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  • 1.
    Beltrán-Pardo, Eliana
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University.
    Harms-Ringdahl, Mats
    Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University.
    Haghdoost, Siamak
    Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University.
    Wojcik, Andrzej
    Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University.
    Tolerance to gamma radiation in the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini from embryo to adult correlate inversely with cellular proliferation2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 7, p. e0133658-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tardigrades are highly tolerant to desiccation and ionizing radiation but the mechanisms of this tolerance are not well understood. In this paper, we report studies on dose responses of adults and eggs of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini exposed to gamma radiation. In adults the LD50/48h for survival was estimated at ~ 4200 Gy, and doses higher than 100 Gy reduced both fertility and hatchability of laid eggs drastically. We also evaluated the effect of radiation (doses 50 Gy, 200 Gy, 500 Gy) on eggs in the early and late embryonic stage of development, and observed a reduced hatchability in the early stage, while no effect was found in the late stage of development. Survival of juveniles from irradiated eggs was highly affected by a 500 Gy dose, both in the early and the late stage. Juveniles hatched from eggs irradiated at 50 Gy and 200 Gy developed into adults and produced offspring, but their fertility was reduced compared to the controls. Finally we measured the effect of low temperature during irradiation at 4000 Gy and 4500 Gy on survival in adult tardigrades, and observed a slight delay in the expressed mortality when tardigrades were irradiated on ice. Since H.dujardini is a freshwater tardigrade with lower tolerance to desiccation compared to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, the high radiation tolerance in adults, similar to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, is unexpected and seems to challenge the idea that desiccation and radiation tolerance rely on the same molecular mechanisms. We suggest that the higher radiation tolerance in adults and late stage embryos of H.dujardini (and in other studied tardigrades) compared to early stage embryos may partly be due to limited mitotic activity, since tardigrades have a low degree of somatic cell division (eutely), and dividing cells are known tobe more sensitive to radiation.

  • 2.
    Beltrán-Pardo, Eliana
    et al.
    Instituto de Genética Humana, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Wojcik, Andrzej
    Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University.
    Haghdoost, Siamak
    Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University.
    Harms-Ringdahl, Mats
    Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University.
    Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa M.
    Departamento de Genética y Biología Molecular, Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados, CINVESTAV, México D.F..
    Bernal Villegas, Jaime E.
    Instituto de Genética Humana, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá.
    Effects of ionizing radiation on embryos of the tardigrade Milnesium cf. tardigradum at different stages of development2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 9, p. e72098-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tardigrades represent one of the most desiccation and radiation tolerant animals on Earth, and several studies havedocumented their tolerance in the adult stage. Studies on tolerance during embryological stages are rare, but differentialeffects of desiccation and freezing on different developmental stages have been reported, as well as dose-dependent effectof gamma irradiation on tardigrade embryos. Here, we report a study evaluating the tolerance of eggs from theeutardigrade Milnesium cf. tardigradum to three doses of gamma radiation (50, 200 and 500 Gy) at the early, middle, andlate stage of development. We found that embryos of the middle and late developmental stages were tolerant to all doses,while eggs in the early developmental stage were tolerant only to a dose of 50 Gy, and showed a declining survival withhigher dose. We also observed a delay in development of irradiated eggs, suggesting that periods of DNA repair might havetaken place after irradiation induced damage. The delay was independent of dose for eggs irradiated in the middle and latestage, possibly indicating a fixed developmental schedule for repair after induced damage. These results show that thetolerance to radiation in tardigrade eggs changes in the course of their development. The mechanisms behind this patternare unknown, but may relate to changes in mitotic activities over the embryogenesis and/or to activation of responsemechanisms to damaged DNA in the course of development.

  • 3.
    Bengtsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Avril, Alexis
    Linnaeus University.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Norevik, Gabriel
    Ottenby Bird Observatory.
    Tolf, Conny
    Linnaeus University.
    Safi, Kamran
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology.
    Fiedler, Wolfgang
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology.
    Wikelski, Martin
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology.
    Olsen, Bjorn
    Uppsala University.
    Waldenstrom, Jonas
    Linnaeus University.
    Movements, home-range size and habitat selection of mallards during autumn migration2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 6, p. e100764-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) is a focal species in game management, epidemiology and ornithology, but comparably little research has focused on the ecology of the migration seasons. We studied habitat use, time-budgets, home-range sizes, habitat selection, and movements based on spatial data collected with GPS devices attached to wild mallards trapped at an autumn stopover site in the Northwest European flyway. Sixteen individuals (13 males, 3 females) were followed for 15-38 days in October to December 2010. Forty-nine percent (SD = 8.4%) of the ducks' total time, and 85% of the day-time (SD = 28.3%), was spent at sheltered reefs and bays on the coast. Two ducks used ponds, rather than coast, as day-roosts instead. Mallards spent most of the night (76% of total time, SD = 15.8%) on wetlands, mainly on alvar steppe, or in various flooded areas (e.g. coastal meadows). Crop fields with maize were also selectively utilized. Movements between roosting and foraging areas mainly took place at dawn and dusk, and the home-ranges observed in our study are among the largest ever documented for mallards (mean = 6,859 ha; SD = 5,872 ha). This study provides insights into relatively unknown aspects of mallard ecology. The fact that autumn-staging migratory mallards have a well-developed diel activity pattern tightly linked to the use of specific habitats has implications for wetland management, hunting and conservation, as well as for the epidemiology of diseases shared between wildlife and domestic animals.

  • 4.
    Bolstad, Ingeborg
    et al.
    KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital.
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital.
    Reckless, Greg E.
    KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital.
    Sigvartsen, Niels P.
    KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital.
    Server, Andres
    Department of Neuroradiology, Oslo University Hospital.
    Jensen, Jimmy
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Aversive event anticipation affects connectivity between the ventral striatum and the orbitofrontal cortex in an fMRI avoidance task2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 6, p. e68494-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ability to anticipate aversive events is important for avoiding dangerous or unpleasant situations. The motivation to avoid an event is influenced by the incentive salience of an event-predicting cue. In an avoidance fMRI task we used tone intensities to manipulate salience in order to study the involvement of the orbitofrontal cortex in processing of incentive salience. In the task, cues predicting either aversive or neutral avoidable tones were presented. Ventral striatum, amygdala and anterior insula activations were significantly stronger during presentation of cues for aversive than neutral tones. A psychophysiological interaction analysis showed stronger connectivity between the ventral striatum and the orbitofrontal cortex during aversive than neutral conditions. The present study shows an interaction between the ventral striatum, a structure previously linked to negative incentive salience, and the orbitofrontal cortex supporting a role for this region in processing salience. In addition, this study replicates previous findings suggesting that the task is robust.

  • 5.
    Czernekova, Michaela
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. Charles University, Prague.
    Janelt, Kamil
    Poland.
    Student, Sebastian
    Poland.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Poprawa, Izabela
    Poland.
    A comparative ultrastructure study of storage cells in the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer in the hydrated state and after desiccation and heating stress2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tardigrades represent an invertebrate phylum with no circulatory or respiratory system.Their body cavity is filled with free storage cells of the coelomocyte-type, which are responsible for important physiological functions. We report a study comparing the ultrastructure of storage cells in anhydrobiotic and hydrated specimens of the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer. We also analysed the effect of temperature stress on storage cell structure. Firstly, we verified two types of ultrastructurally different storage cells, which differ in cellular organelle complexity, amount and content of reserve material and connection to oogenetic stage. Type I cells were found to differ ultrastructurally depending on the oogenetic stage of the animal. The main function of these cells is energy storage. Storage cells of Type I were also observed in the single male that was found among the analysed specimens. The second cell type, Type II, found only in females, represents young undifferentiated cells, possibly stem cells. The two types of cells also differ with respect to the presence of nucleolar vacuoles,which are related to oogenetic stages and to changes in nucleolic activity during oogenesis. Secondly, this study revealed that storage cells are not ultrastructurally affected by six months of desiccation or by heating following this desiccation period. However, heating of the desiccated animals (tuns) tended to reduce animal survival, indicating that longterm desiccation makes these animals more vulnerable to heat stress. We confirmed the degradative pathways during the rehydration process after desiccation and heat stress. Our study is the first to document two ultrastructurally different types of storage cells in tardigrades and reveals new perspectives for further studies of tardigrade storage cells.

  • 6.
    Czernekova, Michaela
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Tjeckien.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Experimentally induced repeated anhydrobiosis in the Eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 11, article id e0164062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tardigrades represent one of the main animal groups with anhydrobiotic capacity at any stage of their life cycle. The ability of tardigrades to survive repeated cycles of anhydrobiosis has rarely been studied but is of interest to understand the factors constraining anhydrobiotic survival. The main objective of this study was to investigate the patterns of survival of the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer under repeated cycles of desiccation, and the potential effect of repeated desiccation on size, shape and number of storage cells. We also analyzed potential change in body size, gut content and frequency of mitotic storage cells. Specimens were kept under non-cultured conditions and desiccated under controlled relative humidity. After each desiccation cycle 10 specimens were selected for analysis of morphometric characteristics and mitosis. The study demonstrates that tardigrades may survive up to 6 repeated desiccations, with declining survival rates with increased numberof desiccations. We found a significantly higher proportion of animals that were unable to contract properly into a tun stage during the desiccation process at the 5th and 6th desiccations. Also total number of storage cells declined at the 5th and 6th desiccations, while no effect on storage cell size was observed. The frequency of mitotic storage cells tended to decline with higher number of desiccation cycles. Our study shows that the number of consecutive cycles of anhydrobiosis that R. coronifer may undergo is limited, with increased inability for tun formation and energetic constraints as possible causal factors.

  • 7.
    Fismen, Anne-Siri
    et al.
    Norge.
    Smith, Otto Robert Frans
    Norge.
    Torsheim, Torbjørn
    Norge.
    Rasmussen, Mette
    Danmark.
    Pedersen Pagh, Trine
    Danmark.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO).
    Ojala, Kristiina
    Finland.
    Samdal, Oddrun
    Norge.
    Trends in food habits and their relation to socioeconomic status among Nordic adolescents 2001/2002-2009/20102016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In the Nordic countries, substantial policy and intervention efforts have been made to increase adolescents' consumption of fruit and vegetables and to reduce their intake of sweets and soft drinks. Some initiatives have been formulated in a Nordic collaboration and implemented at national level. In recent years, social inequalities in food habits have been attracted particular governmental interest and several initiatives addressing the socioeconomic gradient in food habits have been highlighted. However, few internationally published studies have evaluated how trends in adolescents' food habits develop in the context of Nordic nutrition policy, or have compared differences between the Nordic countries.

    Methods

    The study was based on Danish, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish cross-sectional data from the international Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, collected via three nationally representative and comparable questionnaire surveys in 2001/2002, 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. Food habits were identified by students' consumption of fruit, vegetables, sweets and sugar sweetened soft drink. Socioeconomic status (SES) was measured with the Family Affluence Scale (FAS). Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the data.

    Results

    Trends in fruit consumption developed differently across countries, characterized by an increase in Denmark and Norway and more stable trends in Sweden and Finland. Vegetable consumption increased particularly in Denmark and to a lesser extent in Norway, whereas Sweden and Finland displayed stable trends. Decreased trends were observed for sweet and soft drink consumption and were similar in Norway, Sweden and Finland. Sweet consumption decreased across all survey years, whereas soft drink consumption decreased between 2001/2002–2005/2006 and was stable thereafter. Denmark displayed an increase between 2001/2002–2005/2006 followed by a similar decrease between 2005/2006–2009/2010 for both sweet and soft drink consumption. Socioeconomic inequalities in fruit and vegetable consumption were observed in all countries, with no cross-country differences, and no changes over time. Small but not significant cross-country variation was identified for SES inequalities in sweet consumption. Reduced SES inequalities were observed in Sweden between 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. SES was not associated with soft drink consumption in this study population, with the exception of Denmark for the survey year 2009/2010.

    Conclusion

    Different trends resulted in increased country differences in food habits during the time of observations. In survey year 2009/2010, Danish students reported a higher intake of fruit and vegetable consumption than their counterparts in the other Nordic countries. Finnish students reported the lowest frequency of sweets and soft drink consumption. Despite the positive dietary trends documented in the present study, the majority of Nordic adolescents are far from meeting national dietary recommendations. Our findings underline the need for more comprehensive initiatives targeting young people's food habits as well as a more deliberate and focused action to close gaps in social inequalities that affect food choices.

  • 8.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Latorre-Margalef, Neus
    Section for Zoonotic Ecology and Epidemiology, School of Natural Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Hobson, Keith
    ldlife and Landscape Science, Environment Canada, Saskatoon.
    Steven, Van Wilgenburg
    ldlife and Landscape Science, Environment Canada, Saskatoon.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Olsen, Björn
    Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala.
    Fouchier, Ron
    Department of Virology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Section for Zoonotic Ecology and Epidemiology, School of Natural Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Disease dynamics and bird migration: linking mallards Anas platyrhynchos and subtype diversity of the influenza A virus in time and space2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 4, p. e35679-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mallard Anas platyrhynchos is a reservoir species for influenza A virus in the northern hemisphere, with particularly high prevalence rates prior to as well as during its prolonged autumn migration. It has been proposed that the virus is brought from the breeding grounds and transmitted to conspecifics during subsequent staging during migration, and so a better understanding of the natal origin of staging ducks is vital to deciphering the dynamics of viral movement pathways. Ottenby is an important stopover site in southeast Sweden almost halfway downstream in the major Northwest European flyway, and is used by millions of waterfowl each year. Here, mallards were captured and sampled for influenza A virus infection, and positive samples were subtyped in order to study possible links to the natal area, which were determined by a novel approach combining banding recovery data and isotopic measurements (δ2H) of feathers grown on breeding grounds. Geographic assignments showed that the core natal areas of studied mallards were in Estonia, southern and central Finland, and northwestern Russia. This study demonstrates a clear temporal succession of latitudes of natal origin during the course of autumn migration. We also demonstrate a corresponding and concomitant shift in virus subtypes. Acknowledging that these two different patterns were based in part upon different data, a likely interpretation worth further testing is that the early arriving birds with more proximate origins have different influenza A subtypes than the more distantly originating late autumn birds. If true, this knowledge would allow novel insight into the origins and transmission of the influenza A virus among migratory hosts previously unavailable through conventional approaches.

  • 9.
    Hellström, Amanda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University.
    Luik, Annemarie I
    University of Oxford.
    Espie, Colin A
    University of Oxford.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University.
    A classical test theory evaluation of the sleep condition indicator accounting for the ordinal nature of item response data2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Insomnia symptoms are common among young adults and affect about 5% to 26% of 19 to 34-year-olds. In addition, insomnia is associated with poor mental health and may affect daily performance. In research, as well as in clinical practice, sleep questionnaires are used to screen for and diagnose insomnia. However, most questionnaires are not developed according to current DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. An exception is the recently developed Sleep Condition Indicator (SCI), an eight-item scale screening for insomnia.

    AIM: The aim of this study was to perform a Classical Test Theory (CTT) based psychometric evaluation of the SCI in a sample of Swedish university students, by taking the ordinal nature of item level data into account.

    METHODS: The SCI was translated into Swedish and distributed online to undergraduate students at three Swedish universities, within programs of health, psychology, science or economy. Of 3673 invited students, 634 (mean age 26.9 years; SD = 7.4) completed the questionnaire that, in addition to the SCI, comprised other scales on sleep, stress, lifestyle and students' study environment. Data were analyzed according to CTT investigating data completeness, item homogeneity and unidimensionality.

    RESULTS: Polychoric based explorative factor analysis suggested unidimensionality of the SCI, and internal consistency was good (Cronbach's alpha, 0.91; ordinal alpha, 0.94). SCI scores correlated with the Insomnia Severity Index (-0.88) as well as with sleep quality (-0.85) and perceived stress (-0.50), supporting external construct validity.

    CONCLUSIONS: These observations support the integrity of the of the SCI. The SCI demonstrates sound CTT-based psychometric properties, supporting its use as an insomnia screening tool.

  • 10.
    Henmyr, Viktor
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Halldén, Christer
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Säll, Torbjörn
    Lund University.
    Carlberg, Daniel
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Bachert, Claus
    Belgien.
    Cardell, Lars-Olaf
    Karolinska institutet.
    Chronic rhinosinusitis patients show accumulation of genetic variants in PARS22016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, article id e0158202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic studies of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) have identified a total of 53 CRS-associated SNPs that were subsequently evaluated for their reproducibility in a recent study. The rs2873551 SNP in linkage disequilibrium with PARS2 showed the strongest association signal. The present study aims to comprehensively screen for rare variants in PARS2 and evaluate for accumulation of such variants in CRS-patients. Sanger sequencing and long-range PCR were used to screen for rare variants in the putative promoter region and coding sequence of 310 CRS-patients and a total of 21 variants were detected. The mutation spectrum was then compared with data from European populations of the 1000Genomes project (EUR) and the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC). The CRS population showed a significant surplus of low-frequency variants compared with ExAC data. Haplotype analysis of the region showed a significant excess of rare haplotypes in the CRS population compared to the EUR population. Two missense mutations were also genotyped in the 310 CRS patients and 372 CRS-negative controls, but no associations with the disease were found. This is the first re-sequencing study in CRS research and also the first study to show an association of rare variants with the disease.

  • 11.
    Järhult, Josef D.
    et al.
    Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Muradrasoli, Shaman
    Section of Bacteriology and Food Safety, Department of.
    Wahlgren, John
    Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and Karolinska Institute.
    Söderström, Hanna
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Orozovic, Goran
    Section for Zoonotic Ecology and Epidemiology, School of Natural Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Bröjer, Caroline
    National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala.
    Latorre-Margalef, Neus
    Section for Zoonotic Ecology and Epidemiology, School of Natural Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Fick, Jerker
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Grabic, Roman
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Lennerstrand, Johan
    Section of Clinical Virology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Section for Zoonotic Ecology and Epidemiology, School of Natural Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Lundkvist, Åke
    Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and Karolinska Institute.
    Olsen, Björn
    Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Environmental levels of the antiviral oseltamivir induce development of resistance mutation H274Y in influenza A/H1N1 Virus in mallards2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 9, p. e24742-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oseltamivir (Tamiflu) is the most widely used drug against influenza infections and is extensively stockpiled worldwide as part of pandemic preparedness plans. However, resistance is a growing problem and in 2008–2009, seasonal human influenza A/H1N1 virus strains in most parts of the world carried the mutation H274Y in the neuraminidase gene which causes resistance to the drug. The active metabolite of oseltamivir, oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), is poorly degraded in sewage treatment plants and surface water and has been detected in aquatic environments where the natural influenza reservoir, dabbling ducks, can be exposed to the substance. To assess if resistance can develop under these circumstances, we infected mallards with influenza A/H1N1 virus and exposed the birds to 80 ng/L, 1 mg/L and 80m g/L of OC through their sole water source. By sequencing the neuraminidase gene from fecal samples, we found that H274Y occurred at 1 mg/L of OC and rapidly dominated the viral population at 80 mg/L. IC50 for OC was increased from 2–4 nM in wild-type viruses to 400–700 nM in H274Y mutants as measured by a neuraminidase inhibition assay. This is consistent with the decrease in sensitivity to OC that has been noted among human clinical isolates carrying H274Y. Environmental OC levels have been measured to 58–293 ng/L during seasonal outbreaks and are expected to reach mg/L-levels during pandemics. Thus, resistance could be induced in influenza viruses circulating among wild ducks. As influenza viruses can cross species barriers, oseltamivir resistance could spread to human-adapted strains with pandemic potential disabling oseltamivir, a cornerstone in pandemic preparedness planning. We propose surveillance in wild birds as a measure to understand the resistance situation in nature and to monitor it over time. Strategies to lower environmental levels of OC include improved sewage treatment and, more importantly, a prudent use of antivirals.

  • 12.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Hygum, Thomas L
    Danmark.
    Andersen, Kasper N
    Danmark.
    Clausen, Lykke K. B.
    Danmark.
    Møbjerg, Nadja
    Danmark.
    Tolerance to gamma radiation in the marine heterotardigrade, Echiniscoides sigismundi2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, article id e0168884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tardigrades belong to the most radiation tolerant animals on Earth, as documented by a number of studies using both low-LET and high-LET ionizing radiation. Previous studies have focused on semi-terrestrial species, which are also very tolerant to desiccation. The predominant view on the reason for the high radiation tolerance among these semi-terrestrial species is that it relies on molecular mechanisms that evolved as adaptations for surviving dehydration. In this study we report the first study on radiation tolerance in a marine tardigrade, Echiniscoides sigismundi. Adult specimens in the hydrated active state were exposed to doses of gamma radiation from 100 to 5000 Gy. The results showed little effect of radiation at 100 and 500 Gy but a clear decline in activity at 1000 Gy and higher. The highest dose survived was 4000 Gy, at which ca. 8% of the tardigrades were active 7 days after irradiation. LD50 in the first 7 days after irradiation was in the range of 1100±1600 Gy. Compared to previous studies on radiation tolerance in semi-terrestrial and limnic tardigrades, Echiniscoides sigismundi seems to have a lower tolerance. However, the species still fits into the category of tardigrades that have high tolerance to both desiccation and radiation, supporting the hypothesis that radiation tolerance is a by-product of adaptive mechanisms to survive desiccation. More studies on radiation tolerance in tardigrade species adapted to permanently wet conditions, both marine and freshwater, are needed to obtain a more comprehensive picture of the patterns of radiation tolerance.

  • 13.
    Jørgensen, Øyvind
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Psykologi.
    Bäckström, Martin
    Lund University.
    Björklund, Fredrik
    Lund University.
    Judgments of warmth and competence in a computerized paradigm: little evidence of proposed impression formation asymmetries2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e0175210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much of what we know concerning impression formation is based on experimental methods where the participant receives a list of traits or behaviors and is asked to make trait judgments or meta-cognitive judgments. The present study aimed to put some well-known effects from the impression formation literature to a test in a more dynamic computerized environment, more akin to many real world impression formation scenarios. In three studies participants were introduced to multiple target persons. They were given information about the target persons' behavior, one at a time, while making ratings of their warmth and competence, and their probability of performing related behaviors in the future. In neither of the studies the negativity effect of warmth or the positivity effect of competence were reproduced.

  • 14.
    Lindahl, Pernilla
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Säll, Torbjörn
    Department of Biology, Lund University.
    Bjartell, Anders
    Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Johansson, Anna M
    Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Lilja, Hans
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Halldén, Christer
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Copy number variants in the kallikrein gene cluster2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 7, p. e69097-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The kallikrein gene family (KLK1-KLK15) is the largest contiguous group of protease genes within the human genome and is associated with both risk and outcome of cancer and other diseases. We searched for copy number variants in all KLK genes using quantitative PCR analysis and analysis of inheritance patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Two deletions were identified: one 2235-bp deletion in KLK9 present in 1.2% of alleles, and one 3394-bp deletion in KLK15 present in 4.0% of alleles. Each deletion eliminated one complete exon and created out-of-frame coding that eliminated the catalytic triad of the resulting truncated gene product, which therefore likely is a non-functional protein. Deletion breakpoints identified by DNA sequencing located the KLK9 deletion breakpoint to a long interspersed element (LINE) repeated sequence, while the deletion in KLK15 is located in a single copy sequence. To search for an association between each deletion and risk of prostate cancer (PC), we analyzed a cohort of 667 biopsied men (266 PC cases and 401 men with no evidence of PC at biopsy) using short deletion-specific PCR assays. There was no association between evidence of PC in this cohort and the presence of either gene deletion. Haplotyping revealed a single origin of each deletion, with most recent common ancestor estimates of 3000-8000 and 6000-14 000 years for the deletions in KLK9 and KLK15, respectively. The presence of the deletions on the same haplotypes in 1000 Genomes data of both European and African populations indicate an early origin of both deletions. The old age in combination with homozygous presence of loss-of-function variants suggests that some kallikrein-related peptidases have non-essential functions.

  • 15.
    Løvereide, Lise
    et al.
    Norge.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Measuring life satisfaction in Parkinson's disease and healthy controls using the satisfaction with life scale2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 10, article id e0163931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 5-item Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) was designed to measure general life satisfaction (LS). Here we examined the psychometric properties of the SWLS in a cohort of persons with Parkinson`s disease (PwPD) and age and gender matched individuals without PD. The SWLS was administered to PwPD and controls from the Norwegian ParkWest study at 5 and 7 years after the time of diagnosis. Data were analysed according to classical test theory (CTT) and Rasch measurement theory. CTT scaling assumptions for computation of a SWLS total score were met (corrected item-total correlations >0.58). The SWLS was reasonably well targeted to the sample and had good reliability (ordinal alpha, 0.92). The scale exhibited good fit to the Rasch model and successfully separated between 5 statistically distinct strata of people (levels of SWLS). The seven response categories did not work as intended and the scale may benefit from reduction to five response categories. There was no clinically significant differential item functioning. Separate analyses in PwPD and controls yielded very similar results to those from the pooled analysis. This study supports the SWLS as a valid instrument for measuring LS in PD and controls. However, Rasch analyses provided new insights into the performance and validity of the SWLS and identified areas for future revisions in order to further improve the scale.

  • 16.
    Madsen, Elainie Alenkær
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Persson, Tomas
    Lund University.
    Sayehli, Susan
    Lund University.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Lund University.
    Sonesson, Göran
    Lund University.
    Chimpanzees show a developmental increase in susceptibility to contagious yawning: a test of the effect of ontogeny and emotional closeness on yawn contagion2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contagious yawning has been reported for humans, dogs and several non-human primate species, and associated with empathy in humans and other primates. Still, the function, development and underlying mechanisms of contagious yawning remain unclear. Humans and dogs show a developmental increase in susceptibility to yawn contagion, with children showing an increase around the age of four, when also empathy-related behaviours and accurate identification of others' emotions begin to clearly evince. Explicit tests of yawn contagion in non-human apes have only involved adult individuals and examined the existence of conspecific yawn contagion. Here we report the first study of heterospecific contagious yawning in primates, and the ontogeny of susceptibility thereto in chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes verus. We examined whether emotional closeness, defined as attachment history with the yawning model, affected the strength of contagion, and compared the contagiousness of yawning to nose-wiping. Thirty-three orphaned chimpanzees observed an unfamiliar and familiar human (their surrogate human mother) yawn, gape and nose-wipe. Yawning, but not nose-wiping, was contagious for juvenile chimpanzees, while infants were immune to contagion. Like humans and dogs, chimpanzees are subject to a developmental trend in susceptibility to contagious yawning, and respond to heterospecific yawn stimuli. Emotional closeness with the model did not affect contagion. The familiarity-biased social modulatory effect on yawn contagion previously found among some adult primates, seem to only emerge later in development, or be limited to interactions with conspecifics. The influence of the 'chameleon effect', targeted vs. generalised empathy, perspective-taking and visual attention on contagious yawning is discussed.

  • 17.
    Manderstedt, Eric
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Plattformen för molekylär analys. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Lethagen, Stefan
    Danmark & Lund University.
    Halldén, Christer
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Genetic variation in the C-type lectin receptor CLEC4M in type 1 von Willebrand Disease patients2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels in healthy individuals and in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease (VWD) are influenced by genetic variation in several genes, e.g. VWF, ABO, STXBP5 and CLEC4M. This study aims to screen comprehensively for CLEC4M variants and investigate their association with type 1 VWD in the Swedish population. In order to screen for CLEC4M variants, the CLEC4M gene region was re-sequenced and the polymorphic neck region was genotyped in 106 type 1 VWD patients from unrelated type 1 VWD families. Single nucleotide variants (SNV) and variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) allele and genotype frequencies were then compared with 294 individuals from the 1000Genomes project and 436 Swedish control individuals. Re-sequencing identified a total of 42 SNVs. Rare variants showed no accumulation in type 1 VWD patients and are not thought to contribute substantially to type 1 VWD. The only missense mutation (rs2277998, NP_001138379.1:p.Asp224Asn) had a higher frequency in type 1 VWD patients than in controls (4.9%). The VNTR genotypes 57 and 67 were observed at higher frequencies than expected in type 1 VWD patients (6.4% and 6.2%) and showed an increase in patients compared with controls (7.4% and 3.1%). Strong linkage disequilibrium in the CLEC4M region makes it difficult to distinguish between the effect of the missense mutation and the VNTR genotypes. In conclusion, heterozygous VNTR genotypes 57 and 67 of CLEC4M were highly enriched and are the most likely mechanism through which CLEC4M contributes to disease in the Swedish type 1 VWD population.

  • 18.
    Manderstedt, Eric
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Nilsson, Rosanna
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap. rosanna.nilsson@hkr.se .
    Lind-Halldén, Christina
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Ljung, Rolf
    Skåne University Hospital.
    Astermark, Jan
    Skåne University Hospital.
    Halldén, Christer
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Targeted re-sequencing of F8, F9 and VWF: characterization of Ion Torrent data and clinical implications for mutation screening.2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations are not identified in ~5% of hemophilia A and 10-35% of type 1 VWD patients. The bleeding tendency also varies among patients carrying the same causative mutation, potentially indicating variants in additional genes modifying the phenotype that cannot be identified by routine single-gene analysis. The F8, F9 and VWF genes were analyzed in parallel using an AmpliSeq strategy and Ion Torrent sequencing. Targeting all exonic positions showed an average read depth of >2000X and coverage close to 100% in 24 male patients with known disease-causing mutations. Discrimination between reference alleles and alternative/indel alleles was adequate at a 25% frequency threshold. In F8, F9 and VWF there was an absolute majority of all reference alleles at allele frequencies >95% and the average alternative allele and indel frequencies never reached above 10% and 15%, respectively. In VWF, 4-5 regions showed lower reference allele frequencies; in two regions covered by the pseudogene close to the 25% cut-off for reference alleles. All known mutations, including indels, gross deletions and substitutions, were identified. Additional VWF variants were identified in three hemophilia patients. The presence of additional mutations in 2 out of 16 (12%) randomly selected hemophilia patients indicates a potential mutational contribution that may affect the disease phenotype and counseling in these patients. Parallel identification of disease-causing mutations in all three genes not only confirms the deficiency, but differentiates phenotypic overlaps and allows for correct genetic counseling.

  • 19.
    Nasir, Irem
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Fatih, Warda
    Upper 2nd school, Klippan, Sweden.
    Svensson, Anja
    Upper 2nd school, Klippan, Sweden.
    Radu, Dennis
    Upper 2nd school, Klippan, Sweden.
    Linse, Sara
    Lund University.
    Cabaleiro-Lago, Celia
    Lund University.
    Lundqvist, Martin
    Lund University.
    High throughput screening method to explore protein interactions with nanoparticles2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interactions of biological macromolecules with nanoparticles underlie a wide variety of current and future applications in the fields of biotechnology, medicine and bioremediation. The same interactions are also responsible for mediating potential biohazards of nanomaterials. Some applications require that proteins adsorb to the nanomaterial and that the protein resists or undergoes structural rearrangements. This article presents a screening method for detecting nanoparticle-protein partners and conformational changes on time scales ranging from milliseconds to days. Mobile fluorophores are used as reporters to study the interaction between proteins and nanoparticles in a high-throughput manner in multi-well format. Furthermore, the screening method may reveal changes in colloidal stability of nanomaterials depending on the physicochemical conditions.

  • 20.
    Nilsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Andiappan, Anand Kumar
    Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore.
    Halldén, Christer
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Tim, Chew Fook
    Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore.
    Säll, Torbjörn
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University.
    Wang, De Yun
    Department of Otolaryngology, National University of Singapore.
    Cardell, Lars-Olaf
    Division of ENT Diseases, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet.
    Poor reproducibility of allergic rhinitis SNP associations2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 1, p. e53975-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Replication of reported associations is crucial to the investigation of complex disease. More than 100 SNPs have previously been reported as associated with allergic rhinitis (AR), but few of these have been replicated successfully. To investigate the general reproducibility of reported AR-associations in candidate gene studies, one Swedish (352 AR-cases, 709 controls) and one Singapore Chinese population (948 AR-cases, 580 controls) were analyzed using 49 AR-associated SNPs. The overall pattern of P-values indicated that very few of the investigated SNPs were associated with AR. Given published odds ratios (ORs) most SNPs showed high power to detect an association, but no correlations were found between the ORs of the two study populations or with published ORs. None of the association signals were in common to the two genome-wide association studies published in AR, indicating that the associations represent false positives or have much lower effect-sizes than reported.

  • 21.
    Ousdal, Olga T.
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital.
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    Oslo University Hospital.
    Server, Andres
    Oslo University Hospital.
    Jensen, Jimmy
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Increased amygdala and visual cortex activity and functional connectivity towards stimulus novelty is associated with state anxiety2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 4, p. e96146-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel stimuli often require a rapid reallocation of sensory processing resources to determine the significance of the event, and the appropriate behavioral response. Both the amygdala and the visual cortex are central elements of the neural circuitry responding to novelty, demonstrating increased activity to new as compared to highly familiarized stimuli. Further, these brain areas are intimately connected, and thus the amygdala may be a key region for directing sensory processing resources to novel events. Although knowledge regarding the neurocircuit of novelty detection is gradually increasing, we still lack a basic understanding of the conditions that are necessary and sufficient for novelty-specific responses in human amygdala and the visual cortices, and if these brain areas interact during detection of novelty. In the present study, we investigated the response of amygdala and the visual cortex to novelty, by comparing functional MRI activity between 1st and 2nd time presentation of a series of emotional faces in an event-related task. We observed a significant decrease in amygdala and visual cortex activity already after a single stimulus exposure. Interestingly, this decrease in responsiveness was less for subjects with a high score on state anxiety. Further, novel faces stimuli were associated with a relative increase in the functional coupling between the amygdala and the inferior occipital gyrus (BA 18). Thus, we suggest that amygdala is involved in fast sensory boosting that may be important for attention reallocation to novel events, and that the strength of this response depends on individual state anxiety.

  • 22.
    Psouni, Elia
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Biomedicin.
    Janke, Axel
    LOEWE – Biodiversity and Climate Research Center – BiK-F, Senckenberganlage, Frankfurt am Main.
    Garwicz, Martin
    Neuronano Research Center, BMC F10, Lund University.
    Impact of carnivory on human development and evolution revealed by a new unifying model of weaning in mammals2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 4, p. e32452-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our large brain, long life span and high fertility are key elements of human evolutionary success and are often thought to have evolved in interplay with tool use, carnivory and hunting. However, the specific impact of carnivory on human evolution, life history and development remains controversial. Here we show in quantitative terms that dietary profile is a key factor influencing time to weaning across a wide taxonomic range of mammals, including humans. In a model encompassing a total of 67 species and genera from 12 mammalian orders, adult brain mass and two dichotomous variables reflecting species differences regarding limb biomechanics and dietary profile, accounted for 75.5%, 10.3% and 3.4% of variance in time to weaning, respectively, together capturing 89.2% of total variance. Crucially, carnivory predicted the time point of early weaning in humans with remarkable precision, yielding a prediction error of less than 5% with a sample of forty-six human natural fertility societies as reference. Hence, carnivory appears to provide both a necessary and sufficient explanation as to why humans wean so much earlier than the great apes. While early weaning is regarded as essentially differentiating the genus <italic>Homo</italic> from the great apes, its timing seems to be determined by the same limited set of factors in humans as in mammals in general, despite some 90 million years of evolution. Our analysis emphasizes the high degree of similarity of relative time scales in mammalian development and life history across 67 genera from 12 mammalian orders and shows that the impact of carnivory on time to weaning in humans is quantifiable, and critical. Since early weaning yields shorter interbirth intervals and higher rates of reproduction, with profound effects on population dynamics, our findings highlight the emergence of carnivory as a process fundamentally determining human evolution.

  • 23.
    Söderquist, Pär
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Norrström, Joanna
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Wild mallards have more ‘‘goose-like’’ bills than their ancestors: a case of anthropogenic influence?2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 12, article id e115143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wild populations of the world’s most common dabbling duck, the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), run the risk of genetic introgression by farmed conspecifics released for hunting purposes. We tested whether bill morphology of free-living birds has changed since large-scale releases of farmed mallards started. Three groups of mallards from Sweden, Norway and Finland were compared: historical wild (before large-scale releases started), present-day wild, and present-day farmed. Higher density of bill lamellae was observed in historical wild mallards (only males). Farmed mallards had wider bills than present-day and historical wild ones. Present-day wild and farmed mallards also had higher and shorter bills than historical wild mallards. Present-day mallards thus tend to have more “goose-like” bills (wider, higher, and shorter) than their ancestors. Our study suggests that surviving released mallards affect morphological traits in wild population by introgression. We discuss how such anthropogenic impact may lead to a maladapted and genetically compromised wild mallard population. Our study system has bearing on other taxa where large-scale releases of conspecifics with ‘alien genes’ may cause a cryptic invasive process that nevertheless has fitness consequences for individual birds.

  • 24.
    Thelin, Jonas
    et al.
    Neuronano Research Centre, Lund University.
    Jörntell, Henrik
    Neuronano Research Centre, Lund University.
    Psouni, Elia
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Garwicz, Martin
    Neuronano Research Centre, Lund University.
    Schouenborg, Jens
    Neuronano Research Centre, Lund University.
    Danielsen, Nils
    Neuronano Research Centre, Lund University.
    Eriksson Linsmeier, Cecilia
    Neuronano Research Centre, Lund University.
    Implant size and fixation mode strongly influence tissue reactions in the CNS2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 1, p. e16267-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The function of chronic brain machine interfaces depends on stable electrical contact between neurons and electrodes. A key step in the development of interfaces is therefore to identify implant configurations that minimize adverse long-term tissue reactions. To this end, we here characterized the separate and combined effects of implant size and fixation mode at 6 and 12 weeks post implantation in rat (n = 24) cerebral cortex. Neurons and activated microglia and astrocytes were visualized using NeuN, ED1 and GFAP immunofluorescence microscopy, respectively. The contributions of individual experimental variables to the tissue response were quantified. Implants tethered to the skull caused larger tissue reactions than un-tethered implants. Small diameter (50 mu m) implants elicited smaller tissue reactions and resulted in the survival of larger numbers of neurons than did large diameter (200 mu m) implants. In addition, tethering resulted in an oval-shaped cavity, with a cross-section area larger than that of the implant itself, and in marked changes in morphology and organization of neurons in the region closest to the tissue interface. Most importantly, for implants that were both large diameter and tethered, glia activation was still ongoing 12 weeks after implantation, as indicated by an increase in GFAP staining between week 6 and 12, while this pattern was not observed for un-tethered, small diameter implants. Our findings therefore clearly indicate that the combined small diameter, un-tethered implants cause the smallest tissue reactions.

  • 25.
    Tolf, Conny
    et al.
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial Model Systems (EEMiS), Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Latorre-Margalef, Neus
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial Model Systems (EEMiS), Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Wille, Michelle
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial Model Systems (EEMiS), Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Bengtsson, Daniel
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial Model Systems (EEMiS), Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Grosbois, Vladimir
    Centre de coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), Montpellier.
    Hasselquist, Dennis
    Department of Biology, Lund University.
    Olsen, Björn
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial Model Systems (EEMiS), Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Individual variation in influenza A virus infection histories and long-term immune responses in mallards2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4, p. e61201-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wild dabbling ducks (genus Anas) are the main reservoir for influenza A virus (IAV) in the Northern Hemisphere. Current understanding of disease dynamics and epidemiology in this virus-host system has primarily been based on populationlevel ,surveillance studies and infection experiments conducted in laboratory settings. Using a combined experimentalnatural approach with wild-strain captive mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), we monitored individual IAV infection histories and immunological responses of 10 birds over the course of 15 months. This is the first detailed study to track natural IAV infection histories over several seasons amongst the same individuals growing from juvenile to adults. The general trends in the infection histories of the monitored birds reflected seasonal variation in prevalence at the population level. However, within the study group there were significant differences between individuals in infection frequency as well as in short and long term anti-IAV antibody response. Further observations included individual variation in the number of infecting virus subtypes, and a strong tendency for long-lasting hemagglutinin-related homosubtypic immunity. Specifically, all infections in the second autumn, except one, were of different subtypes compared to the first autumn. The variation among birds concerning these epidemiologically important traits illustrates the necessity for IAV studies to move from the level of populations to examine individuals in order to further our understanding of IAV disease and epidemiology.

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