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  • 1.
    Beery, Thomas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    From environmental connectedness to sustainable futures: topophilia and human affiliation with nature2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 8837-8854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human affiliation with nonhuman nature is an important dimension of environmental concern and support for pro-environmental attitudes. A significant theory of human connectedness with nature, the Biophilia Hypothesis, suggests that there exists a genetically based inclination for human affiliation with the biological world. Both support and challenge to the Biophilia Hypothesis are abundant in the literature of environmental psychology. One response that both challenges and builds upon the Biophilia Hypothesis is the Topophilia Hypothesis. The Topophilia Hypothesis has extended the ideas of biophilia to incorporate a broader conception of nonhuman nature and a co-evolutionary theory of genetic response and cultural learning. While the Topophilia Hypothesis is a new idea, it is built upon long-standing scholarship from humanistic geography and theories in human evolution. The Topophilia Hypothesis expands previous theory and provides a multidisciplinary consideration of how biological selection and cultural learning may have interacted during human evolution to promote adaptive mechanisms for human affiliation with nonhuman nature via specific place attachment. Support for this possible co-evolutionary foundation for place-based human affiliation with nonhuman nature is explored from multiple vantage points. We raise the question of whether this affiliation may have implications for multifunctional landscape management. Ultimately, we propose that nurturing potential topophilic tendencies may be a useful method to promote sustainable efforts at the local level with implications for the global.

  • 2.
    Normann, Anne
    et al.
    RISE.
    Röding, Magnus
    RISE.
    Wendin, Karin
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för mat- och måltidsvetenskap.
    Sustainable fruit consumption: the influence of color, shape and damage on consumer sensory perception and liking of different apples2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 4626, p. 1-9, article id su11174626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable food production and consumption are currently key issues. About one third of food produced for human consumption is wasted. In developed countries, consumers are responsible for the largest amount of food waste throughout the supply chain. The unwillingness to purchase and consume suboptimal food products is an important cause of food waste, however, the reasons behind this are still insufficiently studied. Our research addresses the question of how combinations of color, shape and damage of apples influence consumer liking and perceived sensory attributes. In a laboratory study based on factorial design of visual appearance (color, shape and damage varied from optimal to suboptimal) a total of 130 consumers evaluated sensory perception of flavor and texture attributes in apple samples. Liking was also evaluated. The results showed a significant difference in liking between an optimal apple and all apple categories with at least two out of three suboptimal properties. Further, it was a clear trend that the optimal apple was perceived as sweeter, crispier, less bitter, and less earthy than all the other apples by the participating consumers, however, the results were not statistically significant. A suboptimal appearance, therefore, had a negative effect on both perception and liking.

  • 3.
    Palmberg, Irmeli
    et al.
    Finland.
    Kärkkäinen, Sirpa
    Finland.
    Jeronen, Eila
    Finland.
    Yli-Panula, Eija
    Finland.
    Persson, Christel
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Nordic student teachers’ views on the most effcient teaching and learning methods for species and species identification2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers need knowledge of species and species identification skills for teaching thestructure and function of ecosystems, and the principles of biodiversity and its role in sustainability.The aim of this study is to analyze Nordic student teachers’ views on the most ecient methodsand strategies to teach and learn species and species identification, and to find some trends abouthow well their views are reflected in a species identification test. Student teachers in Finland,Norway, and Sweden (N = 426) answered a questionnaire consisting of fixed and open-endedquestions, and a species identification test. An analysis of variance, Chi-Square, and t-test were usedfor quantitative data and an inductive content analysis for qualitative data. Results showed thatoutdoor teaching and learning methods are more ecient than indoor methods. The majority ofstudent teachers considered outdoor experiential learning with living organisms as the most ecientteaching and learning method. Student teachers who highlighted outdoor experiential learning andoutdoor project work as their most ecient methods received significantly better results in the speciesidentification test than the others. Field trips and fieldwork were emphasized as the most importantsources in schools and universities, while the Internet was the most important source among media.The student teachers underlined teachers’ expertise in the form of in-depth understanding of subjectsand supervising skills for ecient teaching both outdoors and indoors. Therefore, teaching andlearning of species and species identification as the practical part of biodiversity and sustainabilityeducation is emphasized as an integral part of teacher education programs.

  • 4.
    Tuvendal, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    A handshake between markets and hierarchies: geese as an example of successful collaborative management of ecosystem services2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 15937-15954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important task in research about natural resource management is to communicate the utility of different approaches from various settings. Using ecosystem services as a conceptual frame, we study a local solution to alleviate goose-human conflicts in an agricultural region in Sweden. Increasing goose numbers and crop damage led to the foundation of a goose management group (GMG), comprising landowners, farmers, hunters, ornithologists, conservation NGOs, and local and county level administration. The GMG was not given any formal or legal authority. We asked: is this management solution successful? Which problems can be solved and which remain? Can the GMG stand as a model for management of other species and in other landscapes? We interviewed present members of the GMG and analyzed minutes from its meetings. We found that the GMG has autonomy to self-organize and shows adaptive capacity over time in handling variability and complexity in its socio-ecological system. This makes the GMG a sustainable solution for local management of a resource in which goose population growth and legislation are decided at other (national or international) levels. We assessed what constitutes perceived success and found that GMG is geared toward “mediation of opposing preferences” by establishing a figurative handshake between stakeholders. By comparing how four general challenges in ecosystem service management align with formative attributes of the GMG, we discuss in which ways this management solution is applicable to other ecosystem services in other contexts.

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