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  • 1.
    Andersson, H. Ingemar
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle.
    Increased mortality among individuals with chronic widespread pain relates to lifestyle factors: a prospective population-based study2009Inngår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, s. 1-8Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. Widespread chronic pain has been related to disability and loss of quality of life, but in a few epidemiological studies also to increased mortality. The aim of this study was to further investigate the relationship between chronic pain, lifestyle factors and all cause mortality. Methods. A random sample of an adult (age 25-74) Swedish population (n = 1609) responded to a comprehensive questionnaire on pain, other symptoms, lifestyle, work and socioeconomic factors in 1988. Mortality data for this cohort between 1988 and 2002 were analysed. Survival analysis (Kaplan-Meier) and Cox proportional regression were used to study initially reported factors influencing survival. Results. Individuals with widespread chronic pain showed an increased mortality risk (hazard ratio, HR = 1.95, CI: 1.26-3.03) compared to the group without chronic pain. Death due to cardiovascular disease accounted for the increased mortality. Adjustment for lifestyle factors eliminated the excess risk. Conclusions. Increased mortality among individuals with widespread chronic pain is related to factors like smoking, sleep disturbances and low physical activity. The result emphasises the importance of including lifestyle factors in a cognitive-behavioural rehabilitation process. It remains to be shown whether health promotion activities aimed at lifestyle could change mortality among individuals with chronic pain.

  • 2.
    Augustine, Lilly
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för hälsovetenskap, Forskningsmiljön Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Psykologi. Jönköping University.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Jönköping University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University.
    Linking youths' mental, psychosocial, and emotional functioning to ICF-CY: lessons learned2017Inngår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, nr 19, s. 2293-2299Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Linking ready-made questionnaires to codes within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version with the intention of using the information statistically for studying mental health problems can pose several challenges. Many of the constructs measured are latent, and therefore, difficult to describe in single codes. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss challenges encountered in this coding process.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire from a Swedish research programme was linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version and the agreement was assessed.

    RESULTS: Including the original aim of the questionnaire into the coding process was found to be very important for managing the coding of the latent constructs of the items. Items from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version chapters with narrow definitions for example mental functions, were more easily translated to meaningful concepts to code, while broadly defined chapters, such as interactions and relationships, were more difficult.

    CONCLUSION: This study stresses the importance of a clear, predefined coding scheme as well as the importance of not relying too heavily on common linking rules, especially in cases when it is not possible to use multiple codes for a single item. Implications for rehabilitation The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, is a useful tool for merging assessment data from several sources when documenting adolescents' mental functioning in different life domains. Measures of mental health are often based on latent constructs, often revealed in the description of the rationale/aim of a measure. The latent construct should be the primary focus in linking information. By mapping latent constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, users of the classification can capture a broad range of areas relevant to everyday functioning in adolescents with mental health problems. The subjective experience of participation, i.e., the level of subjective involvement, is not possible to code into the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version. However, when linking mental health constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version codes, the two dimensions of participation (the being there, and the level of involvement) need to be separated in the linking process. This can be performed by assigning codes focusing on being there as separate from items focusing on the subjective experience of involvement while being there.

  • 3.
    Behm, Lina
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Zidén, Lena
    University of Gothenburg.
    Dunér, Anna
    University of Gothenburg.
    Falk, Kristin
    University of Gothenburg.
    Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve
    University of Gothenburg.
    Multi-professional and multi-dimensional group education--a key to action in elderly persons.2013Inngår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 35, nr 5, s. 427-35Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study was intended to evaluate a multi-professional health-promoting and disease-preventive intervention organized as multi-professional senior group meetings, which addressed home-dwelling, independently living, cognitively intact elderly persons (80±), by exploring the participants' experiences of the intervention.

    METHOD: The focus group methodology was used to interview a total of 20 participants. The informants had participated in four multi-professional senior group meetings at which information about the ageing process and preventive strategies for enhancing health were discussed.

    RESULTS: The overall finding was that the elderly persons involved in the intervention lived in the present, but that the supportive environment together with learning a preventive approach contributed to the participants' experiencing the senior meetings as a key to action.

    CONCLUSIONS: Elderly persons who are independent may have difficulty accepting information about preventing risks to health. However, group education with a multi-professional approach may be a successful model for achieving an exchange of knowledge, which may possibly empower the participants, give them role models, the opportunity to learn from each other and a sense of sharing problems with people in similar circumstances.

  • 4.
    Edén, Lena
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Andersson, H. Ingemar
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Ejlertsson, Göran
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Människa - Hälsa - Samhälle (MHS).
    Ekström, Britt Inger
    Central Office, Social Insurance Board of Skåne, Kristianstad.
    Johansson, Yvonne
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Leden, Ido
    Rheumatology Section, Department of Medicine, Central Hospital, Kristianstad.
    Characteristics of disability pensioners returning to work: an interview study among individuals with musculoskeletal disorders2007Inngår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 29, nr 22, s. 1720-1726Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To explore adaptation patterns among disability pensioners with musculoskeletal disorders returning to work by means of the Swedish law on 'resting disability pension'. Method. Qualitative analyses of interviews with 17 individuals going back to work. Results. Three adaptation patterns were identified: The Go- getter, the Realist and the Indifferent. These differed regarding influence factors, own expectations, motive, morals and mentality. Conclusion. Several actors may support a return to work for individuals who received a disability pension due to musculoskeletal disorders. In order to succeed, however, it is essential that the disability pensioner is motivated for a reconstruction of his/ her life.

  • 5.
    Sjödahl Hammarlund, Catharina
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för hälsovetenskap, Forskningsmiljön PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Lund University.
    Lexell, Jan
    Uppsala University .
    Brogårdh, Christina
    Lund University.
    Growing up with a disability following paralytic poliomyelitis: experiences from persons with late effects of polio2019Inngår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe the experiences of growing up after acute paralytic poliomyelitis and strategies used to adapt to the new situation. Methods: Seven women and seven men (mean age 70 years, min-max 61-78 years) with late effects of polio, who had contracted paralytic polio in their childhood. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by systematic text condensation. Results: Memories of contracting acute paralytic poliomyelitis involved being immobilized and sent away from home for surgical and physiotherapeutic treatment. Growing up in a social context that was often tough and unfriendly resulted in the development of strategies, such as optimistic thinking, trying to blend in, trusting one's ability to manage, and to handle the preconceptions and expectations of others. At the onset of late effects of polio, some of these strategies were still functioning, whereas overachieving, disregarding pain, and weariness were not. Conclusion: The challenges of growing up with a disability following paralytic polio led to the development of various psychological strategies for managing daily life. By understanding these experiences and strategies, knowledge may be gained in assisting rehabilitation professionals to better support persons with late effects of polio in adapting to the new situation. Implications for rehabilitation At the onset of late effects of polio, strategies developed earlier in life, such as overachieving, disregarding pain, and weariness, may not function anymore. Understanding the experiences of growing up with poliomyelitis can support rehabilitation professionals to provide targeted interventions for people with late effects of polio and enable them to develop new adaptive strategies. Developing new strategies, such as accepting increased symptoms, and augmenting self-esteem and self-efficacy, may improve daily functioning among people with late effects of polio.

  • 6.
    Zidén, Lena
    et al.
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology/Physiotherapy, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Hansson Scherman, Marianne
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology/Physiotherapy, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Wenestam, Claes-Goran
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för Lärarutbildning.
    The break remains: elderly people's experiences of a hip fracture 1 year after discharge2010Inngår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, nr 2, s. 103-113Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To explore experienced long-term consequences of a hip fracture and conceptions of what influences hip fracture recovery among community-living elderly people 1 year after discharge. Method. Fifteen subjects (13 females and 2 males), aged 66-94, were interviewed. The phenomenographic method was used for analysis. Results. Experiences of insecurity and restricted life dominated the interviews. The descriptive categories within experienced consequences of a hip fracture were: (1) isolated life with more restricted activity and fewer social contacts, with the two sub-categories (a) more insecure and afraid and (b) more limited ability to move, (2) disappointed and sad that identity and life have changed and (3) satisfied with the situation or feeling even better than before the fracture. The categories within conceptions of what influences hip fracture recovery were: (4) own mind and actions influence recovery, (5) treatment and actions from others influence recovery and (6) you cannot influence recovery. Conclusion. The findings accentuate that the negative consequences of a hip fracture are substantial and long-lasting. As it strikes mostly elderly people, who may have experienced earlier losses and growing disabilities, a hip fracture could add to the risk of losing important life values. Furthermore, the findings indicate that all health care professionals who meet the patients need to consider the patients' own experiences and possible fear and not merely focus on the physical injury and disabilities.

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