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  • 1.
    Bengtsson Tops, Anita
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Ehliasson, Kent
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Victimization in individuals suffering from psychosis: a Swedish cross-sectional study2012In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 23-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the study were to investigate: (1) self-reported adulthood and last-year victimization in male and female outpatients suffering from psychosis; (2) relationships to perpetrators; (3) whether drugs or alcohol were involved in victimization situations; (4) places where victimization occurred. Patients were randomly selected from five outpatient units geared to patients with psychosis; 174 patients participated in a structured face-to-face interview. Experiences of victimization in adulthood were reported by 67%, 33% in the previous year. During adulthood 51% had been physically and 32% sexually victimized and 39% threatened. In the previous year 21% reported threats, 20% physical and 15% sexual victimization. Women reported greater exposure to physical and sexual victimization than men during adulthood and in the previous year. Strangers and acquaintances were mainly reported as perpetrators and half (55%) of those victimized in the previous year stated no involvement of alcohol or drugs. Victimization mainly occurred in the patients' own home (59%), outside downtown (34%), or in others homes (38%). The results of this study give reason to highlight the importance for research and clinical practices to adopt a broad frame of interpretation concerning victimization in patients, covering both individual and environmental factors.

  • 2.
    Berg, Agneta
    et al.
    Lunds University, Centre of Caring Sciences.
    Hallberg, Ingalill R.
    Lunds University, Centre of Caring Sciences.
    Effects from systematic clinical supervision on psychiatric nurses' sense of coherence, creativity, work related strain and job satisfaction: a pre-post design1999In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 371-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are few investigations of the type and the outcome of interventions aimed at supporting nurses caring for psychiatric patients. Therefore a prepost–test design study was used in which 22 psychiatric nurses, on a general psychiatric ward were examined before, during and after one year of systematic clinical supervision combined with supervised documented, planned, individualized care. The methods used were the Sense of Coherence scale (SOC), the Creative Climate Questionnaire (CCQ), the Work-Related Strain Inventory and 34 statements from the Satisfaction with Nursing Care and Work Questionnaire (SNCW). In addition 14 statements were developed to evaluate the nurses' view of the effects from clinical supervision. The baseline values for the CCQ indicated a stagnant organization and a high score in the conflict dimension indicated personal and emotional tensions within the organization. The intervention led to a significantly increased creative and innovative climate in the dimensions for trust, idea time and reduced conflicts. However, the organizational climate remained stagnant. The nurses' view of the effects from clinical supervision also increased significantly. There were no significant changes in the nurses' SNCW, WRSI or SOC score. The result of the correlation analysis indicated that a strong sense of coherence was related to low work-related strain but not to unsatisfactory working conditions/milieu. The results gave some support to the idea that systematic clinical supervision and supervised nursing care plans constitute one type of support strategy that improves creativity and the organizational climate. It may, not, however, buffer for interpersonal problems. Further research is required to explore the need for and effects of various support systems depending on the circumstances in the organization.

  • 3.
    Berg, Agneta
    et al.
    The Department of Nursing, Lund University.
    Hallberg R., Ingalill
    The Department of Nursing, Lund University.
    Psychiatric nurses' lived experiences of working with in-patient care on a general team psychiatric ward2000In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 323-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To reveal the meaning of being a nurse working with inpatient care on a team psychiatric ward in Sweden, 22 psychiatric nurses were interviewed and the transcribed texts were analysed by means of latent content analysis. Three themes emerged from the analysis: developing a working relationship with the patient in everyday caregiving; encountering and handling the unforseeable in daily living; and struggling with professional independence and dependency. Developing a working relationship with the patient in everyday caregiving meant that the nurse–patient relationship was the foundation of the caregiving and included being with, as well as doing for, and with, the patient. Four different approaches in daily caregiving were revealed: networking, teaching, containing and protecting. The nurses' approaches in the nurse–patient relationship alternated between being an 'expert' and a 'collaborator'. Encountering and handling unforeseeable situations meant that the nurses were exposed to and had to be prepared for unpredictable situations where they were on their own, handling sometimes strong emotional reactions and relying on their own ability to act. Struggling with professional independence and dependency meant that the nurses seemed to lack professional confidence, although they had many responsibilities, but also less authority to decide about overall care planning. Contextual aspects such as organizational hindrance, unsatisfactory work-environment and co-operation difficulties were illuminated. The result indicates the need for a stable and predictable organizational structure if nurses are to manage the demanding nurse–patient relationships that everyday caregiving requires. A question highlighted by this study is whether multidisciplinary team organization has been effectively developed in Sweden, as uncertainty about the roles and responsibilities of nurses was apparent.

  • 4.
    Nilsson, Gabriella
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson Tops, Anita
    Department of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University.
    Persson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Childhood abuse in Swedish female users of psychiatric services2005In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 365-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:  The aims of this study were to investigate: (1) the prevalence of childhood abuse in women admitted to psychiatric services in a county in the south of Sweden; (2) who the perpetrators were; and (3) the women's self-reported consequences of childhood abuse.

    Method:  The study had a cross-sectional design and was a part of a more comprehensive study. An anonymous self-reported questionnaire was used which included both closed and open-ended questions. The data material were analysed by means of descriptive statistics, Mann–Whitney U-test and manifest content analysis.

    Results:  The total number of women who participated in the study was 259, 51% of whom reported experiences of abuse during childhood, with 53% of these having been exposed to more than one type of abuse. The most frequent perpetrator was the woman's parents; mainly the fathers but also the mothers turned out to be frequent perpetrators of abuse. Some 75% of the women reported current psychological problems in adulthood related to abuse in childhood. According to a manifest content analysis, five themes of self-reported psychological problems emerged: psychiatric problems, shortcomings in social relations, poor self-confidence, fears and bad memories.

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