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  • 1.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Lekies, Kristi S.
    USA.
    Nature’s services and contributions: the relational value of childhood nature experience and the importance of reciprocity2021In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 9, p. 1-8, article id 636944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People depend on functioning ecosystems to meet human needs and support well-being across the life span. This article considers the interest in ecosystem service valuation, the growing interest in the benefits of nature experience for children, and ways to bridge these perspectives. We focus on embodied childhood nature experiences: the physical and multisensory experiences that intertwine child and nature. Additionally, we highlight the reciprocal quality of nature and child experience relationship as an example of how this relationship goes beyond the instrumental and demonstrates relational value. Underlying this perspective is the belief that children need to be better represented in the perception and action of ecosystem valuation in environmental policy.

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  • 2.
    Beery, Thomas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education. Kristianstad University.
    Quaas, Martin
    Tyskland.
    Stenseke, Marie
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Editorial: Nature's contributions to people: On the relation between valuations and actions2021In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 9, article id 712902Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 3.
    Green, Andy J.
    et al.
    Spanien.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Lovas-Kiss, Adam
    Ungern.
    Beyond scatter-hoarding and frugivory: European corvids as overlooked vectors for a broad range of plants2019In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well-known that some members of the crow family (Corvidae) are important for seed dispersal either via frugivory (e.g., when feeding on berries) or by scatter hoarding (e.g., of nuts). Dispersal via gut passage of seeds within a fleshy fruit can be considered "classical endozoochory." However, corvids are rarely recognized as vectors of plants lacking a fleshy fruit, or a large nut (such as plants with a dry achene, capsule or caryopsis). Dispersal of such seeds via gut passage can be considered "non-classical endozoochory." A century ago, Heintze (1917a,b); Heintze (1918) reported on extensive field studies of seed dispersal by 11 species of European Corvidae. His work is overlooked in contemporary reviews of corvid biology. We resurrect his work, which suggests that contemporary views about seed dispersal by corvids are too narrow. Heintze identified 157 plant taxa from 42 families which were dispersed by corvids by endozoochory, as well as another nine taxa only dispersed by synzoochory (which includes scatter-hoarding). Most (54%) of the plant species dispersed by endozoochory lack a fleshy fruit and have previously been assigned to other dispersal syndromes, mainly associated with wind (10%), self-dispersal (22%) or epizoochory (18%). Plants lacking a fleshy fruit were particularly well-represented from the Caryophyllaceae (12 species), Poaceae (14 species), and Polygonaceae (8 species). Of 27 taxa germinated by Heintze from seeds extracted from corvid pellets or feces (71% of those tested), 20 lack a fleshy fruit. Similarly, of 32 taxa he recorded as seedlings having germinated from pellets in the field, 11 lacked a fleshy fruit. However, Heintze's quantitative data show that classical endozoochory is dominant in Magpies Pica pica and Hooded Crows Corvus cornix, for which 97% of seeds dispersed were fleshy-fruited. Corvids overlap with waterfowl as vectors of terrestrial plants dispersed by non-classical endozoochory, and 56 species are dispersed by both corvids and dabbling ducks according to the lists of Heintze and Soons et al. (2016). Finally, Heintze's data show that corvids were already dispersing alien plants in Europe a century ago, such as the North American Dwarf Serviceberry Amelanchier spicata.

  • 4.
    Salazar, Gabby
    et al.
    USA.
    Monroe, Martha C.
    USA.
    Jordan, Catherine
    USA.
    Ardoin, Nicole M.
    USA.
    Beery, Thomas
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Improving assessments of connection to nature: a participatory approach2021In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 8, no 609104, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiences in nature benefit humans in a variety of ways, including increasing health and well-being, reducing stress, inspiring creativity, enhancing learning, and fostering environmental stewardship values. These experiences help define the relationship people have with nature which is often correlated with a person’s level of environmental concern as well as their engagement in pro-environmental behaviors. A more informed understanding of the ways in which interactions with the natural environment can foster connection to nature requires that we are able to measure our perceived relationship to the environment. Dozens of tools measure people’s connection to nature—the strength of those perceived relationships with the natural world. Although the tools have been primarily developed to answer research questions, practitioners are increasingly interested in understanding whether and in what ways their work— in areas including environmental education, urban planning, and park management, for example—influences people’s connection to nature. In 2018, we launched a participatory process involving researchers and practitioners in a review of existing connection to nature assessment tools with the intention of identifying tools that would be useful to practitioners, as well as defining needs in research. This paper chronicles the process’s outcomes, including a discussion of opportunities for future research.

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