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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Urban
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Nationellt resurscentrum för fysik, Lunds universitet.
    Pendrill, Anne-Marie
    Lund University.
    Up and down, light and heavy, fast and slow: but where?2019In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 54, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vertical amusement rides let your body experience the tickling sensation of feeling light, but also feeling much heavier than as usual, due to velocity changes as you move up and down. Family rides offer different possibilities to visualize the forces that are experienced by your accelerating body. This paper presents a number of different ways to view and experience the motion in a small vertical amusement ride. A smartphone includes an accelerometer that can provide a graph of the forces acting during the ride. A movie from the smartphone camera lets students recall the motion which can then be analysed in more detail. The complementary representations may help students develop a deeper understanding of the relation between force and motion. The affordances of these different semiotic resources are analysed in some detail. In addition, we discuss responses from a number of students to questions about where you feel light and where you feel heavy. We find that the experience of the body is an underused resource in physics teaching.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Urban
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Nationellt resurscentrum för fysik, Lunds universitet.
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Nationellt resurscentrum för fysik.
    Up and down, light and heavy, fast and slow: but where?2019In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 54, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vertical amusement rides let your body experience the tickling sensation of feeling light, but also feeling much heavier than as usual, due to velocity changes as you move up and down. Family rides offer different possibilities to visualize the forces that are experienced by your accelerating body. This paper presents a number of different ways to view and experience the motion in a small vertical amusement ride. A smartphone includes an accelerometer that can provide a graph of the forces acting during the ride. A movie from the smartphone camera lets students recall the motion which can then be analysed in more detail. The complementary representations may help students develop a deeper understanding of the relation between force and motion. The affordances of these different semiotic resources are analysed in some detail. In addition, we discuss responses from a number of students to questions about where you feel light and where you feel heavy. We find that the experience of the body is an underused resource in physics teaching.

  • 3.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Arvidsson, Åsa
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Heering, Peter
    Germany.
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Lunds universitet.
    Rutherford visits middle school: a case study on how teachers direct attention to the nature of science through a storytelling approach2019In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has long been argued that nature of science (NOS) is an important part of science teaching. In the literature, many different approaches to NOS have been suggested. This article focuses on a storytelling approach, and builds on data from audio recordings from three middle-school (school year 6) classrooms. The three science classes are run by three science teachers who have been introduced to NOS and storytelling during a oneday workshop. These three teachers chose to tell the students a story about Ernest Rutherford. The stories told by the teachers, as well as the whole-class discussions afterwards, are analysed with respect to what NOS aspects were communicated. The results show that many different NOS aspects, such as the tentative nature of scientific models, empirical aspects of the scientific knowledge process, as well as human aspects of science, emerge in the context of the story about Rutherford and his work on the atomic model. The results indicate promising possibilities for storytelling as an approach to NOS teaching.

  • 4.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Lund University.
    Leden, Lotta
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Lund University.
    Working with the nature of science in physics class: turning 'ordinary' classroom situations into nature of science learning situations2016In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 51, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the science education research field there is a large body of literature on the 'nature of science' (NOS). NOS captures issues about what characterizes the research process as well as the scientific knowledge. Here we, in line with a broad body of literature, use a wide definition of NOS including also e.g. socio-cultural aspects. It is argued that NOS issues, for a number of reasons, should be included in the teaching of science/physics. Research shows that NOS should be taught explicitly. There are plenty of suggestions on specific and separate NOS activities, but the necessity of discussing NOS issues in connection to specific science/physics content and to laboratory work, is also highlighted. In this article we draw on this body of literature on NOS and science teaching, and discuss how classroom situations in secondary physics classes could be turned into NOS-learning situations. The discussed situations have been suggested by secondary teachers, during in-service teacher training, as situations from every-day physics teaching, from which NOS could be highlighted.

  • 5.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Leden, Lotta
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Lunds universitet.
    Contemporary science as context for teaching nature of science: teachers’ development of popular science articles as a teaching resource2019In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Ekström, Peter
    Lund University.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Mars, Patrik
    Byskolan, Södra Sandby.
    Ouattara, Lassana
    Lund University.
    Ryan, Ulrika
    Byskolan, Södra Sandby.
    Motion on an inclined plane and the nature of science2014In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 180-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction is an important phenomenon in everyday life. All children are familiar with playground slides, which may thus be a good starting point for investigating friction. Motion on an inclined plane is a standard physics example. This paper presents an investigation of friction by a group of 11-yearolds. How did they plan their investigations? What aspects of friction could they discern? What understanding of the nature of science was revealed—and developed—during their investigation and subsequent discussion with the teacher?

  • 7.
    Pendrill, Ann-marie
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Ekström, Peter
    Lund University.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Mars, Patrik
    Byskolan, Södra Sandby.
    Ouattara, Lassana
    Lund University.
    Ryan, Ulrika
    Byskolan, Södra Sandby.
    The equivalence principle comes to school: falling objects and other middle school investigations2014In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 425-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparing two objects falling together is a small-scale version of Galileo's classical experiment, demonstrating the equivalence between gravitational and inertial mass. We present here investigations by a group of ten-year-olds, who used iPads to record the drops. The movie recordings were essential in the follow-up discussions, enabling the students to compare the different situations and to discern situations where air resistance was essential and where it could be neglected. By considering a number of familiar situations and simple investigations that can be performed, e.g., on a playground, students may come closer to an appreciation of the deep significance of the non-influence of mass on motion under gravity.

  • 8.
    Persson, Jonas
    et al.
    Norge.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Planetarium software in the classroom2016In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 51, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students often find astronomy and astrophysics to be most interesting and exciting, but the Universe is difficult to access using only one's eyes or simple equipment available at different educational settings. To open up the Universe and enhance learning astronomy and astrophysics different planetarium software can be used. In this article we discuss the usefulness of such simulation software and give four examples of how such software can be used for teaching and learning astronomy and astrophysics.

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