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  • 1.
    Arzel, Céline
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Guillemain, M.
    CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Ecology of spring-migrating Anatidae: a review2006In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 147, no 2, p. 167-184Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spring migration is generally considered as a crucial period of the year for many birds, not the least due to its supposed importance for subsequent breeding success. By reviewing the existing literature for Anatidae (ducks, geese, and swans), we show that little is known about their ecology in spring, although some goose species are exceptions. Another general pattern is that the ecology of Anatidae at staging sites is particularly neglected. Existing studies tend to focus on questions dealing with acquisition of nutrient reserves, whereas almost nothing has been published about stopover habitats, time use, microhabitat use, foraging behaviour, food availability, food limitation, diet selection, and interspecific relationships. Besides summarising present knowledge, we identify taxonomic groups and topics for which gaps of knowledge appear the most evident, thereby also highlighting research needs for the future.

  • 2.
    Arzel, Céline
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Lepley, Michel
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Bosca, Fabrice
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Legagneux, Pierre
    CEBC, CNRS UPR 1934 Villiers-en-Bois, Beauvoir sur Niort.
    Nogues, Jean-Baptiste
    Les Amis des Marais du Vigueirat, Mas Thibert, Arles.
    A flyway perspective on food resource abundance in a long-distance migrant, the Eurasian teal (Anas crecca)2009In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 150, no 1, p. 61-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two frequent assumptions about the evolution of long-distance migration in birds are that they travel long distances annually to reach food-rich areas for breeding, and that they time their migratory journey to be at staging sites when the latter provide the best feeding conditions. These assumptions have rarely been properly tested, and there is no study in which a species’ major food types have been measured by standardized methods throughout a flyway and over a large part of the year. We here present such data for Eurasian teal (Anas crecca), converted to a common energetic currency, and collected at wintering, spring staging and breeding sites. Teal did not time migration to maximize local food abundance; most birds left wintering and spring staging sites before a sharp increase in invertebrate food abundance occurred. On the other hand, hatching of ducklings coincided with a peak in invertebrate food abundance on boreal breeding lakes. Mean overall food abundance (invertebrates and seeds combined) did not differ between wintering sites in southern France and breeding sites in northern Sweden at the time of breeding. Our results are inconsistent with the hypothesis that long-distance migration in dabbling ducks has evolved because adult birds gain an immediate pay-off in increased food abundance by flying north in spring. However, our data confirm a selective advantage for breeding at higher latitudes, because hatching of ducklings may coincide with a peak in invertebrate emergence and because longer days may increase the duration of efficient foraging.

  • 3.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Hessel, Rebecca
    Fox, Anthony David
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Dalby, Lars
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Interpreting seasonal range shifts in migratory birds: a critical assessment of 'short-stopping' and a suggested terminology2014In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 155, no 3, p. 571-579Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term 'short-stopping' is increasingly used in ecology to describe spatio-temporal changes in occurrence of migratory species. Spurred by the insight that it has been used in a variety of contexts, we reviewed its use in avian ecology. A literature search yielded 59 papers explicitly treating short-stopping in birds, most of them in peer-reviewed journals. The term was first used in 1967 to describe a northward shift in wintering Canada Geese in North America and has been used with increasing frequency to the present day. Geese dominate the short-stopping literature, which is confined to the northern hemisphere. Short-stopping has been used to describe (1) a shortened autumn migration that results in a wintering distribution closer to breeding areas, (2) a shortened spring migration that results in a breeding distribution closer to wintering areas, and (3) a delay in autumn migration that leads to a perceived reduced abundance in some part of the winter range. We advocate that short-stopping should be used only to describe (1) range shifts that involve shortening of the migratory corridor, and that they are qualified explicitly by season (i.e. breeding/winter) and degree (i.e. full or partial range shift). In other cases of breeding, wintering or entire range shifts where the migratory corridor is elongated or remains the same, we recommend using the term 'range shift', qualified by season, geography and orientation (i.e. the direction of the range shift). We also discuss the need for spatially explicit avian count monitoring mechanisms (rather than capture-recapture or hunting bag data) designed specifically to track such changes in distribution in the future.

  • 4.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    et al.
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice , La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Arzel, Céline
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Legagneux, Pierre
    Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS UPR 1934, Beauvoir sur Niort.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Fritz, Hervé
    Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS UPR 1934, Beauvoir sur Niort.
    Lepley, Michel
    Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Pin, Christophe
    Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Arnaud, Antoine
    Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Massez, Grégoire
    Les Marais du Vigueirat, Mas Thibert, Arles.
    Risky foraging leads to cost-free mate guarding in male teal Anas crecca2007In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 148, no 2, p. 251-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mate guarding by males is common in species with long-lasting pair bonds. We tested if the need to guard females affected foraging depth in male teal (Anas crecca), and if they were more vigilant than females when foraging with submerged eyes (preventing monitoring of competing males and predators). These predictions were not supported, suggesting that foraging depth selection is primarily driven by other factors, presumably food related. A likely reason why deeply foraging males did not increase vigilance is that 37.5% of the foraging time was already dedicated to it. The apparent lack of guarding costs in foraging male teal may explain why such small ducks can maintain pair bonds for up to 7 months.

  • 5.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Ottvall, Richard
    Department of Ecology, Lund University.
    Smith, Henrik
    Department of Ecology, Lund University.
    Body mass changes in a biparental incubator: the Redshank Tringa totanus2010In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 151, no 1, p. 179-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incubation is a period of high energetic costs and accordingly body mass losses are often detected. Why birds lose body mass during incubation is not well understood; suggestions are that it is either a consequence of energetic constraints or adaptations to an optimal mass trajectory. We studied body mass changes through the incubation period in the Common Redshank Tringa totanus, a biparental incubator, on southern Gotland in the Baltic Sea. In contrast to what has been found in other biparental incubators, body mass of both sexes decreased linearly through the incubation period. The estimated mean body mass loss was 6.7 g (SE 1.7), corresponding to ca. 5% of initial body mass at incubation start. Hatching success in males was not related to body mass and size. In contrast, reproductive success, measured as successful production of fledged juveniles, in males was negatively related to body mass during incubation and positively related to body size. This finding supports the theory that body mass loss might follow an optimal mass trajectory, possibly to increase agility through the chick-rearing stage. However, energy constraints causing body mass loss cannot be ruled out; in fact, it is not unlikely that body mass may change due to a combination of both adaptation and stress.

  • 6.
    Pöysä, Hannu
    et al.
    Finland.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Holopainen, Sari
    Finland.
    Nummi, Petri
    Finland.
    Kjell, Sjöberg
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Recovering Whooper Swans do not cause a decline in Eurasian Wigeon via their grazing impact on habitat2018In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 159, p. 447-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Whooper Swan (Cygnus cygnus) is a good example of successful conservation, with rapidly growing numbers in Fennoscandia in recent decades. To the contrary, Eurasian Wigeon (Mareca penelope) shows a strong negative trend in breeding numbers, which raises conservation concerns. Previous research suggests a causal link between recent population trajectories of the two species. Both preferentially breed on wetlands with abundant horsetail (Equisetum spp.), a plant providing food for Whooper Swan and crucial feeding microhabitat for Eurasian Wigeon broods. We here test predictions based on the hypothesis that grazing on Equisetum by Whooper Swan reduces breeding habitat or breeding habitat quality for Eurasian Wigeon. We use data from 60 lakes in which waterfowl were counted in 1990–1991 and 2016, and Equisetum was mapped in 1990–1991 and 2013–2014. Lakes colonized by Whooper Swan typically had more abundant Equisetum vegetation in the past than lakes not colonized. Lake-specific decrease of Equisetum was not associated with colonization by Whooper Swan. The number of lakes occupied by Eurasian Wigeon decreased, but the decrease was not stronger on lakes colonized by Whooper Swan than on those that were not. Contrary to our prediction, current Eurasian Wigeon abundance was positively associated with Whooper Swan abundance. Moreover, Eurasian Wigeon did not decrease more on lakes from which Equisetum disappeared than on lakes in which there was still Equisetum left. This study does not support the idea that Whooper Swan affects Eurasian Wigeon negatively by grazing on Equisetum.

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  • en-US
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  • Other locale
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