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  • 1.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Persson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    School of Medical and Health Sciences, Örebro University.
    Public home care professionals’ experiences of being involved in food distribution to home-living elderly people in Sweden: a qualitative study with an action research approach2012In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 41-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research focusing on Food Distribution (FD) from various professionals’ and organisational perspectivesare lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to explore various professionals’ experiences of involvement in FD inorder to get comprehensive understanding of the organisation, responsibilities and roles.

    Methods: This qualitative study is a part of a larger project with an action research approach focusing on FD in themunicipal home service and care for home-living elderly persons in a municipality in southern Sweden. The data wascollected through participatory observations (n=90 occasions and in total 480 hours), repeated focus group interviews (n =4) with different professionals (n =10) involved in the FD process and one individual interview. The material was analysedby qualitative manifest and latent content analysis.

    Results: The study indicates that Food Distribution is a fragmentary intervention where a comprehensive perspective andclear roles of responsibility are lacking. The FD organisation seemed to be strictly divided and limited by constraintsregarding time and money. The fragmented organisation led partly to staff only taking responsibility for their part of thechain and no one having the full picture of and responsibility for the FD process, but also to some professionals takingmore responsibility than they were supposed to.

    Conclusions: The aim of the study was met by using an action research approach. The study was however limited by thatno home help officers were represented. The FD appeared as an extremely complex chain of different but connectedactivities. It is not merely the distribution of a product, i.e. the meal box. The fragmentation of FD means that staff onlytakes responsibility for their part of the chain, and that no one has the full picture of or responsibility for the FD process.Consequently, there is a need for an outline of responsibilities. The findings have implications for nursing, gerontology,and in the care for the elderly.

  • 2.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    Hälsoakademin Örebro Universitet.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Persson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    How the professionals can identify needs for improvement and improve food distribution service for the home-living elderly people in Sweden - an action research project2013In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 3, no 8, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Making changes to municipal social care and service has been found to be challenging to realise and highly multifaceted. The aim of this study was to describe how the professionals can identify needs for improvement and improve Food Distribution (FD) service for the home-living elderly people in Sweden.

    Methods: This study is part of a larger project with an action research approach focusing on to municipal FD to older people living in their own home in Sweden. The professionals involved in FD invited the first author to assist them in this process. The study participants were comprised of the following groups: “The Identification focus group” that identified need for improvement of FD (n= 5); “The Action focus group” that planned and choose suitable ‘action’ for improvement (n=5); “The First Evaluation group” (n=4) that evaluated the content of planned improvement and finally “The Second Evaluation group” (n=29) that evaluated the changes following improvement. The data was gathered and analysed by Story Dialogue Method.

    Results: The need to update and increase the FD recipient’s knowledge in nutrition by sending them informative letters was found to be an important area to focus on. The information letters (n=1700) were distributed to the all FD recipients in six municipalities in southern Sweden during April 2011. The results were evaluated during May 2011. The overall general estimation was that the content of the letters indicated that this was a suitable method for gaining information to make a nutrition competence update. Following this, “The Action focus group” decided: firstly, to continue preparing and distributing information letters to all FD recipients to be sent out twice a year, and secondly: to make the information letters accessible on the websites of the six municipalities and county councils involved.

    Conclusions: This study showed that systematic work inspired by an action research approach with motivated and involved participants can be beneficial and a starting point for the process of change in municipal service and care practice. The major conclusion of the study was that systematic reflection over everyday practice can be the vehicle for the future change of practice. The research process and the findings have implications for nursing, care of the elderly and gerontology.

  • 3.
    Samarasinghe, Kerstin
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Arbete i skolan (AiS).
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University.
    Abrahamsson, Agneta
    FoUrum, Research and development unit in county of Jönköping.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    The promotion of family wellness for refugee families in cultural transition: a phenomenographic study2012In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 92-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To illustrate how nurses can promote family wellness and facilitate acculturation for involuntary migrant families as conceptualized by bilingual interpreters and cultural mediators with own past refugee experience.  Due to the nature of involuntary migration and accompanying acculturation, refugee families face a complex transition, exposing them to vulnerability in cohesion and family function. Involuntary migrant health needs are largely managed within the Primary Health Care sector where Primary Health Care Nurses (PHCN) play an important role. Additionally, bilingual interpreters and cultural mediators with personal experience of being refugees and subsequent acculturation play a critical role in bridging the language and cultural gap between migrant families and PHCNs.

    Methods: The study is descriptive and explorative in design with a phenomenographic approach. Data was collected in Southern Sweden utilizing in-depth interviews with ten bilingual interpreters and cultural mediators originating from the Balkans, Kurdistan, Eritrea and Somalia. A contextual analysis with reference to phenomenography was used in interpreting the data material.

    Results: Three separate themes illustrated the meaning of family wellness: a sense of belonging to the new homeland, the maintenance of self-esteem and stable family interrelationships. The analysis demonstrated that the way ex-refugee bilingual interpreters and cultural mediators perceived of how to promote family wellness, fell into three qualitative different conceptions: (1) Promotion of family wellness is the responsibility of the family itself, manifested in its attitude in wanting to adjust to change, (2) Promotion of family wellness is the consideration of those outside the family and is marked by understanding and respectful attitudes, (3) Promotion of family wellness is a societal responsibility to which successful integration is a prerequisite.

    Conclusions: The promotion of health of involuntary migrant families in cultural transition is complex due to families, other members of the society and society at large all contributing to family wellness in the process of acculturation. For nurses to facilitate a healthy transition for involuntary migrant families, a holistic approach working with the entire family in a psychosocial way and cooperating with other health care professionals, community authorities and ethnic organizations maybe a future direction in encounters with involuntary migrant families with health problems. Adopting a family system approach will enable nurses to provide culturally and transition-competent quality care by enabling stabilizing interfamily relationships through supportive conversations about changes and its subsequent reactions and possible coping of the family as a unit. Further research in order to enhance health promotion would preferable take on a participatory approach.

  • 4.
    Westergren, Albert
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Edfors, Ellinor
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Hedin, Gita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Improving nursing students research knowledge through participation in a study about nutrition, its associated factors and assessment2013In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 3, no 8, p. 50-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aims of this study were threefold: 1) to explore nursing students perceptions of knowledge development after participating in an actual research project; 2) to explore undernutrition and its relationship to other clinical factors; 3) to explore the user-friendliness of the Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form (MEONF-II) in relation to dependency in Activities of Daily Living (ADL).

    Methods: A pilot study (Study 1, S1) was conducted in October 2010, including 281 patients. After extending the research protocol a second data collection (S2) was conducted in March 2011, including 236 patients (total n=517). First and third year nursing students (n=188) collected the data, during one day of their clinical practice courses by assessing three patients each in hospitals or nursing homes. Students answered questions about their experiences from participating in the study. Patient related assessments included: MEONF-II; ADL dependency (S1 and S2); insomnia; low-spiritedness; and subjective health (S2). In addition, questions about the user-friendliness of MEONF-II were included (S1 and S2).

    Results: Among the nursing students, 51% experienced that their knowledge about nutrition increased and 67% that their understanding for research increased by participating in the project. Out of the patients, 57% were women, 50% were almost independent, 27% had some dependency, 23% were almost totally dependent in ADL, and 48% were at moderate/ high undernutrition risk. In S2, 32% of patients had insomnia, and 46% experienced low-spiritedness. Dependency in 5-6 and 3-4 ADLs (OR, 2.439 and 2.057, respectively), compared to dependency in 0-2 ADLs, were the strongest predictors for undernutrition risk, followed by insomnia (OR 2.124). Nursing students experienced the MEONF-II as easy to understand (93%), easy to answer (94%) and relevant (94%), and the suggestions for measures to take in case of risk as relevant (95%), independent of the patients’ ADL status.

    Conclusions: By participating in an actual research project nursing students gets an understanding for research and tools for working with quality improvements in their future role as professional nurses. Undernutrition, mental and physical factors constitute coexisting problems in need for further investigation. Nursing students perceive the MEONF-II as user-friendly, independent of patient ADL dependency.

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