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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Samhällsvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Arbete i skolan (AiS).
    Springett, Jane
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Leif
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ottosson, Torgny
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Making sense of the challenge of smoking cessation during pregnancy: a phenomenographic approach.2005In: Health Education Research, ISSN 0268-1153, E-ISSN 1465-3648, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 367-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In general, most women are familiar with the need to stop smoking when they are pregnant. In spite of this, many women find it difficult to stop. Using a phenomenographic approach, this study explored Swedish pregnant and post-pregnant women's ways of making sense of smoking during pregnancy. A total of 17 women who either smoked throughout pregnancy or stopped smoking during pregnancy were interviewed. Five different story types of how they are making sense of smoking during pregnancy were identified: smoking can be justified; will stop later; my smoking might hurt the baby; smoking is just given up; smoking must be taken charge of. Based on the study it is argued that the approach used in health education in relation to smoking cessation in antenatal care needs to move from information transfer and advice-giving to the creation of a dialogue. The starting point should be the woman's knowledge, concerns, rationalizations and prejudices. A model is suggested in which a woman may move in a space on three axes depending on life encounters, dialogue and reflections on meaning. The goal in health education would be to encourage movement along three axes: 'increase of self-efficacy towards control', 'increase awareness by reflection on meaning of the smoking issue' and 'avoidance of defense of the smoking behavior'.

  • 2.
    Sollerhed, Ann-Chistin
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Apitzsch, Erwin
    Department of Psychology, Lund University.
    Råstam, Lennart
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
    Ejlertsson, Göran
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Människa - Hälsa - Samhälle (MHS).
    Factors associated with young children's self-perceived physical competence and self-reported physical activity2008In: Health Education Research, ISSN 0268-1153, E-ISSN 1465-3648, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 125-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with self-reported physical activity (PA), self-perceived physical fitness and competence in physical education (PE) among young children. The study included physical tests, anthropometric measures and a questionnaire. The study group comprised 206 children (114 boys and 92 girls, aged 8-12 years). Positive Odds Ratio was used in the logistic regression analyses. High level of self-reported PA was associated with membership of sport clubs and high self-perceived physical fitness. Variables associated with high self-perceived competence in PE were low age, high physical performance, living with both parents, high self-perceived physical fitness, male gender and enjoying PE. Variables associated with high self-perceived physical fitness were low age, high performance in endurance running, high self-reported PA, positive self-perceived body function and high self-perceived competence in PE. Correlations between children's self-perceived competence in PE and actual measured physical performance, between the self-perceived fitness and endurance performance and between self-reported PA and physical performance could be seen as a form of concurrent validity. One implication of the study for practitioners might be that children's own perceptions of their physical competence and activity levels could be used to roughly identify groups of children who are at risk of remaining physically inactive and therefore more prone to be unhealthy.

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