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  • 1.
    Bringsén, Åsa
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Ejlertsson, Göran
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Människa - Hälsa - Samhälle (MHS).
    Andersson, H. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Flow situations during everyday practice in a medical hospital ward: results from a study based on experience sampling method2011In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 10, p. 3-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing is a constant balance between strain and stimulation and work and health research with a positive reference point has been recommended. A health-promoting circumstance for subjective experience is flow, which is a psychological state, when individuals concurrently experience happiness, motivation and cognitive efficiency. Flow situations can be identified through individuals' estimates of perceived challenge and skills. There is, to the best of our knowledge, no published study of flow among health care staff. The aim of this study was to identify flow-situations and study work-related activities and individual factors associated with flow situations, during everyday practice at a medical emergency ward in Sweden, in order to increase the knowledge on salutogenic health-promoting factors.The respondents consisted of 17 assistant nurses and 14 registered nurses, who randomly and repeatedly answered a small questionnaire, through an experience sampling method, during everyday nursing practice. The study resulted in 497 observations. Flow situations were defined as an exact match between a high challenge and skill estimation and logistic regression models were used to study different variables association to flow situations.The health care staff spent most of its working time in individual nursing care and administrative and communicative duties. The assistant nurses were more often occupied in individual nursing care, while the registered nurses were more involved in medical care and administrative and communicative duties. The study resulted in 11.5% observations of flow situations but the relative number of flow situations varied between none to 55% among the participants. Flow situations were positively related to medical care activities and individual cognitive resources. Taking a break was also positively associated with flow situations among the assistant nurses.The result showed opportunities for work-related interventions, with an adherent increase in flow situations, opportunity for experience of flow and work-related health among the nursing staff in general and among the assistant nurses in particular.

  • 2.
    Jakobsson, Liselotte
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    Persson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    Lundqvist, Pia
    Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Lund.
    Daily life and life quality 3 years following prostate cancer treatment2013In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 12, p. 11-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of experiences from prostate cancer is sparse in a longitudinal perspective. From a nursing perspective, results from combined qualitative and quantitative studies are lacking however would present the broadest knowledge base for best practice. Present descriptions of medical-physical symptoms such as urinary, bowel and sexual dysfunction from quantitative inquiries need be complemented with qualitative results. Such knowledge is essential in relation to treatment and communication with patients over the years and not only shortly after surgery.

    METHODS: A longitudinal study was formatted to investigate general and specific health quality and sense of coherence quantitative alterations over three years. A general health quality module (EORTC QLC-C30) and a disease-specific module (EORTC PR-25) were applied for the longitudinal study together with the Orientation to life questionnaire (SOC), measuring a persons' sense of coherence. In order to strengthen reliability and compensate for low participation we used the Directed content analysis for interviewing and analysis. The method allows using findings from earlier research when interviewing along with detecting new areas. Twenty-one men were followed over three years and six of them, in the third year, accepted to be interviewed.

    RESULTS: We found high quality of life ratings and extended the study with follow-up interviews in year three, to investigate whether questionnaire results were in line with interview findings. We found high life quality and functioning ratings that were in line with qualitative descriptions. Interview analysis showed retrieval of life as lived before, yet in a different way, the men never forgot the diagnosis event, had a unique illness history worth hearing, and had come to terms with most treatment-related shortcomings. Sense of coherence ratings were medium to high and confirmed stability over time in comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness after prostate cancer treatment.

    CONCLUSIONS: Over the years, the men's negative experiences from shifted into 'a good life' though in a different way than before. The interpretation is supported in the study by quantitative results showing a high degree of functioning. The men's sense of coherence seamed to support their handling of life three years after prostate cancer treatment.

  • 3.
    Khalaf, Atika
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm.
    Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M.
    King Saud University, Riyadh.
    Berggren, Vanja
    Lund University.
    Nurses' views and experiences of caring for malnourished patients in surgical settings in Saudi Arabia: a qualitative study2014In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 13, p. 29-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although the occurrence of malnutrition in hospitals is a growing concern, little is known about how hospital staff understand the care that nurses provide to patients with malnutrition. The purpose of this study was to explore nurses' views and experiences of caring for malnourished patients in Saudi Arabia (KSA).

    METHODS: Using a qualitative explorative design, fifteen nurses were interviewed as part of a purposive sample hospital staff. The transcripts were analyzed using latent content analysis.

    RESULTS: The nurses spontaneously and consistently linked malnutrition with physical inactivity. The two main categories, which emerged, were: 'Potentials for nurses to provide good nutrition and physical activity', and 'Having the ability but not the power to promote proper nutrition and physical activity'. These arose from the subcategories: Good nursing implies providing appropriate health education; Acknowledging the Mourafiq (sitter) as a potential resource for the nursing, but also as a burden; Inadequate control and lack of influence; Cultural diversity and lack of dialog; and Views of women's weight gain in KSA society.

    CONCLUSIONS: The nurses felt they have the capacity and passion to further improve the nutrition and activity of their patients, but obstacles in the health care system are impeding these ambitions. The implications for nursing practice could be acknowledgement of the nurses' views in the clinical practice; culturally adjusted care, improved communication and enhanced language skills.

  • 4.
    Törnquist Agosti, Madelaine
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Människa - Hälsa - Samhälle (MHS).
    Andersson, Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Människa - Hälsa - Samhälle (MHS). Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Ejlertsson, Göran
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Människa - Hälsa - Samhälle (MHS).
    Janlöv, Ann-Christin
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Shift work to balance everyday life: a salutogenic nursing perspective in home help service in Sweden2015In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 2-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nurses in Sweden have a high absence due to illness and many retire before the age of sixty. Factors at work as well as in private life may contribute to health problems. To maintain a healthy work–force there is a need for actions on work-life balance in a salutogenic perspective. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of resources in everyday life to balance work and private life among nurses in home help service.

    Methods: Thirteen semi-structured individual interviews and two focus group interviews were conducted with home help service nurses in Sweden. A qualitative content analysis was used for the analyses.

    Result: In the analyses, six themes of perceptions of recourses in everyday life emerged; (i) Reflecting on life. (ii) Being healthy and taking care of yourself. (iii) Having a meaningful job and a supportive work climate. (iv) Working shifts and part time. (v) Having a family and a supporting network. (vi) Making your home your castle.

    Conclusions: The result points out the complexity of work-life balance and support that the need for nurses to balance everyday life differs during different phases and transitions in life. In this salutogenic study, the result differs from studies with a pathogenic approach. Shift work and part time work were seen as two resources that contributed to flexibility and a prerequisite to work-life balance. To have time and energy for both private life and work was seen as essential. To reflect on and discuss life gave inner strength to set boundaries and to prioritize both in private life and in work life. Managers in nursing contexts have a great challenge to maintain and strengthen resources which enhance the work-life balance and health of nurses. Salutogenic research is needed to gain an understanding of resources that enhance work-life balance and health in nursing contexts.

  • 5.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Norberg, Erika
    Central Hospital, Kristianstad.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Diagnostic performance of the Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form – Version II (MEONF-II) and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) among hospital inpatients – a cross-sectional study2011In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 10, p. 24-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The usefulness of the nutritional screening tool Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form – Version II (MEONF-II) relative to Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) remains untested. Here we attempted to fill this gap by testing the diagnostic performance and user-friendliness of the MEONF-II and the NRS 2002 in relation to the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) among hospital inpatients. Methods: Eighty seven hospital inpatients were assessed for nutritional status with the 18- item MNA (considered as the gold standard), and screened with the NRS 2002 and the MEONF-II. Results: The MEONF-II sensitivity (0.61), specificity (0.79), and accuracy (0.68) were acceptable. The corresponding figures for NRS 2002 were 0.37, 0.82 and 0.55, respectively. MEONF-II and NRS 2002 took five minutes each to complete. Assessors considered MEONF-II instructions and items to be easy to understand and complete (96- 99%), and the items to be relevant (87%). For NRS 2002, the corresponding figures were 75-93% and 79%, respectively. Conclusions: The MEONF-II is an easy to use, relatively quick and sensitive screening tool to assess risk of undernutrition among hospital inpatients. With respect to user-friendliness and sensitivity the MEONF-II seems to perform better than the NRS 2002, although larger studies are needed for firm conclusions. The different scoring systems for undernutrition appear to identify overlapping but not identical patient groups. A potential limitation with the study is that the MNA was used as gold standard among patients younger than 65 years.

  • 6.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Torfadóttir, Olina
    Akureyri University Hospital.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Inter- and intrarater reliability of Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form - version II (MEONF-II) nurse assessments among hospital inpatients2014In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 13, p. 18-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition form - version II (MEONF - II) is a recently developed nursing nutritional screening tool. However, its inter- and intrarater reliability has not been assessed.

    METHODS: Inpatients (n = 24; median age, 69 years; 11 women) were assessed by eight nurses (interrater reliability, two nurses scored each patient independently) using the MEONF-II on two consecutive days (intrarater reliability, each patient was scored by the same nurse day 1 and day 2).

    RESULTS: Six patients were at moderate/high undernutrition risk. Inter- and intrarater reliabilities (Gwet's agreement coefficient) for the MEONF-II 2-category classification (no/low risk versus moderate/high risk) were 0.93 and 0.81; for the 3-category classification (no/low - moderate - high risk) reliabilities (Gwet's weighted agreement coefficient) were 0.98 and 0.88; and total score inter- and intrarater reliabilities (intraclass correlation) were 0.92 and 0.84.

    CONCLUSION: Reliability of MEONF-II nurse assessments among adult hospital inpatients was supported and the tool can be used in research and clinical practice.

1 - 6 of 6
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