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  • 1.
    Angelstam, Per
    et al.
    Faculty of Forest Sciences, School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg.
    Andersson, Kjell
    Faculty of Forest Sciences, School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg.
    Annerstedt, Matilda
    Department of Work Science, Business Economics & Environmental Psychology, Faculty of Landscape Planning, Horticulture and Agricultural Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp.
    Axelsson, Robert
    Faculty of Forest Sciences, School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg.
    Elbakidze, Marine
    Faculty of Forest Sciences, School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg.
    Garrido Rodriquez, Pablo
    Faculty of Forest Sciences, School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg.
    Grahn, Patrik
    Department of Work Science, Business Economics & Environmental Psychology, Faculty of Landscape Planning, Horticulture and Agricultural Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Pedersen, Simen
    Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Faculty of Applied Ecology and Agricultural Sciences, Hedmark University College, Evenstad.
    Schlyter, Peter
    Environmental and Resource, Dynamics Group, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University.
    Skärbäck, Erik
    Department of Work Science, Business Economics & Environmental Psychology, Faculty of Landscape Planning, Horticulture and Agricultural Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp.
    Smith, Mike
    Forest Research, Northern Research Station, Centre for Human and Ecological Sciences, Roslin.
    Stjernquist, Ingrid
    Environmental and Resource, Dynamics Group, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University.
    Solving problems in social-ecological systems: definition, practice and barriers of transdisciplinary research2013In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 254-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Translating policies about sustainable development as a social process and sustainability outcomes into the real world of social-ecological systems involves several challenges. Hence, research policies advocate improved innovative problem-solving capacity. One approach is transdisciplinary research that integrates research disciplines, as well as researchers and practitioners. Drawing upon 14 experiences of problem-solving, we used group modeling to map perceived barriers and bridges for researchers' and practitioners' joint knowledge production and learning towards transdisciplinary research. The analysis indicated that the transdisciplinary research process is influenced by (1) the amount of traditional disciplinary formal and informal control, (2) adaptation of project applications to fill the transdisciplinary research agenda, (3) stakeholder participation, and (4) functional team building/development based on self-reflection and experienced leadership. Focusing on implementation of green infrastructure policy as a common denominator for the delivery of ecosystem services and human well-being, we discuss how to diagnose social-ecological systems, and use knowledge production and collaborative learning as treatments.

  • 2.
    Beery, Thomas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Raymond, Christopher M
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Kyttä, Marketta
    Finland.
    Olafsson, Anton Stahl
    Danmark.
    Plieninger, Tobias
    Danmark.
    Sandberg, Mattias
    Gothenburg University.
    Stenseke, Marie
    Gothenburg University.
    Tengö, Maria
    Stockholm Resilience Center.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Fostering incidental experiences of nature through green infrastructure planning2017In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 717-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concern for a diminished human experience of nature and subsequent decreased human well-being is addressed via a consideration of green infrastructure's potential to facilitate unplanned or incidental nature experience. Incidental nature experience is conceptualized and illustrated in order to consider this seldom addressed aspect of human interaction with nature in green infrastructure planning. Special attention has been paid to the ability of incidental nature experience to redirect attention from a primary activity toward an unplanned focus (in this case, nature phenomena). The value of such experience for human well-being is considered. The role of green infrastructure to provide the opportunity for incidental nature experience may serve as a nudge or guide toward meaningful interaction. These ideas are explored using examples of green infrastructure design in two Nordic municipalities: Kristianstad, Sweden, and Copenhagen, Denmark. The outcome of the case study analysis coupled with the review of literature is a set of sample recommendations for how green infrastructure can be designed to support a range of incidental nature experiences with the potential to support human well-being.

  • 3. Callaghan, Terry V.
    et al.
    Tweedie, Craig E.
    Akerman, Jonas
    Andrews, Christopher
    Bergstedt, Johan
    Butler, Malcolm G.
    Christensen, Torben R.
    Cooley, Dorothy
    Dahlberg, Ulrika
    Danby, Ryan K.
    Daniels, Fred J. A.
    de Molenaar, Johannes G.
    Dick, Jan
    Mortensen, Christian Ebbe
    Ebert-May, Diane
    Emanuelsson, Urban
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Uppsala.
    Eriksson, Hakan
    Hedenas, Henrik
    Henry, Greg. H. R.
    Hik, David S.
    Hobbie, John E.
    Jantze, Elin J.
    Jaspers, Cornelia
    Johansson, Cecilia
    Johansson, Margareta
    Johnson, David R.
    Johnstone, Jill F.
    Jonasson, Christer
    Kennedy, Catherine
    Kenney, Alice J.
    Keuper, Frida
    Koh, Saewan
    Krebs, Charles J.
    Lantuit, Hugues
    Lara, Mark J.
    Lin, David
    Lougheed, Vanessa L.
    Madsen, Jesper
    Matveyeva, Nadya
    McEwen, Daniel C.
    Myers-Smith, Isla H.
    Narozhniy, Yuriy K.
    Olsson, Håkan
    Pohjola, Veijo A.
    Price, Larry W.
    Riget, Frank
    Rundqvist, Sara
    Sandstroem, Anneli
    Tamstorf, Mikkel
    Van Bogaert, Rik
    Villarreal, Sandra
    Webber, Patrick J.
    Zemtsov, Valeriy A.
    Multi-Decadal Changes in Tundra Environments and Ecosystems: Synthesis of the International Polar Year-Back to the Future Project (IPY-BTF)2011In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 705-716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the responses of tundra systems to global change has global implications. Most tundra regions lack sustained environmental monitoring and one of the only ways to document multi-decadal change is to resample historic research sites. The International Polar Year (IPY) provided a unique opportunity for such research through the Back to the Future (BTF) project (IPY project #512). This article synthesizes the results from 13 papers within this Ambio Special Issue. Abiotic changes include glacial recession in the Altai Mountains, Russia; increased snow depth and hardness, permafrost warming, and increased growing season length in sub-arctic Sweden; drying of ponds in Greenland; increased nutrient availability in Alaskan tundra ponds, and warming at most locations studied. Biotic changes ranged from relatively minor plant community change at two sites in Greenland to moderate change in the Yukon, and to dramatic increases in shrub and tree density on Herschel Island, and in sub-arctic Sweden. The population of geese tripled at one site in northeast Greenland where biomass in non-grazed plots doubled. A model parameterized using results from a BTF study forecasts substantial declines in all snowbeds and increases in shrub tundra on Niwot Ridge, Colorado over the next century. In general, results support and provide improved capacities for validating experimental manipulation, remote sensing, and modeling studies.

  • 4.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Institutet för Skoglig Zooekologi, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, Umeå.
    Threats to boreal frogs1993In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 254-255Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    et al.
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gauthier-Clerc, Michel
    Centre de Recherche de la Tour du Valat Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Massez, Grégoire
    Les Marais du Vigueirat Mas Thibert, Arles .
    Hearn, Richard
    Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, Slimbridge, Gloucester.
    Champagnon, Jocelyn
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles .
    Simon, Géraldine
    Centre de Recherche de la Tour du Valat Le Sambuc, Arles .
    Wintering French mallard and teal are heavier and in better body condition than 30 years ago: effects of a changing environment?2010In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 170-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal populations are exposed to large-scale anthropogenic impact from e.g. climate change, habitat alteration and supplemental stocking. All of these may affect body condition in wintering dabbling ducks, which in turn may affect an individual's survival and reproductive success. The aim of this study was to assess whether there have been morphometric changes in Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and Teal (Anas crecca) over the last 30 years at a major wintering site. Body mass and condition increased from the 1950s-1960s to the 2000s in both species. The increase in body mass amounted to as much as 11.7%, with no corresponding change in body size. Improved body condition was maintained from early to mid-winter, but then converged with historical values for late winter. Our interpretation is that increasingly benign ambient winter conditions permit ducks to maintain better energetic "safety margins" throughout winter, and that converging spring departure values may be related to evolutionary flight energetic optima. The observed changes are consistent with large-scale climate amelioration and local/regional habitat improvement (both anthropogenic).

  • 6.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Section for Zoonotic Ecology and Epidemiology, School of Natural Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Trends in body mass of ducks over time: the hypotheses in Guillemain et al. revisited2011In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 338-340Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Hedenas, Henrik
    et al.
    Carlsson, Bengt A.
    Emanuelsson, Urban
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Uppsala.
    Headley, Alistair D.
    Jonasson, Christer
    Svensson, Brita M.
    Callaghan, Terry V.
    Changes Versus Homeostasis in Alpine and Sub-Alpine Vegetation Over Three Decades in the Sub-Arctic2012In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 41, p. 187-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant species distributions are expected to shift and diversity is expected to decline as a result of global climate change, particularly in the Arctic where climate warming is amplified. We have recorded the changes in richness and abundance of vascular plants at Abisko, sub-Arctic Sweden, by re-sampling five studies consisting of seven datasets; one in the mountain birch forest and six at open sites. The oldest study was initiated in 1977–1979 and the latest in 1992. Total species number increased at all sites except for the birch forest site where richness decreased. We found no general pattern in how composition of vascular plants has changed over time. Three species, Calamagrostis lapponica, Carex vaginata and Salix reticulata, showed an overall increase in cover/frequency, while two Equisetum taxa decreased. Instead, we showed that the magnitude and direction of changes in species richness and composition differ among sites.

  • 8.
    Lindahl, Odd
    et al.
    Kristineberg Marine Research Station.
    Hart, Rob
    SLU, Uppsala.
    Hernroth, Bodil
    Kristineberg Marine Research Station.
    Kollberg, Sven
    Kristineberg Marine Research Station.
    Loo, Lars-Ove
    Göteborg University, Tjärnö Marine Biological Laboratory.
    Olrog, Lars
    Naturbruksgymnasiet i Dingle.
    Rehnstam-Holm, Ann-Sofi
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Svensson, Jonny
    Thalassos Computations, Lindome.
    Svensson, Susanne
    Tjärnö Marine Biological Laboratory.
    Syversen, Ulf
    Østfold Sustainable Development.
    Improving marine water quality by mussel farming: a profitable solution for Swedish society2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 131-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eutrophication of coastal waters is a serious environmental problem with high costs for society globally. In eastern Skagerrak, reductions in eutrophication are planned through reduction of nitrogen inputs, but it is unclear how this can be achieved. One possible method is the cultivation of filter-feeding organisms, such as blue mussels, which remove nitrogen while generating seafood, fodder and agricultural fertilizer, thus recycling nutrients from sea to land. The expected effect of mussel farming on nitrogen cycling was modeled for the Gullmar Fjord on the Swedish west coast and it is shown that the net transport of nitrogen (sum of dissolved and particulate) at the fjord mouth was reduced by 20%. Existing commercial mussel farms already perform this service for free, but the benefits to society could be far greater. We suggest that rather than paying mussel farmers for their work that nutrient trading systems are introduced to improve coastal waters. In this context an alternative to nitrogen reduction in the sewage treatment plant in Lysekil community through mussel farming is presented. Accumulation of bio-toxins has been identified as the largest impediment to further expansion of commercial mussel farming in Sweden, but the problem seems to be manageable through new techniques and management strategies. On the basis of existing and potential regulations and payments, possible win-win solutions are suggested.

  • 9.
    Rehnstam-Holm, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Hernroth, Bodil
    Kristineberg Marine Research Station.
    Shellfish and public health: a Swedish perspective2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 139-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bivalves are ancient animals that feed by filtering large volumes of water. In this way, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses from the water column are greatly concentrated in the mussels. The hazards associated with the consumption of mussels are thus dependent on the occurrence and composition of toxic algae and human microbial pathogens in the areas where shellfish are grown. Diarrheic shellfish toxins have occurred regularly in Sweden during the past 27 years. Peaks of toxins in mussels are mostly recorded from October to December, but the pattern can differ significantly due to location and year, making it hard to predict toxin levels in mussels. With an expansion of aquaculture and a subsequent increase in seafood consumption, better risk management is needed to minimize the effects on humans of algal toxins and human pathogens. New control strategies that have to be implemented are: i) proper site selection of culture installations; ii) regular and cost-efficient monitoring of algae, bacteria and viruses; iii) new indicators for fecal contamination, suitable for the specific locations where shellfish grow; iv) rapid dissemination of information to the industry and public, including risk assessment and advice on how to cope with the situation.

  • 10.
    Richnau, Gustav
    et al.
    Landscape Management, Design and Construction, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp.
    Angelstam, Per
    Faculty of Forest Sciences, School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg.
    Valasiuk, Sviataslau
    Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    Zahvoyska, Lyudmyla
    Institute of Ecological Economics, Ukrainian National Forestry University, Lviv.
    Axelsson, Robert
    Faculty of Forest Sciences, School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg.
    Elbakidze, Marine
    Faculty of Forest Sciences, School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skinnskatteberg.
    Farley, Joshua
    Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, UVM College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Burlington.
    Jönsson, Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Soloviy, Ihor
    Institute of Ecological Economics, Ukrainian National Forestry University, Lviv.
    Multifaceted value profiles of forest owner categories in south Sweden: the river Helge å catchment as a case study2013In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 188-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forest landscapes provide benefits from a widerange of goods, function and intangible values. But whatare different forest owner categories’ profiles of economicuse and non-use values? This study focuses on the complexforest ownership pattern of the River Helge a ̊catchmentincluding the Kristianstad Vattenrike Biosphere Reserve insouthern Sweden. We made 89 telephone interviews withinformants representing the four main forest owner cate-gories. Our mapping included consumptive and non-con-sumptive direct use values, indirect use values, and non-usevalues such as natural and cultural heritage. While thevalue profiles of non-industrial forest land owners andmunicipalities included all value categories, the forestcompanies focused on wood production, and the SwedishEnvironmental Protection Agency on nature protection. Wediscuss the challenges of communicating different forestowners’ economic value profiles among stakeholders, theneed for a broader suite of forest management systems, andfora for collaborative planning.

  • 11. Rundqvist, Sara
    et al.
    Hedenas, Henrik
    Sandstrom, Anneli
    Emanuelsson, Urban
    Swedish Biodiversity Center, Uppsala.
    Eriksson, Håkan
    Jonasson, Christer
    Callaghan, Terry V.
    Tree and Shrub Expansion Over the Past 34 Years at the Tree-Line Near Abisko, Sweden2011In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 683-692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shrubs and trees are expected to expand in the sub-Arctic due to global warming. Our study was conducted in Abisko, sub-arctic Sweden. We recorded the change in coverage of shrub and tree species over a 32– to 34-year period, in three 50 × 50 m plots; in the alpine-tree-line ecotone. The cover of shrubs and trees (<3.5 cm diameter at breast height) were estimated during 2009–2010 and compared with historical documentation from 1976 to 1977. Similarly, all tree stems (≥3.5 cm) were noted and positions determined. There has been a substantial increase of cover of shrubs and trees, particularly dwarf birch (Betula nana), and mountain birch (Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii), and an establishment of aspen (Populus tremula). The other species willows (Salix spp.), juniper (Juniperus communis), and rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) revealed inconsistent changes among the plots. Although this study was unable to identify the causes for the change in shrubs and small trees, they are consistent with anticipated changes due to climate change and reduced herbivory.

  • 12. Vought, Lena B. M.
    et al.
    Dahl, J
    Pedersen, CL
    Lacoursière, Jean O.
    Nutrient retention in riparian ecotones1994In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 342-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutrient retention mechanisms in riparian buffer strips are reviewed with emphasis on surface runoff and subsurface flows, the main pathways of exchanges between the stream and its surroundings. Unique physical and biogeochemical properties prevailing in these riparian ecotones dictate the flux of water, nutrients and other exogenous substances between the upland areas and the stream. Removal of nutrients from surface inflows is induced by deposition of sediment bound nutrients and exchange of dissolved nutrients with the soil/litter surface. Removal of nitrogen in subsurface flows can partly be explained by vegetation uptake, but the main mechanism for removal is usually denitrification. In channelized streams, the subsurface inflows have, in most cases, been altered to discharges via drainage tiles, with the exchange flows (water leaving and re-entering the open-channel via the stream bed and banks) being greatly decreased. Consequently, to improve nitrogen removal in these systems, these flows have to be intercepted or reestablished either through restoration of the old stream valley or through managed structures in the buffer strips.

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