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  • 1.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Persson, Dennis
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Hagell, Peter
    Rasch analysis of an instrument for measuring occupational value: implications for theory and practice2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 118-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated psychometric properties of an instrument for assessing perceived occupational value, the 26-item OVal-pd. Data from 225 Swedish subjects with and without known mental illness were analysed regarding fit to the Rasch measurement model (partial credit model), differential item functioning (DIF), and functioning of the OVal-pd four-category response scale. The reliability (index of person separation, analogous to Cronbach's alpha) was good (0.92) but there were signs of overall and item level (six items) misfit. There was DIF between people with and without mental illness for three items. Iterative deletion of misfitting items resulted in a new 18-item DIF-free scale with good overall and individual item fit and maintained reliability (0.91). There were no disordered response category thresholds. These observations also held true in separate analyses among people with and without mental illness. Thus, the first steps of ensuring that occupational value can be measured in a valid and reliable way have been taken. Still, occupational value is a dynamic construct and the aspects that fit the construct may vary between contexts. This has implications for, e.g., cross-cultural research and calls for identification of a core set of culture-free items to allow for valid cross-cultural comparisons.

  • 2.
    Håkansson, Carita
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping universitet.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Construct validity of a revised version of the occupational balance questionnaire2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Occupational balance is fundamental to occupational therapy and occupational science. Therefore, the Occupational Balance Questionnaire (OBQ) was developed and has previously been found psychometrically valid according to classical test theory. Aim: To investigate the internal construct validity of the OBQ using Rasch measurement theory. Material and methods: Data from two general population samples were used to investigate the psychometric properties of the OBQ according to Rasch measurement theory. Results: The analyses identified problems with the current response scale and multidimensionality of two items. As a result, a revised version, the OBQ11, was suggested and exhibited response categories that worked properly, good reliability (0.92), model fit and measurement invariance across age and gender groups. The hierarchical item ordering was in agreement with previous research. Conclusion: The new OBQ11 satisfies the measurement criteria defined by the Rasch model. However, further studies of additional samples are needed to validate its generic properties. Significance: The purpose of the OBQ11 is to measure occupational balance of individuals or groups, and to identify aspects of occupational balance in need of improvement. Our observations suggest that the OBQ11 is a valid and promising complement to other instruments.

  • 3.
    Orban, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Using a time-geographical diary method in order to facilitate reflections on changes in patterns of daily occupations2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 249-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective and methods: Time-use methodologies have been proposed to be established research techniques when exploring aspects of daily occupations. In this study, two graphs illustrating the time arrangement of occupations as they appear in a continuous sequence were used in order to encourage individuals to reflect on their everyday life. The aim was to investigate the usefulness of a time-geographical diary method (using illustrative graphs) in combination with stimulated-recall interviews, to facilitate reflections on how patterns of daily occupations change over time and the causes that lie behind these changes. The study had a qualitative design. The participants were two working, married mothers, i.e. individuals considered to have highly complex patterns of daily occupations. The data analysis was performed by using thematic content analysis. Results: The results showed that the stimulated-recall interviews, based on the graphs, facilitated new insights that came to light concerning the scope of the participants' daily life. The method enabled the participants to reflect on their patterns of daily occupations and become aware of changes relevant to explain the causes for engaging in occupations the way they did. Conclusions: The method thus seems useful in research and practice for occupational therapists working with individuals with a need to change lifestyle.

  • 4.
    Persson, Dennis
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Andersson, Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lund University.
    Defying aches and revaluating daily doing: occupational perspectives on adjusting to chronic pain2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 188-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate how people with chronic pain experience their daily doing, with a special focus on possible adjustment to pain and altered life conditions in order to cope with pain and maintain well-being. In-depth interviews were guided by themes concerning daily occupation, ways to maintain well-being, and future expectations. Using qualitative content analysis a core concept "Reappraising daily doing" was arrived at, containing the categories of altering doing processes and altering values, each in turn containing four subcategories. The findings showed that along with the grief of having to abandon jobs and former social networks, the participants coped with their everyday lives in ways that opened up the use of imagination and improvisation and the valuing of non-material and altruistic behaviour. An occupation was generally given up when aches (participants' term) became worse, except for when the occupations were so enjoyed that the pain was put out of focus. Using the concept of Occupational Value to enhance coping ability seems a reasonable strategy for occupational therapists when assisting clients in finding or maintaining meaningful daily doing and effective coping strategies for experiencing well-being. This could in turn limit the use of health care resources, which is extensive.

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