrient ratios, lignin and cellulose content) was a key driver of decomposition rates in pasture streams. These systems also relied more heavily on autochthonous algal production than was the case in woodland streams, which were more detrital based. These findings suggest that these pasture streams might be fundamentally different from their native, ancestral woodland state, with a shift towards greater reliance on autochthonous-based processes. This could have a destabilizing effect on the dynamics of the food web relative to the slower, detrital-based pathways that dominate in woodland streams.

  • 3.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Creating citywide water-energy-food nexus opportunities: FSM as driving force2014In: From faecal sludge to fuel: safe sanitation with business opportunities (workshop), 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Measuring residence time distribution in a vegetated pond2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    The challenges of keeping floodplains and wetlands in rapidly growing cities: lessons learnt from 24 years of observing Vientiane, Lao PDR2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Toilets need allies - breaking down silo thinking for decentralized sanitation2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7. Mark, O.
    et al.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Amena, Z.
    Babel, M. S.
    Application of hydroinformatics tools for water quality modeling and management: case study of Vientiane, Lao PDR2010In: Journal of Hydroinformatics, ISSN 1464-7141, E-ISSN 1465-1734, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 161-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of hydroinformatics tools is restricted in developing countries due to the non-availability of the required data and information under local conditions. This paper presents the state of water quality of the city of Vientiane (capital of Lao PDR) before the extensive rectification of its drainage network and describes an approach and methodology for water quality modeling. This is done with respect to the application of a combined hydrodynamic/water quality model based on minimal input data and observations for model verification. It further evaluates options to improve the deteriorating water quality observed in the rectified channels associated with the absence of suitable wastewater treatment. Two pollutants associated with the enrichment of receiving water bodies by wastewaters, total-P and NH4-N, are modeled. The modelling study is carried out in three steps: dry weather flow simulation, wet weather flow simulation and nutrient modeling using MOUSE. The dry weather flow simulations are carried out to calibrate the model for hydraulic roughness coefficient, dispersion coefficient and travel time. The wet weather flow simulations analyze the effect on flooding of two channel states, namely unvegetated and vegetated conditions. Nutrient modeling therefore evaluates removal efficiency by the vegetation. Model results are compared with the observed data and recommendations are made with respect to the predicted effects of the water quality improvement schemes studied. In conclusion, the modeling approach herein presented can be applied for performance analyses of urban channels in the developing part of the world, where data are often limited.

  • 8.
    Minh Tran, Thao
    et al.
    Vietnam.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Thanh Doan, Phuong
    Vietnam.
    Van Tran, Man
    Vietnam.
    Capacity of Vitiver grass in treatment of a mixture of labaratory and domestic wastewaters2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     In this study, laboratory wastewater containing organic matters, heavy metals and aromatic compounds, was treated by vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides) as a phytoremediation method to remove the above three groups of pollutants. Sewage effluent, as a source of nutrient supply for plant growth, was firstly fed to two wetland systems: mini horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) and floating raft (FR) wetlands. Next, laboratory wastewater was added gradually to mix with sewage. Nominal hydraulic retention time in both wetlands are 12 hours. Pollutants removal efficiencies were monitored. Microbial community change corresponding with each stages of sewage only and mixture with laboratory wastewater was also examined. The examined microbial community includes Nitrogen-fixing (N-fixing) bacteria, Phosphate-solubilizing (P-solubilizing) microorganism, Pseudomonas sp., and Zoogloea sp. 

    In HSSF wetland, base materials (gravel and sand), algae, and vetiver root were in turn investigated for pollutant removal efficiencies. The results reveal that even with the presences of heavy metals and aromatic compounds, vetiver presented reasonable removal efficiencies of about 62%, 68.6%, and 58.3% for BOD, TN, and TP removal, respectively. Base materials showed almost no effect on pollutant removal. Algae was slightly responsible for approximate 6.3%, 16.6%, and 19.7% of BOD, TN, and TP removals, respectively. On the other hand vetiver roots, in term of heavy metals, had an impressive removal efficiencies of 99.2, 95.8, 96.2, and 96.7% of Cr+6 (in K2Cr2O7), Mn (MnSO4), Fe (FeSO4), and Cu (CuSO4), respectively. For aromatic compounds, the wetland is responsible for 96.8 and almost 100% of correspondingly phenol and benzene removal efficiencies. For microbial aspect, N-fixing microorganisms (e.g. Azospirillum sp., Azotobacter sp.) and Phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (Bacillus sp.) increased gradually in population during domestic wastewater feeding stage. When laboratory wastewater was added, N-fixing and P-solubilizing bacteria were quantitatively decreased slightly while population of Pseudomonas sp. increased. Besides, Zoogloea sp. was also found increasing through out the experiment and keeping a stable growth even during laboratory wastewater adding. 

    In FR wetland, both algae and vetiver root were also investigated for BOD and aromatic compounds and heavy metals. The outcomes show similar tendencies in treatment and microbial behaviours as in HSSF wetland. Vetiver grass, mainly responsible for organic matters and nutrients removal, presented slightly lower removal efficiencies than those in HSSF wetland. The average values of removal efficiencies are 59%, 63.5%, and 53.0% for BOD, TN, and TP removal, respectively. Algae, also, took minor responsibility for approximate 3.3%, 9.1%, and 8.9% of BOD, TN, and TP removals, respectively. Heavy metals of Cr+6 (in K2Cr2O7), Mn (MnSO4), Fe (FeSO4), and Cu (CuSO4) were found removing less than in HSSF wetland with average removal efficiencies values of 92.4, 85.1, 91.8, and 91.5%, respectively, by 

    vetiver root. Algae show almost no effect on heavy metals and aromatic removals. The vetiver root likewise plays important role in phenol and benzene removals with values of 91.5 and 96% in efficiency, respectively. N-fixing and P-solubilizing microorganisms, Pseudomonas sp., and Zoogloea sp. presented similar responses tendencies to different living condition when domestic and laboratory wastewaters, in turn, were fed.

  • 9. Petersen, Robert C.
    et al.
    Petersen, Lena B. M.
    Lunds universitet.
    Wallace, J. Bruce
    Univ. of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA.
    Influence of velocity and food availability on catchnet dimensions of Neureclipsis bimaculata (Trichoptera: Polycentropodidae)1984In: Holarctic Ecology, ISSN 0105-9327, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 380-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Larvae of Neureclipsis bimaculata (Trichoptera: Polycentropodidae) construct elaborate catchnets in lotic habitats to trap small drifting invertebrate prey. Three populations located at two oligotrophic and one eutrophic site were studied in southern Sweden. Measurements were made of larval weight, net size, seston quality and quantity, and stream velocity.

    Neureclipsis larvae alter their net dimensions in response to both velocity and seston concentration. This was determined by comparing net structure and seston at the three locations. Larvae from the eutrophic, high quality seston site attain a significantly (P < 0.001) heavier instar V dry weight, spin a smaller catchnet, filter a volume of water dependent on body size, and slightly alter their catchnet dimensions with velocity. Larvae from the two oligothrophic sites are significantly smaller than those from the eutrophic site, spin a larger net at comparable velocities, filter a larger volume of water at comparable weights, and alter net dimensions with velocity.Estimates of silk production indicate that the net cost is minimized by spinning a very fine silken strand and by adding silk over a period of time. The cost while large is offset by a large capture rate of prey.

    The structure of Neureclipsis nets appears to be the result of a trade-off between maximizing food capture and minimizing hydraulic stress on the net.

  • 10.
    Pinay, Gilles
    et al.
    Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle & Evolutive, Montpellier.
    Gumiero, B.
    Department of Ecology, University of Bologna.
    Tabacchi, E.
    Laboratoire Dynamique de la Biodiversité.
    Gimenez, O.
    Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle & Evolutive, Montpellier.
    Tabacchi-Planty, A. M.
    Laboratoire Dynamique de la Biodiversité, Toulouse.
    Hefting, M. M.
    Department of Geobiology, University of Utrecht.
    Burt, T. P.
    Department of Geography, University of Durham.
    Black, V. A.
    Department of Geography, Loughborough University of Technology.
    Nilsson, C.
    Landscape Ecology Group, Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Iordache, V.
    University of Bucharest, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Bureau, F.
    Laboratoire d'Écologie ECODIV, University of Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Petts, G. E.
    Department of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham.
    Decamps, H.
    Laboratoire Dynamique de la Biodiversité, Toulouse.
    Patterns of denitrification rates in European alluvial soils under various hydrological regimes2007In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 252-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Denitrification in floodplain soils is one of the main biological processes emitting and reducing nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas, and the main process responsible for the buffering capacity of riparian zones against diffuse nitrate pollution. 2. The aim of this study was to measure denitrification rates under a wide range of current climatic conditions and hydrological regimes in Europe (from latitude 64 degrees N to latitude 42 degrees N and from longitude 2 degrees W to longitude 25 degrees E), in order to determine the response patterns of this microbial process under different climatic and hydrological conditions, and to identify denitrification proxies robust enough to be used at the European scale. 3. Denitrification activity was significant in all the floodplain soils studied whatever the latitude. However, we found an increase in rates of an order of magnitude from high to mid latitudes. Maximum rates (above 30 g N m(-2) month(-1)) were measured in the maritime conditions of the Trent floodplain. These rates are similar to mineralisation rates measured in alluvial soils and of the same order of magnitude as the amount of N stored in herbaceous plants in alluvial soils. 4. We used Multivariate Adaptative Regression Splines to relate the response variable denitrification with five relevant predictors, namely soil moisture, temperature, silt plus clay, nitrate content and herbaceous plant biomass. 5. Soil moisture, temperature, and nitrate were the three main control variables of microbial denitrification in alluvial soils in decreasing order of importance. 6. The model developed for denitrification with interaction effects outperformed a pure additive model. Soil moisture was involved in all interactions, emphasising its importance in predicting denitrification. 7. These results are discussed in the context of scenarios for future change in European hydrological regimes.

  • 11. Tessier, L
    et al.
    Boisvert, J L
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Lunds universitet.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Lunds universitet.
    Anomalies on capture nets of Hydropsyche slossonae larvae (Trichoptera; Hydropsychidae) following a sublethal chronic exposure to cadmium2000In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 108, no 3, p. 425-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A laboratory study on the sublethal effects of cadmium (Cd) on the net-spinning process of the larvae of Hydropsyche slossonae was conducted in order to assess the potential of net anomalies as an indicator of chronic exposure to Cd. Two major anomalies with different frequency levels were identified after chronic exposure to 0.37, 1.2, 11.6, 21.4 and 43.3 μg l−1 of Cd. The first was a distortion of the midline meshes where the diamond-shape structure is disrupted and the meshes are separated by extra strands (called ‘midline’ anomaly). The second aberration consisted of a distortion of the rectilinear structure of net opening by strands being fused or added over the meshes (called ‘crossover’ anomaly). The midline distortion may be linked to a physiological stress caused by Cd, which can affect the control of the net-spinning process. It was not possible to relate the crossover aberrations to a specific toxic action of Cd, but data indicated that both anomalies are independent from each other and that two modes of action could be implicated. Protein analyses of capture nets have revealed silk polypeptide modifications at the highest Cd concentration tested, indicating a possible effect of Cd interaction with silk proteins. However, neither a gradient-concentration nor a time-dependent response could be established with both aberration frequencies. Silk protein modifications would rather play a secondary role in the appearance of both net anomalies, and mostly at a high concentration level. Finally, the toxicity curves (EC50) show that the sensitivity threshold for both types of aberration ranged from 1 to 5 μg l−1 which is highly sensitive compared with other sublethal effects of Cd on other macroinvertebrate species. Hence, the use of capture-net anomalies of hydropsychid larvae would represent a valuable indicator of sublethal toxicity induced by Cd and possibly by other metals in running waters.

  • 12. Tessier, L
    et al.
    Boisvert, J L
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Lunds universitet.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Lunds universitet.
    Effects of 2,4-dichlorophenol on the net-spinning behavior of Hydropsyche slossonae larvae (Trichoptera; Hydropsychidae), an early warning signal of chronic toxicity2000In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 207-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to assess the potential of hydropsychid capture net anomalies as a bioindicator of chronic toxicity in streams and rivers, the effects of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) exposure on the net-spinning behavior of Hydropsyche slossonae were examined for anomalies after 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 exposure days to gradient concentration of 2,4-dichlorophenol. The net-spinning behavior was significantly affected when larvae were exposed to 1.0, 10, 25, and 50 μg·L−1, as expressed by the occurrence of two distinct abnormalities. The first one was a distortion of the midline meshes, where the normal diamond-shape structure is disrupted and the meshes are separated by extra strands (called “midline” anomaly). The second aberration observed was called “chaotic” net, where the nets are highly irregular without any real structure or well-defined areas. A good correlation was found between the chaotic net frequencies and the reduction of ATP concentrations in the larvae, indicating possible uncoupling effects of 2,4-DCP on the oxidative phosphorylation process. Toxicity curves demonstrate that the sensitivity threshold of chaotic net frequencies ranged from 3.5 to 7 μg·L−1, which is highly sensitive compared with other sublethal effects of 2,4-DCP on other aquatic species.

  • 13. Tessier, Louis
    et al.
    Boisvert, Jacques L.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Lunds universitet.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Lunds universitet.
    Anomalies on capture nets of Hydropsyche slossonae larvae (Trichoptera; Hydropsychidae), a potential indicator of chronic toxicity of malathion (organophosphate insecticide)2000In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 50, no 1-2, p. 125-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A laboratory study on the sublethal effects of malathion on the net-spinning behavior of the caddisfly larvae Hydropsycheslossonae was conducted in order to assess the potential of net anomalies as an indicator of chronic exposure to organophosphorus insecticides. Two anomalies were identified after chronic exposure to 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 μg l−1 malathion. The first was a distortion of the midline meshes where the normal diamond shape structure was disrupted and the meshes were separated by extra strands (called ‘midline’ anomaly). The second aberration observed was a significant decrease in net symmetry. Both anomalies were highly correlated to the toxic action of malathion, i.e. inhibition of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses of capture nets did not show any modification of silk polypeptides after exposure to malathion, indicating that net distortions were not related to silk composition. Both anomalies seem to represent the symptoms of the specific toxic action of malathion; nevertheless, they can serve as an index of the physiological condition of the larvae, especially the midline anomaly. The symmetry of the nets decreased significantly after exposure to 0.5 and 1.0 μg l−1. However, the toxicity curves (EC50) showed that the sensitivity threshold for the midline anomaly ranged from 0.11 to 0.28 μg l−1, which reflect more realistic exposure to concentrations expected to occur in the field. Hence, the use of capture net anomalies of hydropsychid larvae could represent a valuable indicator of sublethal toxicity induced by malathion and other organophosphorus insecticides in running waters.

  • 14. Tessier, Louis
    et al.
    Boisvert, Jacques L.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Lunds universitet.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Lunds universitet.
    Characterization of Hydropsyche slossonae (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae) capture net polypeptides2000In: Canadian Entomologist, ISSN 0008-347X, E-ISSN 1918-3240, Vol. 132, no 1, p. 59-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A laboratory study on the sublethal effects of malathion on the net-spinning behavior of the caddisfly larvae Hydropsycheslossonae was conducted in order to assess the potential of net anomalies as an indicator of chronic exposure to organophosphorus insecticides. Two anomalies were identified after chronic exposure to 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 μg l−1 malathion. The first was a distortion of the midline meshes where the normal diamond shape structure was disrupted and the meshes were separated by extra strands (called ‘midline’ anomaly). The second aberration observed was a significant decrease in net symmetry. Both anomalies were highly correlated to the toxic action of malathion, i.e. inhibition of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses of capture nets did not show any modification of silk polypeptides after exposure to malathion, indicating that net distortions were not related to silk composition. Both anomalies seem to represent the symptoms of the specific toxic action of malathion; nevertheless, they can serve as an index of the physiological condition of the larvae, especially the midline anomaly. The symmetry of the nets decreased significantly after exposure to 0.5 and 1.0 μg l−1. However, the toxicity curves (EC50) showed that the sensitivity threshold for the midline anomaly ranged from 0.11 to 0.28 μg l−1, which reflect more realistic exposure to concentrations expected to occur in the field. Hence, the use of capture net anomalies of hydropsychid larvae could represent a valuable indicator of sublethal toxicity induced by malathion and other organophosphorus insecticides in running waters.

  • 15. Voelz, Neal J.
    et al.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Lunds universitet.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Lunds universitet.
    The distribution and abundance of hyporheic invertebrates in a small Swedish stream2006In: International Association of Theoretical and Applied Limnology, Vol 29, Pt 4, Proceedings, 2006, p. 1777-1781Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16. Vought, Lena B. M.
    et al.
    Dahl, J
    Pedersen, CL
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Nutrient retention in riparian ecotones1994In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 342-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutrient retention mechanisms in riparian buffer strips are reviewed with emphasis on surface runoff and subsurface flows, the main pathways of exchanges between the stream and its surroundings. Unique physical and biogeochemical properties prevailing in these riparian ecotones dictate the flux of water, nutrients and other exogenous substances between the upland areas and the stream. Removal of nutrients from surface inflows is induced by deposition of sediment bound nutrients and exchange of dissolved nutrients with the soil/litter surface. Removal of nitrogen in subsurface flows can partly be explained by vegetation uptake, but the main mechanism for removal is usually denitrification. In channelized streams, the subsurface inflows have, in most cases, been altered to discharges via drainage tiles, with the exchange flows (water leaving and re-entering the open-channel via the stream bed and banks) being greatly decreased. Consequently, to improve nitrogen removal in these systems, these flows have to be intercepted or reestablished either through restoration of the old stream valley or through managed structures in the buffer strips.

  • 17.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Kullberg, A
    Petersen, R C
    Effect of riparian structure, temperature and channel morphometry on detritus processing in channelized and natural woodland streams in southern Sweden1998In: Aquatic conservation, ISSN 1052-7613, E-ISSN 1099-0755, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 273-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Ten south Swedish streams were selected to represent two distinct types—natural woodland streams and channelized streams. Measurements were made on leaching, decomposition and microbial respiration of the dominant riparian vegetation (European Black Alder), structure of the benthic macroinvertebrate community, macroinvertebrates inhabiting leaf material, channel morphometry, macrophyte composition, water chemistry and total accumulated degree days.

    2. Leaf decomposition rates were not significantly different when channelized streams were compared with natural woodland streams. In channelized streams the average decomposition rate was −0.0556±0.0337 (±S.D.) day−1 compared with −0.0457±0.0115 day−1 in natural woodland streams.

    3. There was significantly higher variation in leaf decomposition among the five channelized streams compared with the five natural streams (F–test, p<0.05). This was mainly due to extremely high decomposition rates in channelized streams colonized by emergent macrophytes.

    4. Alder decomposition rates were low in channelized streams without macrophytes (−0.0053 °day−1), intermediate in natural streams (−0.0087 °day−1), and high in channelized streams with macrophytes (−0.0136 °day−1).

    5. The shredder functional group ranged from 13 to 70% of the benthic community in the natural streams. Channelized streams had a more variable shredder population ranging from 0.5 to 80%. The highest values were found in channelized streams that had become colonized by macrophytes.

    6. There was a significant difference in total accumulated degree days between the channelized (256 °day) and natural woodland streams (209 °day). This is most likely an effect of drainage tiles contributing warmer groundwater to the channelized streams during fall.

    7. It is concluded that, contrary to the prevailing conceptual model of stream systems, decomposition rates and macroinvertebrate functions are not necessarily reduced in streams without riparian vegetation. The loss of the riparian canopy can stimulate emergent macrophytes which will provide autochthonous detritus for benthic communities. This will change benthic community structure and the life cycle strategies present.

  • 18.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Lannerstad, M
    The structure of the riparian ecotone and its implication for stream macroinvertebrate community2001In: International Association Of Theoretical And Applied Limnology, Vol 27, Pt 3, Proceedings, 2001, p. 1357-1360Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Pinay, G
    Fuglsang, A
    Ruffinoni, C
    Structure and function of buffer strips from a water-quality perspective in agricultural landscapes1995In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 31, no 1-3, p. 323-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Buffer strips can greatly improve the water quality of nearby agricultural streams by reducing nutrient leaching in groundwater and surface water runoff, even though they comprise little of the total catchment area. Hence, vegetated buffer zones located along streams and in the upland portions of the catchment can minimize erosion or trap sediments in surface runoff and thereby decrease phosphorus loading in surface water. For example, a buffer strip 10 m wide can reduce the phosphorus load, typically bound to sediment, by as much as 95%. Moreover, both natural and constructed riparian forests and wetlands may create conditions favorable for nitrogen transformation/removal by soil microbial processes such as denitrification, with as much as 100% of the nitrate being removed in these zones.

    In addition to nutrient removal, buffer strips will increase the diversity of flora and fauna in the otherwise monocultural landscape. The vegetation along the stream will also stabilize the stream banks and improve habitat for both fish and invertebrates within the stream.

  • 20. Wendt-Rasch, L
    et al.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Lunds universitet.
    Woin, P
    Effects of fenvalerate on the net-spinning behaviour of Hydropsyche siltalai (Dohler) (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae)1998In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 382, no 1-3, p. 53-61Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Whelan, M. J.
    et al.
    Van Egmond, R.
    Guymer, I.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Finnegan, C.
    Fox, K. K.
    Sparham, C.
    O'Connor, S.
    Vaughan, M.
    Pearson, J. M.
    The behaviour of linear alkyl benzene sulphonate under direct discharge conditions in Vientiane, Lao PDR2007In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 41, no 20, p. 4730-4740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct discharge of untreated sewage to surface waters is a common practice in many parts of the world. However, relatively little is known about the behaviour of synthetic organic pollutants under these conditions. This paper describes a sampling campaign designed to track changes in water quality in a surface water system in Vientiane (Lao PDR) receiving significant quantities of untreated waste water. The study was based on following in-channel transport using a fluorescent tracer injected as a pulse, with a focus on the anionic surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulphonate (LAS) and ammonia. Water samples were collected at a number of stations with sampling times estimated to coincide with solute time-of-travel. The reduction in LAS concentration with flow-time could be approximated by first-order kinetics with a half life of about 7 h. Free ammonia concentrations decreased more slowly than LAS and remained above the level believed to be toxic for sensitive aquatic species along the entire channel. Changes in the ratios of LAS alkyl chain homologues to total LAS concentrations suggest a preferential removal of longer chain lengths. The role of biodegradation in the removal of LAS was confirmed by the presence of LAS metabolites (sulphophenylcarboxylates, SPCs) which increased systematically (as a fraction of LAS remaining) with flow-time.

  • 22.
    Woodward, Guy
    et al.
    Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science, University College Cork.
    Gessner, Mark O.
    Department of Aquatic Ecology, Eawag.
    Giller, Paul S.
    Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science, University College Cork.
    Gulis, Vladislav
    Institute of Marine Research (IMAR) and Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra.
    Hladyz, Sally
    Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science, University College Cork.
    Lecerf, Antoine
    Université de Toulouse.
    Malmqvist, Björn
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    McKie, Brendan G.
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Tiegs, Scott D.
    Department of Aquatic Ecology, Eawag.
    Cariss, Helen
    Department of Environmental and Geographical Sciences, Manchester Metropolitan University.
    Dobson, Mike
    Department of Environmental and Geographical Sciences, Manchester Metropolitan University.
    Elosegi, Arturo
    Department of Plant Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country, Bilbao.
    Ferreira, Verónica
    Institute of Marine Research (IMAR) and Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra.
    Graça, Manuel A.S.
    Institute of Marine Research (IMAR) and Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra.
    Fleituch, Tadeusz
    Institute of Nature Conservation, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków.
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Nistorescu, Marius
    Department of Systems Ecology and Sustainability, University of Bucharest.
    Pozo, Jesús
    Department of Plant Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country, Bilbao.
    Risnoveanu, Geta
    Department of Systems Ecology and Sustainability, University of Bucharest.
    Schindler, Markus
    Department of Aquatic Ecology, Eawag.
    Vadineanu, Angheluta
    Department of Systems Ecology and Sustainability, University of Bucharest.
    Vought, Lena B. M.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Chauvet, Eric
    Université de Toulouse.
    Continental-scale effects of nutrient pollution on stream ecosystem functioning2012In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 336, no 6087, p. 1438-1440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excessive nutrient loading is a major threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide that leads to profound changes in aquatic biodiversity and biogeochemical processes. Systematic quantitative assessment of functional ecosystem measures for river networks is, however, lacking, especially at continental scales. Here, we narrow this gap by means of a pan-European field experiment on a fundamental ecosystem process—leaf-litter breakdown—in 100 streams across a greater than 1000-fold nutrient gradient. Dramatically slowed breakdown at both extremes of the gradient indicated strong nutrient limitation in unaffected systems, potential for strong stimulation in moderately altered systems, and inhibition in highly polluted streams. This large-scale response pattern emphasizes the need to complement established structural approaches (such as water chemistry, hydrogeomorphology, and biological diversity metrics) with functional measures (such as litter-breakdown rate, whole-system metabolism, and nutrient spiraling) for assessing ecosystem health.

1 - 22 of 22
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