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  • 1.
    Bolejko, Anetta
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital Malmö.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö University.
    Zackrisson, Sophia
    Skåne University Hospital Malmö.
    Prevalence, long-term development, and predictors of psychosocial consequences of false-positive mammography among women attending population-based screening2015In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1388-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cancer screening aims to detect cancer at an asymptomatic stage, although side effects from screening also occur. We investigated the prevalence, longitudinal development, and predictors of psychosocial consequences of false-positive breast cancer screening.

    METHODS: Three hundred ninety-nine women with false-positive screening mammography responded to the Consequences of Screening-Breast Cancer (COS-BC) questionnaire immediately after a negative diagnosis (free from breast cancer) following recall examination(s) (baseline), and 6 and 12 months later. Age-matched controls (n = 499) with a negative mammogram responded to the COS-BC at the same occasions. Five COS-BC scales (Sense of dejection, Anxiety, Behavioral, Sleep, and Existential values) were used as outcome measures.

    RESULTS: Women with false-positive mammography had consistently higher prevalence of all five consequences compared with controls (P < 0.001). The prevalences decreased between baseline and 6 months (P < 0.001) but were stable between 6 and 12 months (P ≥ 0.136). Early recall profoundly predicted long-term consequences for all five outcomes (OR, 3.05-10.31), along with dissatisfaction with information at recall (OR, 2.28-2.56), being foreign-born (OR, 2.35-3.71), and lack of social support (OR, 1.13-1.25).

    CONCLUSION: This 1-year longitudinal study shows that women experience psychosocial consequences of false-positive screening mammography. Early recall should be performed cautiously, and provision of information as well as social support may reduce psychosocial consequences.

    IMPACT: Although delivery of population-based screening reduces breast cancer mortality, it also raises the issue of its impact on the psychosocial well-being of healthy women. Our findings identify predictors that can be targeted in future efforts to reduce the side effects of mammographic screening.

  • 2. Xu, Xing
    et al.
    Valtonen-André, Camilla
    Sävblom, Charlotta
    Halldén, Christer
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry, Lund University.
    Lilja, Hans
    Klein, Robert J.
    Polymorphisms at the Microseminoprotein-beta locus associated with physiologic variation in beta-microseminoprotein and prostate-specific antigen levels2010In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 2035-2042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: rs10993994, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the genetic locus encoding β-microseminoprotein (β-MSP), is associated with both prostate cancer risk and levels of blood prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker used in prostate cancer screening. Therefore, we wished to determine the association between SNPs at MSMB, the gene encoding β-MSP, and the levels of prostate-produced biomarkers β-MSP, PSA, and human kallikrein 2 (hK2) in blood and semen.

    Methods: Blood and semen from 304 healthy young Swedish men (ages 18-21) were assayed for β-MSP, PSA, and hK2. SNPs around MSMB were genotyped from matched DNA and analyzed for quantitative association with biomarker levels. Empirical P values were multiple test–corrected and the independence of each SNP's effect was determined.

    Results: rs10993994 was significantly associated with the blood and semen levels of β-MSP (both P < 1.0 × 10−7) and PSA (P = 0.00014 and P = 0.0019), and semen levels of hK2 (P = 0.00027). Additional copies of the prostate cancer risk allele resulted in lower β-MSP but higher PSA levels, and singly explained 23% and 5% of the variation seen in semen β-MSP and PSA, respectively. Additional SNPs at MSMB are associated with β-MSP and PSA independently of rs10993994.

    Conclusions: SNPs at MSMB correlate with physiologic variation in β-MSP and PSA levels in the blood and semen of healthy young Swedish men. In particular, rs10993994 has a strong effect on β-MSP levels.

    Impact: Our results suggest a mechanism by which rs10993994 might predispose to prostate cancer and raise the possibility that genetic variation might need to be considered in interpreting the levels of these biomarkers.

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