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  • 1.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Ulander, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University College, School of Health and Society.
    Thulin, Anders
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Berg, Stig
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Discharge planning of stroke patients: the relatives' perceptions of participation2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 857-865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To describe relatives' perceived participation in discharge planning for patients with stroke and identify correlates to perceived participation. Stroke affects both patients and their relatives and previous research shows that relatives were often dissatisfied with their perceived involvement in discharge planning and the information they get. Prospective cross-sectional study. The study comprised 152 consecutively enrolled relatives (mean age = 60.8 years) of acute stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit in southern Sweden during 2003-2005. Data were collected through interviews 2-3 weeks after discharge using 'Relative's Questionnaire about Participation in Discharge planning'. This instrument measures perceived participation in three subscales: R-Information-Illness, R-Information-Care/support, and R-Goals and Needs. The Overall Rating of Relative's Perceived Participation in Discharge Planning was measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS) (1-10 score). Among the relatives, 56-68% reported positively according to R-Information-Illness, but 46-53% perceived that they did not receive any information about care/medication/rehabilitation/support. About 80% perceived no participation at all in goals and needs. The mean value of the VAS was 3.89 (SD 3.40) score. Regression analyses revealed that longer stay at hospital, patients with higher education, and relatives of female patients and female relatives were associated with relatives' perceptions of higher participation in discharge planning. Relatives perceived that they needed more information and knowledge about stroke and care/medication/rehabilitation/support. They also needed to be more involved in goal-setting and in identifying patient needs. Professionals should take into consideration these associated variables to improve relatives' perceived participation. Clinicians should give more attention to the altered situation of stroke patients' relatives when planning for continuing care and when setting postdischarge goals for the patients. The professionals need to develop strategies to involve relatives in sharing information, goal-setting and needs assessment in discharge planning.

  • 2.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Ulander, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Thulin, Anders
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Berg, Stig
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Discharged after stroke - important factors for health-related quality of life2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 15-16, p. 2196-2206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. This study examines different correlates to health-related quality (HRQoL) of life after discharge in patients with stroke. Background. HRQoL is an important aspect of life after suffering a stroke. Previous research has revealed several variables associated with poststroke quality of life, including age, gender, depression, fatigue, length of hospital stay, functional status and amount of social participation. However, the time span after stroke varies greatly in the different studies. Although the multiple factors that contribute to short-term postdischarge HRQoL have potential importance for discharge planning, to our knowledge, these factors have not been systematically investigated during the earlier days following discharge. Design. Cross-sectional study. Methods. The sample consisted of 188 consecutively included individuals (mean age 74 years, 56% men) from a stroke unit in southern Sweden. The interviews were performed two to three weeks after discharge and included use of the SF-36, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, the Barthel Index, the Frenchay Activities Index, performance of interests and survey of patients' perceived participation in discharge planning. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to identify variables associated with HRQoL. Results. Multiple regression analyses with the eight scales of SF-36 as dependent variables revealed eight models, one for each scale, which were statistically significant. Depressive symptoms were associated with lower HRQoL. Ability to perform personal and social activities, interests, younger age, education (elementary school) and shorter hospital stay were related to higher HRQoL. Patients' perceived participation in discharge planning was both positively and negatively associated with HRQoL. Conclusions. Several variables were related to good HRQoL two to three weeks post-discharge, particularly fewer depressive symptoms, participation in social activities such as outdoor activities and performance of interests. Relevance to clinical practice. These results can be used to design needs assessment forms of discharge planning to promote adaptation and recovery after stroke.

  • 3.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Ulander, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University College, School of Health and Society.
    Thulin, Anders
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Berg, Stig
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Patients' perceptions of their participation in discharge planning after acute stroke2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 199-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To describe stroke patients' perceptions of their participation in the discharge planning process and identify correlates of perceived participation.

    Background. Patients have the right to participate in discharge planning, but earlier research has shown that they are often dissatisfied with the information they receive and their involvement in goal-setting during discharge planning.

    Design. Cross-sectional study.

    Methods. The sample consisted of 188 persons (mean age 74 years, SD 11·2) with acute stroke who were admitted to a stroke unit at a hospital in southern Sweden during 2003–2005. Data was collected by face-to-face interviews 2–3 weeks after discharge using the 'Patients' Questionnaire on Participation in Discharge Planning'. This instrument measures perceived participation in discharge planning in three subscales: P-Information, P-Medical Treatment, P-Goals and Needs.

    Results. The percentage of patients who perceived that they had participated in discharge planning was as follows: 72–90% according to P-Information, 29–38% according to P-Medical Treatment and 15–47% according to P-Goals and Needs. Age, education and performance of activities of daily living were significantly related to perceived participation as measured by different subscales.

    Conclusions. Most of the patients perceived that they received information, but fewer perceived participation in the planning of medical treatment and needs of care/service/rehabilitation and goal-setting. Professionals need to pay more attention to patients in different subgroups to facilitate their participation in discharge planning.

    Relevance to clinical practice. To facilitate and increase patients' participation in discharge planning, methods should be implemented for goal-setting and identifying patients' needs. Methods that foster patient participation may improve goal-orientated care, services and rehabilitation after discharge.

  • 4.
    Andersen, Anna-Eva
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Moberg, Catherine
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Bengtsson-Tops, Anita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Garmy, Pernilla
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Lund University.
    Lesbian, gay and bisexual parents' experiences of nurses' attitudes in child health care: a qualitative study2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 23-24, p. 5065-5071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe lesbian, gay and bisexual parents' experiences of nurses' attitudes in child health care.

    BACKGROUND: Lesbian, gay and bisexual people are often reluctant to disclose their gender identity for fear of discrimination. This fear may lead to avoidance of healthcare for themselves or their children and may negatively affect families' health and well-being.

    DESIGN: A qualitative inductive design was employed.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 lesbian, gay or bisexual parents (11 mothers and 3 fathers) with child health care experiences in southern Sweden. Interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Two themes were identified. One, a 'sense of marginalization', included lesbian, gay and bisexual parents' experiences of heteronormative attitudes among child health care nurses which led them to feel alienated and questioned as parents. Another, 'being respected for who you are', included experiences of being respected and included at child health care appointments.

    CONCLUSIONS: Findings paint a complex picture of lesbian, gay and bisexual parents' interactions with child health care nurses in that they experienced both positive and negative attitudes. Knowledge gaps about lesbian, gay and bisexual families within the child health care field must be filled.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Child health care nurses should work with the entire family to provide the best care for the child; however, discrimination in health care is common and often caused by a lack of knowledge. The number of children living with same-sex parents has increased more than ten-fold since the end of the 1990s. It is therefore important to explore lesbian, gay and bisexual parents' experiences with child health care nurses' attitudes to improve quality of care.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Pia
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Lena
    Centre for Caring Sciences, Lund University.
    Hallberg, Ingalill
    Centre for Caring Sciences, Lund University.
    Renvert, Stefan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Testing an oral assessment guide during chemotherapy treatmen in a Swedish care setting: a pilot study1999In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 150-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oral complications are common in patients with haematological malignancies who undergo chemotherapy treatment. A pilot study including 16 haematological patients was carried out to evaluate the oral status using an Oral Assessment Guide (OAG) and to test the reliability of the OAG. The oral assessments were made daily by registered nurses at a Department of Internal Medicine in Sweden. Once a week a dental hygienist made the oral assessments independent of the registered nurses in order to provide data for calculations of inter-rater reliability. All patients had varying degrees of alterations in the oral cavity, especially in the mucous membranes, teeth/dentures and gums. The inter-rater agreement between the nurses and the dental hygienist was good for saliva and swallow, and moderate for voice and gums. Assessments to detect alterations in the oral cavity afford the opportunity for early and individualized interventions and may decrease the risk of oral infections. It is necessary to train the nurses to ensure high levels of reliability in the oral assessments. The OAG seems to be a reliable and clinical useful tool for assessing the oral cavity status and determining changes.

  • 6.
    Bala, Sidona-Valentina
    et al.
    Lund University & Helsingborg Hospital.
    Samuelson, Karin
    Lund University.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Lund University & Jönköping University.
    Forslind, Kristina
    Helsingborg Hospital & Lund University.
    Svensson, Björn
    Lund University.
    Thomé, Bibbi
    Lund University.
    Living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis: a BARFOT study2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 17-18, p. 2646-2656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM AND OBJECTIVE: To describe and understand the meaning of living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis.

    BACKGROUND: A considerable number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis live with an ongoing active and symptomatic illness despite access to potent antirheumatic treatment. There is, however, a lack of knowledge about the meaning of living with this severe long-term illness, defined as persistent rheumatoid arthritis.

    DESIGN: A descriptive design based on a hermeneutic phenomenological method was used.

    METHODS: Ten adults with persistent rheumatoid arthritis and at least five years disease duration were interviewed. The interviews were analysed according to van Manen's method.

    RESULTS: Living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis revealed four overall themes: an existence dominated by painful symptoms and treatment, radical changes and limitations in one's life, a continual struggle to cope with one's life and to master the illness, and a dependency on those who are close by and the world around. The lifeworld was affected to a varying extent and in various ways by the illness but also by the dependence on its treatment and care that was not experienced as sufficiently meeting needs in terms of security, access to and coordination of care as well as team and rehabilitation services.

    CONCLUSIONS: Persistent rheumatoid arthritis and its treatment entail a radical effect on the person's life and quality of life. Current ordinary rheumatology care does not seem to meet the individual needs of the person with persistent rheumatoid arthritis in an optimal way.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: A greater knowledge about and understanding of the person who lives with persistent rheumatoid arthritis is important for facilitating the development of care and the relief of suffering. A holistic alternative to conventional clinical practice, such as person-centred care, could be tested as an innovative model of care. Our findings might serve as material for educational and counselling purposes for healthcare professionals.

  • 7.
    Benzein, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Health and Behavioural Sciences, Kalmar University.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Department of Health and Behavioural Sciences, Kalmar University.
    Families in home care - a resource or a burden?: district nurses' beliefs2004In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 867-875Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Caring for families in home care is a growing part of Swedish district nurses' professional work. District nurses' facilitative and constraining beliefs about families guide the extent to which families are acknowledged and engaged in the care.

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to explore district nurses' beliefs about families in home care.

    DESIGN: Explorative, descriptive.

    METHODS: Five district nurses participated in focus group interviews on three separate occasions. Each interview lasted approximately 90 minutes, was audio taped and transcribed verbatim. A thematic content analysis was used for analyses of the data.

    RESULTS: The result revealed two underpinning beliefs held by the district nurses towards families in home care: families are a resource and Families are a burden. Families could be a resource for the patient, for the other family members as well as for the district nurses themselves. Families could be a resource for the patient both practically and emotionally by e.g. being present and listening. Being open in communication with other family members and district nurses was also considered as a resource. The district nurses considered families as a burden when they were experienced as demanding in various ways, for example, when family members did not act in a way that pleased the district nurses or when family members showed their suffering.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study highlight some facilitating and constraining beliefs held by district nurses: families can be both a resource and a burden.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: It is important that district nurses are aware of what beliefs they hold as their beliefs guide their actions towards the families.

  • 8.
    Blomqvist, Kerstin
    et al.
    Centre for Caring Sciences, Lund University.
    Hallberg, Ingalill R.
    Centre for Caring Sciences, Lund University.
    Pain in older adults living in sheltered accommodation: agreement between assessments by older adults and staff1999In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate the presence of pain, pain duration, localization(s), intensity, type and pharmacological treatment among older adults living in sheltered accommodation or receiving rehabilitation, as well as the agreement between pain assessments performed by staff and the older adults. Twenty-nine randomly selected older adults (65+ years) and the staff who looked after them participated in a structured interview based on standardized measures for pain assessment and physical, intellectual and communicative functions. Pain was found to be common, with a majority of participants experiencing it every day or all of the time. Nine out of 22 of the older adults in pain had no pain relief drugs at all. Agreement between assessments by the older adults and the staff was no higher than moderate and in general pain levels were underestimated. The findings indicate that older adults were at risk of undetected and untreated pain and the risk was even higher for those with speech difficulties. The provision of good nursing care for older adults in sheltered accommodation requires systematic routines for frequent pain assessments.

  • 9.
    Bolejko, Anetta
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Zackrisson, Sophia
    Skåne University Hospital Malmö.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Department of Caring Science, Malmö University.
    A roller coaster of emotions and sense: coping with the perceived psychosocial consequences of a false-positive screening mammography2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 13-13, p. 2053-2062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To explore coping with the perceived psychosocial consequences of a false-positive screening mammography. Background Mammographic screening has been found effective to decrease breast cancer (BC) mortality, yet there are adverse effects. Psychosocial consequences of false-positive mammographic screening have mainly been investigated from a population-based perspective. A call for qualitative studies to further explore these consequences has thus been postulated. To date, qualitative studies have elucidated women's experiences following their recall breast examinations, but their coping with perceived psychosocial consequences of a false-positive screening mammography has not yet been explored. Design An explorative qualitative study. Methods Face-to-face interviews were held with a purposive heterogeneous sample of 13 Swedish-speaking women with a false-positive screening mammography. The transcripts were analysed by the use of an inductive content analysis. Results Coping with the perceived psychosocial consequences of a false-positive screening mammography implied a roller coaster of emotion and sense. Women described how they imagined the worst and were in a state of uncertainty feeling threatened by a fatal disease. Conversely, they felt protected, surrounded by their families and being professionally taken care of, which together with perceived sisterhood and self-empowerment evoked strength and hope. Being aware of family responsibility became a crucial matter. Experiencing false-positive screening raised thoughts of thankfulness and reappraisal of life, although an ounce of BC anxiety remained. Consequently, gained awareness about BC screening and values in life surfaced. Conclusions Experiencing a false-positive screening mammography triggers agonising experiences evoking a variety of coping strategies. Provision of screening raises the issue of responsibility for an impact on psychosocial well-being among healthy women. Relevance to clinical practice Gained knowledge might provide a basis for interventions to prevent psychosocial consequences of false-positive mammographic screening and provide support for women with a potentially compromised ability to overcome such consequences.

  • 10.
    Borg, Christel
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University.
    Hallberg, Ingalill R
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University.
    Blomqvist, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Life satisfaction among older people (65+) with reduced self-care capacity: the relationship to social, health and financial aspects.2006In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 607-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed at investigating life satisfaction and its relation to living conditions, overall health, self-care capacity, feeling lonely, physical activities and financial resources among people (65+) with reduced self-care capacity. BACKGROUND: Knowledge about factors related to low life satisfaction among older people with reduced self-care capacity is sparse, although this is important in health care and nursing so that the care is adapted to their needs and perspective. Previous research has mainly focused on isolated aspects such as pain in relation to life satisfaction among older people in general and less among so those with reduced self-care capacity in general. DESIGN AND METHOD: A subsample of 522 persons was selected from a randomly selected cross-sectional survey using a modified form of the Older Americans' Resources Schedule and Life Satisfaction Index Z. RESULTS: The mean age in the total sample was 77.9; women (79.5) were significantly older than men (77.0). Low life satisfaction was found among women, as well as those living in special accommodations. Life Satisfaction Index Z was 15.3 (SD 5.6) in the total sample. Gender and living conditions did not explain life satisfaction whilst poor overall self-reported health and poor financial resources in relation to needs had the strongest explanatory value. Also of significant importance were loneliness, the degree of reduced self-care capacity and feeling worried. CONCLUSION: Life satisfaction in older people with reduced self-care capacity is determined by several factors, with social, physical, mental and financial aspects probably interacting with each other; especially feeling lonely, degree of self-care capacity, poor overall health, feeling worried and poor financial resources in relation to needs. These factors need to be considered in the care of these people to preserve or improve their life satisfaction. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nursing interventions in terms of preventive home visits, rehabilitation, health education directed towards physical, psychological, social and economic aspects of importance may help to preserve or improve life satisfaction for those with reduced self-care capacity.

  • 11.
    Emsfors, Åsa
    et al.
    Central Hospital Kristianstad.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Jönköping University.
    Elgán, Carina
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education.
    Nursing actions that create a sense of good nursing care in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 17-18, p. 2680-2688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To identify and describe nursing actions performed by nurses that create a sense of good nursing care in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration.

    BACKGROUND: People who suffer from wet age-related macular degeneration risk central vision loss. Treatment with antivascular endothelial growth factor is the only available option at present that preserves vision and no definitive cure currently exists. Patients feel that they are compelled to accept this treatment because they might otherwise become blind.

    DESIGN: An explorative and descriptive design based on the critical incident technique was used.

    METHOD: Interviews with 16 Swedish patients who all had received intravitreal treatment for wet age-related macular degeneration.

    RESULTS: Two main areas of good nursing care were identified: 'Being perceived as an individual' and 'Being empowered'. The first area was divided into two categories: being respectful and being engaged. Being respectful was observed when nurses had a benevolent attitude towards their patients and answered questions kindly and politely. Patients saw themselves as individuals when nurses were available for conversation and focused on them. The second area was divided into two categories: encouraging participation and creating confidence. Encouraging participation refers to when nurses provided information continuously. Nurses instilled confidence and trust in their patients by keeping promises and by being honest.

    CONCLUSIONS: A respectful interaction between patients and caregivers is necessary for patients to obtain beneficial health care.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Patient interviews revealed important information about nursing actions that created a sense of good nursing care in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration. Nurses acknowledged people as individuals and created trust by building partnerships and sharing decision-making. To address each patient's concerns, nurses need to prioritise each patient's narrative and participation by documenting agreements in their medical record.

  • 12.
    Gardsten, Cecilia
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap. Linnéuniversitetet.
    Blomqvist, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University.
    Larsson, Åse
    Region Skåne.
    Lindberg, Agneta
    Hässleholm Hospital Organization.
    Olsson, Gith
    Hässleholm Hospital Organization.
    Challenges in everyday life among recently diagnosed and more experienced adults with type 2 diabetes: a multistage focus group study2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 19-20, p. 3666-3678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify perceived challenges related to self-management among recently diagnosed adults and those with longer experience of type 2 diabetes as a foundation for the future development of a person-centred information and communication technology service.

    BACKGROUND: Learning self-management of type 2 diabetes includes mastering the skills required to complete complex emotional and physical tasks. A service developed with the participation of stakeholders may be an alternative way to meet rising needs for self-management.

    DESIGN: Qualitative descriptive design influenced by a participatory approach.

    METHODS: Multistage focus group interviews among one group of recently diagnosed (≤3yrs, n=4) adults and one group with longer experience (≥5yrs, n=7) of type 2 diabetes.

    RESULTS: Challenges in self-management in everyday life with type 2 diabetes were identified: understanding; developing skills and abilities; and mobilizing personal strengths. Both groups described challenges in understanding the causes of fluctuating blood glucose and in, developing and mobilizing skills for choosing healthful food and eating regularly. The recently diagnosed group was more challenged by learning to accept the diagnosis and becoming motivated to change habits while the experienced group was mainly challenged by issues about complications and medications.

    CONCLUSION: Adults with diabetes have different needs for support during different phases of the disease. From a person-centred perspective, it would be desirable to meet individual needs for self-management on peoples' own terms through a technological service that could reach and connect to a large number of people. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Garmy, Pernilla
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Jakobsson, Liselotte
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Experiences of cancer rehabilitation: a cross-sectional study2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 9-10, p. 2014-2021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate the cancer rehabilitation experiences of working-age cancer survivors.

    BACKGROUND: Cancer survivors have extremely complex needs, spanning physical, vocational, and sexual domains. Although cancer rehabilitation services have been found to eliminate or reduce these strains, these services are often underutilized.

    DESIGN: A cross-sectional study design was employed.

    METHODS: A survey of persons over the age of 18 with a cancer diagnosis, enrolled in the Social Insurance Agency in a municipality in southern Sweden (n =168, 68% women) was conducted.

    RESULTS: Patients who used the cancer rehabilitation service (57%) were generally satisfied with it. Of participants, 26% reported not having received an offer of rehabilitation. Of those who reported that they received information about cancer rehabilitation services, most also reported that they received this information from a healthcare service professional (69%): for example, from the oncology nurse or the oncologist, whereas 20% claimed they received the information from the administrator of the Swedish Social Insurance Agency. A minority of children and family members of patients received support from the healthcare system.

    CONCLUSIONS: More efforts should be taken to reach patients in need of cancer rehabilitation. Additionally, more attention should be directed toward family members and young children.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: More than one in four patients claimed to not have received an offer of cancer rehabilitation, and an even greater number of patients claimed that their spouses and children had never received an offer for this service either. Hence, there is a communication barrier that needs to be overcome. Health providers should be aware that information needs to be repeated several times, and presented both orally and in writing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Hellqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University Hospital.
    Dizdar, Nil
    Linköping University.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University.
    Sund Levander, Märta
    Linköping University.
    Improving self-management for persons with Parkinson's disease through education focusing on management of daily life: patients' and relatives' experience of the Swedish National Parkinson School.2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 19-20, p. 3719-3728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: The two folded aim of this study was firstly to identify and describe experiences valuable for managing daily life after participation in the NPS self-management intervention. The second part was to explore the applicability of the Self- and family management framework by Grey and colleagues for persons with Parkinson's Disease and their relatives.

    BACKGROUND: The impact of PD is evident on the lives of both patients and relatives. The National Parkinson School (NPS) is a Swedish self-management program designed for patients and relatives, aiming at teaching strategies helpful for the ability of self-management, in order to promote life satisfaction.

    DESIGN: Qualitative explorative with inductive and deductive analysis.

    METHODS: Five group discussions with NPS participants were audio-recorded. Verbatim transcriptions were analysed inductively with thematic analysis according to Braun and Clarke, and the findings were then applied deductively to the existing model for patients with chronic disease.

    RESULTS: Through the first step of inductive analysis three themes capturing the meaning, value and experience of being a participant at the NPS were identified: Exchanging experiences and feeling support, Adjustment and acceptance of PD for managing daily life, and Promoting life satisfaction. The deductive analysis applied the inductive findings to the Self-and family management framework of chronically ill to explore the fit to persons with PD and relatives attending the NPS program.

    CONCLUSIONS: The NPS program is a promising approach for helping persons with PD and their relatives to achieve better self-management of disease and improved life satisfaction. Further evaluations of program outcomes in clinical practice are warranted.

    RELEVANCE OF CLINICAL PRACTICE: Self-management programs like the NPS is a promising approach in facilitating a positive mind-set and outlook on life and gain knowledge to understand, adapt and handle chronic disease, such as PD, better. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Jakobsson, Liselotte
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lovén, Lars
    Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill
    Sexual problems in men with prostate cancer in comparison with men with benign prostatic hyperplasia and men from the general population2001In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 573-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • In a questionnaire study, men with prostate cancer (n=155) or benign prostatic hyperplasia (n=131) identified more sexual problems than did men from the general population (n=129). Sexual dysfunction was acknowledged regarding sexual pleasure and attraction, erectile function and sexual satisfaction and sexual performance.

    • Lowered rates of sexual desire, pleasure and attraction were found when comparing their situation in recollection of pre-treatment situation to the current situation. Lower intercourse frequency and sexual satisfaction were also found.

    • Medication, masturbation and artificial aids to achieve erection were not used as substitutes for shortcomings of erectile function either by men with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia nor by their partners.

    • There seemed to be a lack of information about the illness and treatment consequences for sexual life, including what physical dysfunction to expect after surgery and also what possible help to expect to compensate for the shortcomings.

  • 16.
    Jakobsson, Ulf
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University.
    Hallberg , Ingalill Rahm
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University.
    Exploring determinants for quality of life among older people in pain and in need of help for daily living2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 3a, p. 95-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. The aim of the study was to investigate the quality of life and related factors among older people who are in pain and in need of help to manage daily living. Background. To intervene against the low quality of life in nursing care knowledge about factors affecting it is needed and this is especially important for vulnerable people such as those who suffer from pain and who are in need of help to manage daily living. Methods. Five hundred and twenty-six people, aged 75–102 years participated in this study. Results. Those in pain reported a significantly higher degree of all complaints and lower quality of life in all measures compared with those not in pain. Overall quality of life was associated with mobility problems, sleeping problems and depressed mood, while health-related quality of life was associated with living in special accommodations, walking problems, mobility problems and fatigue. Conclusions. Those in need of help to manage daily living and in pain seem to be at higher risk of lowered quality of life than those not in pain and the lower quality of life among those in pain is probably caused by the complex of complaints rather than pain per se. Relevance to clinical practice. Daily nursing care should identify and treat the complex of complaints related to pain as well as pain itself, to improve everyday life and quality of life for older people in pain.

  • 17.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University.
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    The Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund.
    Jakobsson, Ulf
    Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University.
    Hallberg, Ingalill R
    The Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Care satisfaction among older people receiving public care and service at home or in special accommodation2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 3-4, p. 318-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore care satisfaction in relation to place of living, health-related quality of life, functional dependency and health complaints among people 65 years or older, receiving public care and service. The concept public care and service concerns formal care from the municipality, including home help, home nursing care, rehabilitation and a special accommodation.

    BACKGROUND: To be able to provide care and service of high quality to older people, knowledge about factors influencing their experience of satisfaction with the care is essential.

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional, including comparison and correlation.

    METHODS: One-hundred sixty-six people receiving public care and service from the municipality were interviewed regarding demography, functional ability, perceived health complaints and care. Health-related quality of life was measured with SF-12, and self-rated care satisfaction was measured with a questionnaire.

    RESULTS: Low self-rated care satisfaction was associated with dependency in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, blindness, faeces incontinence and anxiety, while high self-rated care satisfaction was associated with dependency in Personal Activities of Daily Living. Those at home rated an overall higher care satisfaction and were more satisfied with care continuity and personal relations; they thought that the staff had more time and were more respectful and quiet, than the ratings by those in a special accommodation (equivalent to a nursing home).

    CONCLUSIONS: Care satisfaction and health-related quality of life among older people was more associated with functional impairment and health complaints than to whether care and service was received at home or in a special accommodation.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: An approach using intervention focused on functional ability and health complaints is important for development of improved care satisfaction for older people receiving public care and service.

  • 18.
    Larsson, Helena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I.
    Blomqvist, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    From a diagnostic and particular approach to a person-centred approach: a development project2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 3-4, p. 465-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To investigate changes over time in an interdisciplinary group that was engaged in development work regarding pain and pain assessment.

    Background

    The outcomes of nursing research do not always find their way to the daily care of patients. This is evident within, for instance, physical rehabilitation, where relieving patients' pain is a major challenge. To gain new understanding, develop and change, registered nurses have a great part in engaging their staff.

    Design

    A qualitative study using a participatory action research approach was used, and a hermeneutic analysis was conducted.

    Methods

    A group of three registered nurses, two assistant nurses and a physiotherapist took part in focus group sessions. This group was followed with seven repeated sessions during a period of five months from January 2010 until June 2010. A hermeneutic analysis was used.

    Results

    The participants changed their attitudes towards the patient in pain, their own caring role and the team's role towards a more person-centred care.

    Conclusions

    Participation and reflection were key aspects as means to transfer knowledge into action and establish change. The participants came to the sessions, shared actively their experiences and expressed pride in the work they accomplished. This can be seen as an expression of a need to share and a joy to be working together in a person-oriented development area. In addition, the approach seemed to contribute to increased job satisfaction.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    The participants expressed that their work resulted in a changed approach to pain and pain assessment in their daily practice at the ward. The participants were actively engaged in enhancing their work with pain and pain assessment in their own daily practice and in implementing research-based knowledge.

  • 19.
    Lindskov, Susanne
    et al.
    Department of Geriatrics and Neurology, Central Hospital Kristianstad.
    Westergren, Albert
    Research and Development Unit, Central Hospital Kristianstad.
    Hagell, Peter
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    A controlled trial of an educational programme for people with Parkinson's disease2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 11C, p. 368-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate patient-reported health outcomes of a multidisciplinary group educational programme for people with Parkinson's disease (PD), delivered as part of routine clinical practice. BACKGROUND: Studies suggest that educational programmes for people with PD have potential to improve patients' perceived health and well-being. However, controlled trials of multidisciplinary group educational programmes are lacking. DESIGN: Naturalistic non-randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Following ethical approval and informed consent, 48 people with PD (58% men; mean age, 69.3) received the intervention and 48 (52% men; mean age, 72) were allocated to a delayed intervention control group. The intervention was a six-week (two hours per week) multidisciplinary group educational programme. Patient-reported health outcomes were assessed by the 12-item short-form health survey (SF-12) at baseline and one month postintervention. RESULTS: Changes in SF-12 scores at follow-up did not differ between the groups and there were no within-group differences over time. Daily dopaminergic medication increased in the control group but not in the intervention group. CONCLUSIONS: Slightly, but significantly, increased drug requirement in the control group may in part have masked deterioration in perceived health. However, failure to demonstrate improved patient-reported health may relate to the intervention design, response shift (i.e. change in how people perceive their health), and/or quality and choice of outcome measures. Further studies that take these aspects into consideration are needed to determine the potential for patient education interventions in PD. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses and other healthcare professionals need to document the effects of patient educational programmes and to be aware of the importance of intervention design and challenges associated with evaluating programme outcomes. Otherwise, there is a risk that benefits cannot be demonstrated and that decision makers will not invest resources in interventions that actually are beneficial for chronically ill people.

  • 20.
    Rantzow, Veronica
    et al.
    Vocational Education Helsingborg.
    Andersson, Pia
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Oral hälsa och folkhälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research environment Oral Health - Public Health - Quality of Life (OHAL). Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University.
    Occurrence of oral health problems and planned measures in dependent older people in nursing care2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 23-24, p. 4381-4389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to describe oral health problems and planned measures in older people receiving nursing care.

    BACKGROUND: Poor oral health conditions have a negative impact on the quality of life of older people. Therefore, oral care is an important task in daily nursing activities.

    METHODS: Data were obtained from the web-based Swedish national quality register Senior Alert. Data regarding oral health status and planned measures in individuals ≥65 years from one county in Sweden between July 2014 and June 2015 were included. The Revised Oral Assessment Guide - the Jönköping (ROAG-J), was used routinely by nursing staff in nursing care facilities to measure oral health status.

    RESULTS: Oral assessments were made on 2567 individuals (65.7% women). The most common oral health problem was related to "Teeth" (43.0%), which indicates deficient oral hygiene and/or broken teeth. At least one measure was planned in all the participants. The most common planned measures were "Moistening of the mouth" (16.6%), followed by "Brushing - assistance or complete help" (13.5%).

    CONCLUSION: Oral health problems were common, and planned measures did not seem to be sufficient to address the identified problems. The results indicate that greater priority should be given to the oral health care of older people in nursing care.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The study highlights the importance of not only identifying oral health problems but also having knowledge and strategies for oral health care. Collaboration is needed to support nurses in caring for the oral health care of older people in nursing homes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 21.
    Schön Persson, Sophie
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för folkhälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Lund University.
    Nilsson Lindström, Petra
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för folkhälsovetenskap.
    Pettersson, Pär
    Nilsson, Marie
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Oral hälsa och folkhälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Forskningsmiljön Människa - Hälsa - Samhälle (MHS). Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Blomqvist, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Resources for work-related well-being: a qualitative study about healthcare employees' experiences of relationships at work.2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 23-24, p. 4302-4310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore municipal healthcare employees' experiences of relationships with care recipients and colleagues. The specific research questions were when do the relationships enhance well-being, and what prerequisites are needed for such relationships to occur?.

    BACKGROUND: Employees in health and social care for older people often depict their work in negative terms, and they often take a high number of sick leaves. Despite the heavy workload, other employees express well-being at work and highlight social relationships as one reason for this. However, a greater understanding of how these relationships can act as resources for workplace well-being is needed.

    DESIGN: The design of the study was qualitative and exploratory.

    METHODS: Qualitative interview studies were conducted with twenty-three healthcare employees in municipal healthcare. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data.

    RESULTS: Two themes were identified as resources for promoting relationships between employees and care recipients or colleagues: (i) Being personal - a close interpersonal relationship to a care recipient - and (ii) Colleague belongingness - a sense of togetherness within the working group. Spending quality time together, providing long-term care and providing additional care were antecedents for a close interpersonal relationship with care recipients. Trust, mutual responsibility and cooperation were antecedents for a sense of togetherness within the working group.

    CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide an empirical base to raise awareness of relationships with care recipients and colleagues as health aspects. Relationships among employees in healthcare are vital resources that must be considered to create sustainable workplaces, and consequently improve the quality of care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Stenzelius, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm
    The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Westergren, Albert
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Bowel function among people 75+ reporting faecal incontinence in relation to help seeking, dependency and quality of life2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 458-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim was to compare faecal incontinence and related bowel symptoms among men and women and being dependent or not (aged >or=75 years) and furthermore to identify which bowel symptoms predicted help seeking, dependency and low quality of life (QoL). BACKGROUND: Faecal incontinence (FI) in old age is a common condition and influences daily life to a great extent, although few actually seek medical help. METHODS: A total of 248 people with reported difficulties controlling faeces answered a postal questionnaire or were interviewed with questions about FI-related bowel symptoms. A factor analysis resulted in four areas of bowel symptoms and was used in logistic regression with help seeking, dependency and low QoL as dependent variables. RESULTS: Of all the subjects, 56.4% had leakage, 54.7% did not reach the toilet in time, 55.6% had incomplete emptying, 27.9% had hard stool, 36.8% bother from moisture from the anus, 32.2% could not withstand urgency for five minutes and 17% had red skin or wounds in the genital region. Women and those dependent were most affected. Totally 40.8% had sought help and 30.1% used protective aids. Leakage, discomfort, consistency and contractibility symptoms were the categories of bowel symptoms related to FI. Discomfort predicted help seeking (OR 3.0), dependency (OR 1.5) and physical QoL (OR 1.7). Leakage predicted help seeking (OR 1.9) but not dependency and QoL. CONCLUSIONS: Overall bowel function was disturbed among those with FI and unmet needs seem problematic especially for women and those needing help in Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Encouragement to seek and get medical help and to use protective aids may improve the very low quality of life in this group. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Older people with FI should be asked about, assessed for and examined for overall bowel function to get adequate treatment and be encouraged to use protection.

  • 23.
    Suhonen, Riitta
    et al.
    Health Care District of Forssa.
    Berg, Agneta
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Kalmar County Council.
    Kalafati, Maria
    Faculty of Nursing, University of Athens.
    Katajisto, Jouko
    Department of Statistics, University of Turku.
    Land, Lucy
    Birmingham City University.
    Lemonidou, Chryssoula
    Faculty of Nursing, University of Athens.
    Schmidt, Lee A.
    Niehoff School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood.
    Välimäki, Maritta
    Department of Nursing Science/Hospital District of South-Western Finland, University of Turku.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    Department of Nursing Science/Hospital District of South-Western Finland, University of Turku.
    European orthopaedic and trauma patients' perceptions of nursing care: a comparative study2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 20, p. 2818-2829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To compare English, Finnish, Greek and Swedish orthopaedic and trauma patients' perceptions of nursing care received during hospitalisation. BACKGROUND: Patient perceptions are important when evaluating nursing care delivery. Evaluations usually take place sub-nationally though European citizens may be treated throughout the European Union. International comparative studies are possible because of the universal nature and philosophical roots of quality in nursing care. They are needed to assist in improving care outcomes. DESIGN: A cross-sectional, comparative study design was used. METHOD: The Schmidt Perception of Nursing Care Survey was used to obtain data from orthopaedic and trauma patients in acute hospitals in four countries: Finland (n = 425, response rate 85%), Greece (n = 315, 86%), Sweden (n = 218, 73%) and UK (n = 135, 85%). Data were first analysed using descriptive statistics, then between-country comparisons were computed inferentially using a one-way analysis of variance and a univariate analysis of covariance. RESULTS: Between-country differences were found in patients' perceptions of the nursing care received. Over the whole Schmidt Perception of Nursing Care Survey the Swedish and Finnish patients gave their care the highest assessments and the Greek patients the lowest. The same trend was seen in each of the four sub-scales: Seeing The Individual Patient, Explaining, Responding and Watching. Responding was given the highest assessments in each participating country and Seeing the Individual Patient the lowest except in Greece. CONCLUSIONS: Further research is needed to consider whether the between-country differences found are caused by differences between cultures, nursing practices, roles of healthcare personnel or patients in the different countries. The Schmidt Perception of Nursing Care Survey is suitable for the assessment of European orthopaedic and trauma patients' perceptions of nursing care received during hospitalisation. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results are useful in evaluating and developing nursing care in hospitals from different European countries.

  • 24.
    Suhonen, Riitta
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku.
    Schmidt, Lee A.
    Niehoff School of Nursing, Loyola University Medical Center, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood.
    Katajisto, Jouko
    Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Turku.
    Berg, Agneta
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University.
    Kalafati, Maria
    Faculty of Nursing, University of Athens.
    Land, Lucy
    Centre for Health and Social Care Research, Birmingham City University.
    Lemonidou, Chryssoula
    Faculty of Nursing, University of Athens.
    Välimäki, Maritta
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku.
    Cross-cultural validity of the Individualised Care Scale – a Rasch model analysis2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 5-6, p. 648-660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives.  The aim of this study was to investigate, using Rasch model analysis, the measurement invariance of the item ratings of the Individualised Care Scale. Background.  Evidence of reliability is needed in cross-cultural comparative studies. To be used in different cultures and languages, the items must function the same way. Design.  A methodological and comparative design. Methods.  Secondary analysis of data, gathered in 2005–2006 from a cross-cultural survey using the Individualised Care Scale from Finnish, Greek, Swedish and English predischarge hospitalised orthopaedic and trauma patients (n = 1093), was used. The Rasch model, which produces calibrations (item locations and rank) and item fit statistics, was computed using the Winstep program. Results.  The rank of average Individualised Care Scale item calibrations (−2·26–1·52) followed a generally similar trend (Infit ≤ 1·3), but slight differences in the item rank by country were found and some item misfit was identified within the same items. There was some variation in the order and location of some Individualised Care Scale items for individual countries, but the overall pattern of item calibration was generally corresponding. Conclusions.  The Rasch model provided information about the appropriateness, sensitivity and item function in different cultures providing more in-depth information about the psychometric properties of the Individualised Care Scale instrument. Comparison of the four versions of the Individualised Care Scale – patient revealed general correspondence in the item calibration patterns although slight differences in the rank order of the items were found. Some items showed also a slight misfit. Based on these results, the phrasing and targeting of some items should be considered. Relevance to clinical practice.  The Individualised Care Scale – Patient version can be used in cross-cultural studies for the measurement of patients’ perceptions of individualised care. Information obtained with the use of the Individualised Care Scale in clinical nursing practice is important, and valid measures are needed in evaluating patients’ assessment of individualised care, one indicator of care quality.

  • 25.
    Suhonen, Riitta
    et al.
    Finland.
    Stolt, Minna
    Finland.
    Berg, Agneta
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Katajisto, Jouko
    Finland.
    Lemonidou, Chrysoula
    Grekland.
    Patiraki, Elisabeth
    Grekland.
    Sjövall, Katarina
    Lund University.
    Charalambous, Andreas
    Cypern & Finland.
    Cancer patients' perceptions of quality of care attributes: associations with age, perceived health status, gender and education.2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 1-2, p. 306-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to explore the associations between patients' gender, education, health status in relation to: assessments of patient-centered quality and individuality in care and trust in nurses for those <65, (working age) and ≥65 years (older people).

    BACKGROUND: Patients' assessments of the quality of care they receive is essential for the development of the provision of patient care and services. Previous studies have revealed age of the patient is associated with their assessment of care quality attributes.

    DESIGN: The study employed a cross-sectional, multi-cultural comparative survey design.

    METHODS: The data were collected using questionnaires among hospitalised cancer patients (N=876, n=599, 68%) in four European countries: Greece, Cyprus, Sweden and Finland. The data were divided into two sub-groups based on age (cut point 65 years) and were analysed statistically.

    RESULTS: Cancer patients' age, gender and level of education were not related to their assessments of care quality attributes: person-centered care quality; individuality in care and trust in nurses. Sub-group analysis of the older adults and those of working age showed clear associations with patients' assessments of quality of care attributes and perceived health status. The lower the perceived health status the lower the assessment of care quality attributes.

    DISCUSSION: The results suggest that the cancer itself is the strongest determinant of the care delivered, rather than any patient characteristics, such as age, education or gender. Perceived health status, in association with cancer patient assessments of care quality attributes, may be useful in the development of patient-centered, individualised care strategies alongside a stronger focus on people instead of cancer-care related processes and duties.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The findings of this study have implications for cancer care professionals in terms of patient assessment and care planning. The measures may be useful in assessing quality of cancer nursing care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Thurang, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnéus University, Växjö.
    Bengtsson Tops, Anita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    Living an unstable everyday life while attempting to perform normality – the meaning of living as an alcohol-dependent woman2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 3-4, p. 423-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To illuminate the meaning of living with alcohol dependency as a woman. Background The number of women suffering from alcohol dependency is increasing. Today there are shortcomings in knowledge about the lived experiences of being a woman with alcohol dependency; knowledge which might be of importance for meeting these women's specific needs of care. Design The study has a qualitative design. Fourteen women with alcohol dependency participated in open in-depth interviews. Method Data were analysed according to a phenomenological-hermeneutic method, and interpreted by help from gender and caring perspectives as well as results from previous research of alcohol dependency. Results In relation to the women's senses of well-being, four main gender formations were found; An unstable self involving continual and rapid swings between emotional and bodily reactions. Ambivalence – meaning ambiguous feelings towards themselves as human beings and how they lead their lives. Introspectiveness – involving reflections, pondering and being introverted. Attempts to perform normality – covering – dealing with life through various strategies and facades to live up to the expectations of how to behave as a woman. Conclusion Living with alcohol dependency as a woman constitutes of a rapid shifting everyday life resulting in senses of alienation as well as private introspection leading to self-degradation, and to a lesser extent meaningfulness and hope. It also constitutes of managing to perform normality. Relevance to clinical practice When supporting women with alcohol dependency towards wellbeing, professionals need to work towards approaching the woman's inner thoughts, share them and reflect over them together. To support these women to find balance in life, caregivers need to cooperate with the women to find out how best to live a life adjusted to the woman's abilities and wishes.

  • 27.
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University.
    Hagell, Peter
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Willman, A.
    School of Health Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Risk factors and prevention among patients with hospital-acquired and pre-existing pressure ulcers in an acute care hospital2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 13, p. 1718-1727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to describe and identify risk factors associated with hospital-acquired pressure ulcers among adults in an acute care hospital compared with patients with pre-existing pressure ulcers present on admission. A further aim was to identify the preventive measures performed with both groups respectively.

    BACKGROUND: Pressure ulcers occur most often in older and immobile persons with severe acute illness and neurological deficits. However, few studies have addressed risk factors that are associated with hospital-acquired pressure ulcers compared with patients with pre-existing pressure ulcers.

    DESIGN: A point prevalence study with a cross-sectional survey design was conducted at a Swedish university hospital.

    METHOD: Data on 535 patients were recorded using a modified version of the protocol developed and tested by the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, including the Braden scale for risk assessment.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of pressure ulcers was 27% (95% confidence interval, 23-31%). Higher age and a total Braden score below 17 were significantly associated with the presence of pressure ulcers. Among individual risk factors higher age, limited activity level and friction and shear while seated or lying down were associated with hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, whereas only higher age and friction and shear were associated with the presence of pressure ulcers in the overall sample. There was an overall sparse use of preventive measures to relieve pressure.

    CONCLUSION: The findings of the present study revealed that pressure ulcers and the insufficient use of preventive measure to relieve pressure is still a problem in acute care settings. A continued focus must be placed on staff training in identifying patients at risk for pressure ulcers development.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Increasing the ability to identify patients who are at risk for pressure ulcer development can assist in preventing unnecessary complications and suffering as well as reduce costs.

  • 28. Werntoft, Elisabet
    et al.
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Gerontology and Caring Sciences, Lund University.
    Rooke, Liselotte
    Hermerén, Göran
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm
    Older people's views of prioritization in health care: the applicability of an interview study2005In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 14, no 8B, p. 64-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Older people's views of prioritization in health care. The applicability of an interview study. Old age has been stated as a criterion for prioritization in health care, although older people are seldom asked for their opinions. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the applicability of a questionnaire as a base for an interview study to explore older people's experiences and views of prioritization in health care.

    DESIGN: Descriptive, with a qualitative and quantitative approach. Fifty-four persons, 32 women and 22 men (aged 60-93 years), were asked to participate in a structured, tape-recorded interview covering their experience and views of the priorities applied in health care.

    RESULTS: The questions in the interview manual appeared to be applicable for collecting data concerning views of prioritization, but the analysis revealed that certain questions, particularly on economic matters, were missing. The procedure, a personal structured interview had advantages, for example, in capturing the respondents' reflections on the questions. The respondents emphasized the equal value of all human beings and that age is not a basis for prioritization within health care. The respondents also showed an unwillingness to precede anyone in rank.

    IMPLICATIONS: The questions used proved to be adequate but to be really complete further questions need to be added. This pilot study indicates that older people's views on priorities in health care differ from those expressed by the younger population. The study therefore needs to be replicated in a larger sample to be fully able to understand older people's views of prioritization, which will require exploring gender and age differences as well as other aspects that may explain variations.

  • 29.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Siv
    Department for Rehabilitation Medicine, Central Hospital Kristianstad, Northeast Skåne Healthcare District.
    Andersson, Pia
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ohlsson, Ola
    Department of Internal Medicine, Central Hospital Kristianstad, Northeast Skåne Healthcare District.
    Hallberg, Ingalill
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University.
    Eating difficulties, need for assisted eating, nutritional status and pressure ulcers in patients admitted for geriatric stroke rehabilitation2001In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 257-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the types and extent of eating difficulties, the need for assistance when eating, the nutritional status and pressure ulcers in consecutive patients (n = 162) admitted for stroke rehabilitation over a period of 1 year. Structured observations and assessments of eating, nutritional status (subjective global assessment of nutritional status), pressure ulcers and activities in daily living (Katz ADL-index) were performed by a nurse who also trained the staff to perform these assessments. Difficulties in eating were found in 80%, and 52.5% were unable to eat without assistance. Eating difficulties were: 'eats three-quarters or less of served food' (60%), difficulties in 'manipulating food on the plate' (56%), 'transportation of food to the mouth' (46%), 'sitting position' (29%), 'aberrant eating speed' (slow or forced) (26%), 'manipulating food in the mouth' (leakage, hoarding, chewing difficulties) (24%), 'swallowing difficulties' (18%), 'opening and/or closing the mouth' (16%), and 'alertness' (9%). Thirty-two percent were undernourished (49% of patients needing assisted eating and 13% of those not needing assistance, P < 0.0005). Among patients who were dependent in one or more functions according to the Katz ADL-index, 15% had pressure ulcers. The strongest eating variables for predicting nutritional status were 'alertness', 'swallowing difficulties', 'eats three-quarters or less of served food', and 'aberrant eating speed'. Nutritional status could in turn significantly predict pressure ulcers. Eating difficulties among patients with stroke are complex and the patient's situation before stroke adds to this complexity, especially among those dependent on assisted eating. As difficulties occur both among patients needing and not needing assisted eating, all patients with stroke admitted for rehabilitation need to be systematically assessed for eating difficulties and action needs to be taken to facilitate eating, especially as patients with eating difficulties risk becoming undernourished and in turn developing pressure ulcers.

  • 30.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Torfadóttir, Ólina
    Akureyri Hospital, Iceland.
    Ulander, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Axelsson, Carolina
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Lindholm, Christina
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Malnutrition prevalence and precision in nutritional care: an intervention study in one teaching hospital in Iceland2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 13-14, p. 1830-1837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The aim of this study was to explore the point prevalence of malnutrition and the targeting of nutritional interventions in relation to undernutrition risk before and after an intervention. Background. Malnutrition risk and the precision in targeting nutritional treatment are indicators of quality of care. Knowledge regarding the in-hospital prevalence of malnutrition and nutritional treatment is meagre for Iceland. Design. Pre- and postintervention study. Methods. The study was performed during one day in 2006 (March) and one day in 2007 (April). In total, 95 (89%) and 92 (88%) patients agreed to participate. Moderate/high undernutrition risk was defined as the occurrence of at least two of the following: involuntary weight loss, body mass index below limit and eating difficulties according to Minimal Eating Observation Form - Version II. Being overweight was graded based on body mass index. Specific nutritional care actions were recorded. Intervention: A five-point programme for nutrition and eating was implemented. Results. Moderate/high risk for undernutrition was found in 25 and 17% in the two years (ns, not significant). A high body mass index was found in 53 and 54% (ns). The number of patients with a documented body mass index significantly increased between the two surveys (1 and 30%, p-value < 0 center dot 0005). The use of oral supplements increased from 11-40% (p < 0 center dot 0005) and especially among those at no/low undernutrition risk, with ingestion or deglutition difficulties (p < 0 center dot 0005 in both cases) but not among those with appetite and energy problems (ns). Conclusion. Implementing a nutritional programme does not necessarily affect the number of in-patients with malnutrition, but it is likely to increase the precision of nutritional care to some extent. Relevance to clinical practice. Greater efforts need to be taken to increase the precision of nutritional care among patients at moderate/high undernutrition risk and among those with appetite and energy problems.

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