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  • 1.
    Clausson, Eva
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Evaluation of models for health supportive family conversation intended to turn a negative weight development in preschool children2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Obesity in children is a growing health problem in the world. In Sweden, 14-15 percent of 4-year-old children are overweight and 3 percent are obese. Prevention of overweight and obesity is most effective if started as early as possible. Studies have shown the need for involving the family since parents’/guardians’ attitudes and beliefs may be crucial for the development of the child's eating habits and have thus a key role in the preventive work regarding a healthy lifestyle for the children. In Sweden, the Child Health Service (CHS) comprises a comprehensive universal nurse-led CHS program with health surveillance directed to the children and their parents, including parental support. The CHS have the opportunity to pay attention to early development of overweight and implement measures that can contribute to a healthy lifestyle during childhood as well as adulthood. The need for evidence based methods/models to be used in combating child overweight and obesity is obvious. However, there is a lack of evidence based models to prevent the prevailing childhood obesity used by clinical active nurses.

    Purpose: The overall purpose is to evaluate models for health supportive family conversations to families with preschool children with the intent to turn a negative weight development.

    Method: The study has a longitudinal design with health supportive family conversations being evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. A strategic sample will be applied on CHS centers from different socioeconomic areas in the southern part of Sweden. The models that will be used are the Calgary Family Assessment Model (CFAM) and The Calgary Family Intervention Model (CFIM). The models have its their theoretical foundation in e.g. theories of systems, communication, and change. The study will have a naturalistic approach with a pre-posttest design in which nurses in CHS are trained in the model for health supportive family conversations. Supervision will be provided during the intervention. Children’s IsoBMI and The Lifestyle Behavior Checklist will be used as pre- and post-test and at the 12 month follow-up. Evaluation interviews will be held with the families and the nurses separately.

    Preliminary results: A pilot interview showed that the health supportive family conversations led to increased knowledge and understanding about the family lifestyles related to the child obesity. Involvement of the family lead to a consciousness within the family about ingredients in sweet drinks and food. The fact that the CHS nurse was the one who conducted the conversations were of great importance, since the nurse was well known to the family.

  • 2.
    Edfors, Ellinor
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön PRO-CARE.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön PRO-CARE.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön PRO-CARE.
    Forskning, Utbildning & Samverkan i Sjuksköterskeutbildningen (FUSS): studentmedverkan i forskning under verksamhetsförlagd utbildning2011Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Hagell, Peter
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Edfors, Ellinor
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Oral hälsa och folkhälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Sjödahl Hammarlund, Catharina
    Lund University.
    Group concept mapping for evaluation and development in nursing education2016In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 20, p. 147-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The value of course evaluations has been debated since they frequently fail to capture the complexity of education and learning. Group Concept Mapping (GCM), a participant-centred mixed-method was explored as a tool for evaluation and development in nursing education and to better understand students' learning experiences, using data from a GCM-based evaluation of a research training assignment integrating clinical practice and research data collection within a Swedish university nursing program. Student nurses (n = 47) participated in a one-day GCM exercise. Focus group brainstorming regarding experiences from the assignment that the students considered important and instructive yielded 98 statements that were individually sorted based on their student-perceived relationships, and rated regarding their importance/instructiveness and need for development. Quantitative analysis of sort data produced a 2-dimensional map representing their conceptual relationships, and eight conceptual areas. Average cluster ratings were plotted relative to each other and provided a decision aid for development and planning by identifying areas (i.e., "Research methodology", "Patients' perspectives", and "Interviewer role") considered highly important/instructive and in high need for development. These experiences illustrate the use and potential of GCM as an interactive participant-centred approach to evaluation, planning and development in nursing and other higher health science educations.

  • 4.
    Hedin, Gita
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Norell-Clarke, Annika
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Garmy, Pernilla
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Adolescent´s experiences of sleep and electronic media use2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Hedin, Gita
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Norell-Clarke, Annika
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Garmy, Pernilla
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Adolescent´s experiences of sleep and electronic media use2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Edfors, Ellinor
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Improving nursing students research knowledge through participation in a study about nutrition, its associated factors and assessment2013In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 3, no 8, p. 50-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aims of this study were threefold: 1) to explore nursing students perceptions of knowledge development after participating in an actual research project; 2) to explore undernutrition and its relationship to other clinical factors; 3) to explore the user-friendliness of the Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form (MEONF-II) in relation to dependency in Activities of Daily Living (ADL).

    Methods: A pilot study (Study 1, S1) was conducted in October 2010, including 281 patients. After extending the research protocol a second data collection (S2) was conducted in March 2011, including 236 patients (total n=517). First and third year nursing students (n=188) collected the data, during one day of their clinical practice courses by assessing three patients each in hospitals or nursing homes. Students answered questions about their experiences from participating in the study. Patient related assessments included: MEONF-II; ADL dependency (S1 and S2); insomnia; low-spiritedness; and subjective health (S2). In addition, questions about the user-friendliness of MEONF-II were included (S1 and S2).

    Results: Among the nursing students, 51% experienced that their knowledge about nutrition increased and 67% that their understanding for research increased by participating in the project. Out of the patients, 57% were women, 50% were almost independent, 27% had some dependency, 23% were almost totally dependent in ADL, and 48% were at moderate/ high undernutrition risk. In S2, 32% of patients had insomnia, and 46% experienced low-spiritedness. Dependency in 5-6 and 3-4 ADLs (OR, 2.439 and 2.057, respectively), compared to dependency in 0-2 ADLs, were the strongest predictors for undernutrition risk, followed by insomnia (OR 2.124). Nursing students experienced the MEONF-II as easy to understand (93%), easy to answer (94%) and relevant (94%), and the suggestions for measures to take in case of risk as relevant (95%), independent of the patients’ ADL status.

    Conclusions: By participating in an actual research project nursing students gets an understanding for research and tools for working with quality improvements in their future role as professional nurses. Undernutrition, mental and physical factors constitute coexisting problems in need for further investigation. Nursing students perceive the MEONF-II as user-friendly, independent of patient ADL dependency.

  • 7.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Edfors, Ellinor
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education.
    Norberg, Erika
    Central Hospital Kristianstad.
    Stubbendorff, Anna
    County Council Skane.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Oral hälsa och folkhälsovetenskap.
    Wetterstrand, Martin
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education.
    Long-term effects of a computer-based nutritional training program for inpatient hospital care2017In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 797-802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale

    A previous short-term study showed that a computer-based training in eating and nutrition increased the probability for hospital inpatients at undernutrition (UN) risk to receive nutritional treatment and care without increasing overtreatment (providing nutritional treatment to those not at UN risk).

    The aim of this study was to investigate if a computer-based training in eating and nutrition influences the precision in nutritional treatment and care in a longer-term perspective.

    Method

    A preintervention and postintervention study was conducted with a cross-sectional design at each time points (baseline and 7 months postintervention). Hospital inpatients > 18 years old at baseline (2013; n = 201) and follow-up (2014; n = 209) were included. A computer-based training was implemented during a period of 3 months with 297 (84%) participating registered nurses and nurse assistants. Undernutrition risk was screened for using the minimal eating observation and nutrition form-version II. Nutritional treatment and care was recorded using a standardized protocol.

    Results

    The share of patients at UN risk that received energy-dense food (+ 25.2%) and dietician consultations (+ 22.3%) increased between baseline and follow-up, while fewer received oral nutritional supplements (-18.9%). "Overtreatment" (providing nutritional treatment to those not at UN risk) did not change between baseline and follow-up.

    Conclusion

    The computer-based training increased the provision of energy-dense food and dietician consultations to patients at UN risk without increasing overtreatment of patients without UN risk.

  • 8.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Edfors, Ellinor
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education.
    Norberg, Erika
    Central Hospital Kristianstad.
    Stubbendorff, Anna
    The County Council of Skåne.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education.
    Wetterstrand, Martin
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Short-term effects of a computer-based nutritional nursing training program for inpatient hospital care2016In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 799-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RATIONALE: This study aimed to explore whether a computer-based training in eating and nutrition for hospital nursing staff can influence the precision in nutritional treatment and care.

    METHOD: A pre-intervention and post-intervention study was conducted with a cross-sectional design at each time point. The settings were one intervention (IH) and two control hospitals (CH1 and CH2). Hospital inpatients >18 years old at baseline (2012; n = 409) and follow-up (2014; n = 456) were included. The computer-based training was implemented during a period of 3 months in the IH with 297 (84%) participating registered nurses and nurse assistants. Nutritional risk was screened for using the Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form. Nutritional treatment and care was recorded using a standardized protocol RESULTS: In the IH, there was an increase in the share of patients at UN risk that received energy-dense food (+16.7%) and dietician consultations (+17.3%) between baseline and follow-up, while fewer received feeding assistance (-16.2%). There was an increase in the share of patients at UN risk that received energy-dense food (+19.5%), a decrease in oral nutritional supplements (-30.5%) and food-registrations (-30.6%) in CH1, whereas there were no changes in CH2. 'Overtreatment' (providing nutritional treatment to those not at UN risk) was significantly higher in CH2 (52.7%) than in CH1 (14.3%) and in the IH (25.2%) at follow-up.

    CONCLUSION: The computer-based training seemed to increase the probability for patients at UN risk in the IH to receive nutritional treatment without increasing overtreatment.

  • 9.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Smärta: en studie genomförd med hjälp från studenter i sjuksköterskeprogrammet2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syfte: Syftet med studien var att undersöka förekomst och grad av smärta hos vårdtagare och att jämföra två metoder för skattning av smärta, verbal skattning av smärta samt skattning med hjälp av VAS (Visuell Analog Skala). Vidare är syftet att sjuksköterskestudenterna ska få träna sig med hjälp av olika bedömningsinstrument identifiera problem med smärta samt reflektera över Metod: Sjuksköterskestudenter från första och sista året i utbildningen genomförde skattningar på vårdtagare vid den praktikplats där de genomförde sin verksamhetsförlagda utbildning (VFU) på sjukhus eller i särskilda boenden (SB, här även inkluderat avancerad sjukvård i hemmet (ASIH)). Vårdtagare gav sitt informerade samtycke till att medverka i studien som genomfördes under en dag. Vårdtagarna fick skatta sin smärta med verbal skattning samt med VAS. Totalt ingick 1769 vårdtagare i studien varav 1432 var på sjukhus och 1337 i SB/ASIH. På sjukhus var 54.3% kvinnor och 45.7% män, inom SB/ASIH var fördelningen 63.8% respektive 35.9%.

    Resultat: På sjukhus upplevde 48.4% av respondenterna sin grad av sjukdom som "svår" respektive 30.1% vid SB/ASIH. Vid sjukhus angav 27.8% någon form av smärta när den "var som värst", respektive 31.8% vid SB/ASIH. När smärtan "var som minst" var det 39.9% vid sjukhus som uppgav "ingen smärta" och inom SB/ASIH var det 43.1%. Vad gäller smärta "i genomsnitt" var det 22.1% som uppgav "ingen smärta" vid sjukhus, och 22.3% vid SB/ASIH.

    Slutsats: Smärta var väldigt vanligt både på sjukhus och i SB/ASIH.

  • 10.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön PRO-CARE.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön PRO-CARE.
    Användarvänlighet för Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form (MEONF-ll): en pilotstudie genomförd med hjälp av studenter på sjuksköterskeprogrammet2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to make a screening of risk for malnutrition among persons in hospitals and among those living in special accommondation (long-term care).

    Method: Nurse student collected the data during their clinical education at hospitals and in the special accommodations in 2010. Staff and clinical teachers participated also with the data collection. By participating in the study the students got training in how to provide information to the staff and patients/residents, collect data, and compile results ant to give feed-back about the findings to the department. The screening of risk for malnutrition was done using Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition (MEONF) and Active Daily Life (ADL). Each student asked three patients/residents to participate, in the study.

    Results: A total of 266 patients/residents who received ADL-status assessed. 45% of respondents were next independent/dependent on the help of more than 2 ADL-functions, 26% were partially dependent on help in 3-4 ADL-functions and 25% were almost completely dependent on help in 5-6 ADL-functions. The results (Table 2) show that the respondents has no/low risk of malnutrition, they were almost completely independent/dependent in aid. In the case of those respondents with a high risk for portable so it was no more (39%) witch was almost entirely dependent on aid. The majority of students believe that assessment-manual were easy to understand, that the proposed measurement were easy and relevant regardless of which group the patients/residents belonged.

    Conclusion: The patients/residents who had high risk for malnutrition had even greater need of help. One group that must not be overlooked is the patients/residents who are obese but still high risk of malnutrition. Assessment instruments seem to be useful and easy to use. For the students perceived it as positive to participate in actual research projects.

     

     

     

  • 11.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Do study circles and a nutritional care policy improve nutritional care in a short- and long-term perspective in special accommodations?2010In: Food & nutrition research, ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 54, p. 5402-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study circles give positive short-term effects and a NCP gives positive short- and long-term effects on NC. Whether a combination of study circles and the implementation of a NCP can give even better results is an area for future studies.

  • 12.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Fallriskbedömning: med Downton Fallrisk Index: n studie genomförd med hjälp av studenter på sjuksköterskeprogrammet2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to make an assessment of fall risk among persons in hospitals and among those living in special accommodation (long-term care).

    Method: Nurse students collected the data during their clinical education at hospitals and in special accommodations in 2008 and 2010. Staff and clinical teachers participated also with the data collection. By participating in the study the students got training in how to provide information to the staff and patients/residents, collect data, and compile results and to give feed-back about the findings to the department. The assessment of fall risk was done using the Downton Fallrisk Index (risk of fall >3 points). Both years all patients/residents were there were nurse students were asked to participate, in the study.

    Results: In the entire sample the prevalence of fall risk in year 2008 was 73% an in year 2010 was 69%. The mean score in the Downton Fallrisk Index in year 2008 was 3,7 and in year 2010 it was 3,5. At the hospitals in year 2008 and 2010 it was 66% and 58% respectively that had risk of fall while the corresponding prevalence in the special accommodations was 86% and 85%. The average time to carry out the assessment of fall risk was 10 minutes (median). The majority of the students agreed that the questions in Downton were relevant, easy to understand and that the answer alternatives also were easy to understand.

    The majority of the students 2008 and 2010 (2008, course 6: 76% respectively course 16: 65% and in 2010, course 6: 38% respectively course 16: 61%) stated that they received better scientific-knowledge, through participating in the study. It is of importance too note that the course 6 students in 2010 did not receive any verbal information before the study, which probably negatively influenced the experience of contributing in the study.

    Conclusion: In special accommodations the prevalence of fall was higher than in hospitals. The Downton Fallrisk Index seems to bee a useful and simple instrument to use. In general the nursing students experience is positive to participate in a real research project. However, a pre-requisite for the positive experiences from participating is most likely that they get, verbal information goof before participating in the study.

  • 13.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Förebyggande och uppsökande verksamhet: Osby kommun2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim with this report is to explore differences between home living men and women, younger (79 years or younger) and older elderly (80 years or older) that got a preventive home visit.

    Methods: In the fall 2007 one municipality started up with preventive home visits. Elderly persons are visited by district nurses to register and discuss the elderly persons perceived health, medications, living circumstances and social activities. At the same time a checklist is used to access preventive measures taken with respect to fall risk. From year 2010 also a form is used to assess the risk for malnutrition.

    Results: In total 1203 preventive home visits has been made to older persons with a mean age of 81.7 years, 56% women, and 44% men. In comparisons between men and women it was found that men were more dependent in washing, cooking and cleaning. Women perceived their state of health as worse, they had more problems with vision and more pain than men. Women were more physically active than men. More men hade problems hearing. Women were less satisfied with their situation, more tired, more often dejected, felt more worries/anxiety, and had poorer sleep. But, women had more contact with others (by visits/by phone) than men had. Women had more difficulties with mobility-tiredness and more had risk for falling (46.5%, men 39.8%). More women had also made adjustments in their homes to prevent falls. In total 218 persons had been assessed regarding the risk for malnutrition and significantly more women were at risk (82.8% versus men 58.4%). More needs were also identified during the preventive home visits for the women than for the men. In comparison between the younger and the older persons there were more needs for help i daily activities, poorer health, more vision- and hearing problems, less satisfaction with their circumstances, and more tiredness among the older persons. But, the oldest persons had better sleep and more visits from others (or that people called them). It was less persons in the older group that had a permanent contact with a doctor, more used medications and more had problems with mobility-tiredness, and more had fall risk (34.7% among the youngest and 51.0% in the oldest age group). Accordingly more preventive actions had been taken among the oldest persons to prevent falling. More needs were also identified during the preventive home visits for the oldest age group than for the youngest. Out of the 218 persons (all of whom were 79 years or younger) that had been assessed regarding the risk for malnutrition it was 70.5% that had such a risk. In total more persons wanted to, if the need arise, to get continued care and service in their own home. 

    Conclusion: In general women and the oldest (80 years or over) had more physical and psychological health problems than men and the youngest (79 years or under). Thus, women and the oldest are special risk groups. It was also in these groups most needs were identified during the preventive home visits. Risk for malnutrition seems to be an extensive problem among the home living elderly, this needs special attention during the preventive home visits.

  • 14.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Nutrition: förekomsten av ätsvårigheter och undernäring: en studie genomförd med hjälp av studenter på sjuksköterskeprogrammetåren 2005, 2007 och 20092010Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of eating difficulties and malnutrition among persons in hospitals and among those living in special accommodations (long-term care). In addition the aim was to, within special accommodations, explore how different interventions could affect the precision in nutritional care and the occurrence of underweight/overweight, both from a short as well as a long-term perspective.

    Methods: Nurse students collected the data during their clinical education at hospitals and in special accommodations in years 2005, 2007, and 2009. Staff and clinical teachers participated also with the data collection. By participating in the study the students got training in how to provide information to the staff and patients/residents, collect data, and compile results and to give feed-back about the findings to the department. Underweight and overweight was assessed from BMI. Undernutrition risk was assessed based on: unintentional weight loss, low BMI, and/or the occurrence of eating difficulties. Assessments were also made regarding what nutritional care the care recipients got. In the special accommodations interventions with study circles (two municipalities), nutritional care policy (one municipality) and in four municipalities no specific intervention was made. The prevalence of overweight was 39-42%.

    Results: In hospitals the prevalence of moderate/high undernutrition risk was 27-28% and if also those with little risk were included the prevalence was 60-63%. Between 4-7% were provided with protein- and energy enriched food, 25-30% got oral supplements or similar and 12-13% needed eating assistance.

    In special accommodations the prevalence of moderate/high undernutrition risk was 27-35% and if also those with little risk were included the prevalence was 65-70%. The prevalence og overweight was 30-33%. Between 4-14% were provided with protein- and energy enriched food, 11-19% got oral supplements or similar and 47-50% needed eating assistance. Within the special accommodations it was shown that the intervention with study circles lead to improvements in the precision of nutritional care (protein- and energy enriched food and/or oral supplements) and a lower prevalence of underweight was seen, at least shortly after that the intervention was finished. In the same way the anchoring and implementation of the nutritional care policy resulted in improvement in the nutritional care. These improvements remained however also a long time after the implementation. 

    Most of the students (81%) experienced that they did get better understanding for research by participating in the study, more than half (53%) thought that their interest in assessment of eating and nutrition increased and 67% that their knowledge about eating and nutrition increased.

    Conclusion: Many patients and residents are at risk of becoming undernourished. This demands that adequate measures are taken to prevent or treat undernutrition. Such measures can be protein- and energy-dense food and oral supplements or similar. In the special accommodations can study circles for the staff lead to improvements in the nutritional care for more residents in a short-term perspective and by implementing a nutritional care policy also long-term positive effects are likely to be achieved. Combining study circles with implementation of nutritional care policies can be the focus for new studies.

    In general the nursing students experience it as positive to participate in a real research project.

     

  • 15.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Undernäring, övervikt och relationer till aktiviteter i dagligt liv: en studie genomförd med hjälp från studenter i sjuksköterskeprogrammet2011Report (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University College, School of Health and Society.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University College, School of Health and Society.
    Axelsson, Carolina
    Kristianstad University College, School of Teacher Education.
    Långvarig och akut smärta: hos patienter och boende: en studie genomförd av studenter på sjuksköterskeprogrammet2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to map out pain and pain treatment among patients in hospitals and persons in special accommodations as well as in ordinary living.

    Method: Nurse students collected the data during their clinical education at hospitals and in special accommodations or in ordinary living. Also the clinical teachers helped out with supporting the students during data collection. The students made assessments of pain where they had their clinical practice during the spring 2009. The students got, though collecting data, a training in how to provide information to the staff and patients/residents, compile results and to give feed-back about the findings to the department. The study was not conducted as a total survey, in other words was a selection of respondents that were included in the results.

    Results: In total 419 assessments of pain was made and 35% of respondents reported long standing pain and 14% reported acute pain. The respondents with long standing pain were older (76 years and 69 years respectively), more women (67% and 53% respectively) and more were in special accommodations or in ordinary living (37% and 17% respectively) than among those with acute pain. The respondents with acute pain more often agreed with that the staff asked about if he/she had pain (84% and 73% respective) while the respondents with long standing pain to a greater extent agreed with that they tried to hide their own pain (acute pain: 43% resp. long standing pain: 59%). The most common strategies to handle the pain among those with acute pain was to ask for something to alleviate the pain (84%), lie down and rest (78%) or to try thinking on something else (64%) while it among those with long standing pain was to lie down and rest (83%), ask for something to alleviate the pain (73%) or to try thinking on something else (70%). Of the students that collected the data and reported the findings to the staff 51 also evaluated their participation in the study. Of these, 74% experienced that their understanding for research increased, 51% that their interest för pain assessment had increased and 55% that their knowledge about pain had increased.

     Conclusion:

    Long standing pain was most common among women and elderly persons. The strategies used among the participants for making staff aware about the pain, and the strategies to handle once own pain differed depending on weather the pain was acute or long standing. Participating in the data collection and other research activities has a positive effect for nursing students understanding for research and to some extent for their interest in the area under study.

  • 17.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I.
    10 år med forskargruppen PRO-CARE: jubileumsskrift2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Lindgren, Emma
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Gångsvårigheter, tilltro till balansförmåga, fallrisk och relaterade faktorer på sjukhus och i särskilt boende: en studie genomförd med hjälp från studenter i sjuksköterskeprogrammet2013Report (Other academic)
1 - 18 of 18
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