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  • 1.
    Arzel, Céline
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Frankrike.
    Legagneux, Pierre
    Frankrike.
    Bosca, Fabrice
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Chambouleyron, Mathieu
    Frankrike.
    Lepley, Michel
    Frankrike.
    Pin, Christophe
    Frankrike.
    Arnaud, Antoine
    Frankrike.
    Schricke, Vincent
    Frankrike.
    Average mass of seeds encountered by foraging dabbling ducks in western Europe2007In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 328-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many dabbling ducks Anas spp. are largely granivorous, consuming a variety of seeds chiefly from aquatic plants. To assess the relative value and carrying capacity of wetlands for dabbling ducks, species-specific information about seed mass is needed, but it is still largely missing or scattered in the literature. By combining weights of seeds collected in the field with a literature review, we provide a reference table for seed mass of 200 western European plant taxa frequently encountered by foraging dabbling ducks. Seeds collected in the field were sampled in microhabitats and at depths at which ducks were observed to forage, and study sites represent wintering, staging as well as breeding areas within a flyway in western Europe. When combined with calorimetric data, the present reference table will aid managers and scientists in assessing the importance of seed food resources at different sites and during different parts of the annual cycle.

  • 2.
    Caizergues, Alain
    et al.
    Frankrike.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Frankrike.
    Arzel, Céline
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Devineau, Olivier
    USA.
    Leray, Gilles
    Frankrike.
    Pilvin, Daniel
    Frankrike.
    Lepley, Michel
    Frankrike.
    Massez, Grégoire
    Frankrike.
    Schricke, Vincent
    Frankrike.
    Emigration rates and population turnover of teal Anas crecca in two major wetlands of western Europe2011In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 373-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the winter of 2003/04, we studied emigration rates of teal Anas crecca in two major wetlands: the Camargue (southern France) and the Loire estuary (western France). We derived local survival probabilities as a step in ultimately estimating emigration rates from individual mark-resighting (visual recaptures) history of birds fitted with nasal saddles. In goodness-of-fit tests of time-dependent models for local survival, we only detected the presence of transients among young females in the Loire estuary, which indicated that this category of individuals includes an ‘unstable compartment’ continuing its migratory journey further to the south. We observed low monthly local survival and high emigration rates (range: 0.01-0.81) in both areas, which suggests high turnover rates. In the Loire estuary, temporal changes in emigration rates matched the post- and pre-nuptial migration peaks (i.e. October-November and February-March). By combining local survival probabilities and count data, we derived an estimate of the ratio between the winter peak count of teals in our study areas and the minimum number of birds that actually frequented the areas over the entire wintering period (October-March). In both cases, we estimated the number of teal visiting the two wintering sites be about twice as large as the maximum number of birds counted instantaneously.

  • 3.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Density-dependent breeding success in mallards Anas platyrhynchos on a eutrophic lake2003In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 67-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Census data from a eutrophic lake collected in 1987-1999 were used to study nesting and breeding success in mallards Anas platyrhynchos. In each year there were 6-19 pair counts and 13-34 brood counts. The maximum combined count of single males and pairs (i.e. on any day in any of three census periods in May) provided the best fit with subsequent estimates of breeding success. Nesting success (average brood:pair ratio = 0.52), brood size of older ducklings (mean = 5.7) as well as fledgling success (2.86 juveniles per nesting pair) were higher than in many previous mallard studies. Per capita brood production as well as per capita fledgling production was negatively density dependent, but the latter was not statistically independent of the former. There was no correlation between per capita fledgling success and duckling mortality on a year-by-year basis, hence the density-dependent pattern in breeding success appears to be mediated through variation in nesting success. The number of paired females at the start of the breeding season correlated positively with the production of fledged juveniles the year before.

  • 4.
    Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Nummi, Petri
    Finland.
    Pöysä, Hannu
    Finland.
    Sjöberg, Kjell
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Clausen, Preben
    Danmark.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Frankrike.
    Rodrigues, David
    Portugal.
    Väänänen, Veli-Matti
    Finland.
    The scientific basis for a new and sustainable management of migratory European ducks2006In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 121-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is an axiom in ecology that knowing the sheer number of individuals in a population is of very little help if the objective is to understand future and past changes in population size. Yet, this is exactly how migratory European ducks are monitored, many of which are important quarry species in several countries. We argue that present monitoring is insufficient to address objectives of wise use and sustainability such as those emphasised in recent management directives and multilateral international agreements. The two main problems are the almost total lack of reliable data on recruitment and mortality. We advocate a pan-European monitoring system based on undisputed scientific principles; i.e. a long-term, coordinated and standardised scheme that produces data about vital rates of duck populations as well as about harvest size. Data from such a scheme can be used by game biologists to produce predictive tools, thus providing a functional basis for management decisions for adaptive harvesting and conservation alike.

  • 5.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    et al.
    Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage, CNERA Avifaune Migratrice, La Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, Arles.
    Pöysä, Hannu
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Joensuu Game and Fisheries Research.
    Fox, Anthony D.
    Thomas Eske Holm & Thomas Kjær Christensen, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Arzel, Céline
    Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku.
    Dessborn, Lisa
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Ekroos, Johan
    Centre for Environmental and Climate Research, Lund.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Eske Holm, Thomas
    Thomas Eske Holm & Thomas Kjær Christensen, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Kjær Christensen, Thomas
    Thomas Eske Holm & Thomas Kjær Christensen, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Lehikoinen, Aleksi
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki.
    Mitchell, Carl
    Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, Slimbridge.
    Rintala, Jukka
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Helsinki.
    Pape Møller, Anders
    Laboratoire Ecologie Systématique et Evolution (UMR 8079), Université Paris-Sud XI, Orsay.
    Effects of climate change on European ducks: what do we know and what do we need to know?2013In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 404-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The consequences of climate change for bird populations have received much attention in recent decades, especially amongst cavity-nesting songbirds, yet little has been written on ducks (Anatidae) despite these being major elements of wetland diversity and important quarry species. This paper reviews the major known consequences of climate change for birds in general, and relates these to the limited information available specifically for ducks. Climate change can influence migration distance and phenology, potentially affecting patterns of mortality, as well as distribution and reproductive success in ducks. Studies addressing effects of climate change are, however, restricted to very few duck species, including mallardAnas platyrhynchos and common eider Somateria mollissima. Shifts in winter duck distributions have been observed, whereas the mismatch hypothesis (mistiming between the periods of peak energy requirements for young and the peak of seasonal food availability) has received limited support with regard to ducks. We propose a range of monitoring initiatives, including population surveys, breeding success monitoring schemes and individual duck marking, which should later be integrated through population modelling and adaptive management to fill these gaps.

  • 6.
    Holopainen, Sari
    et al.
    Finland.
    Arzel, Céline
    Finland.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Fox, Anthony D
    Danmark.
    Guillemain, Matthieu
    Frankrike.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Nummi, Petri
    Finland.
    Sjöberg, Kjell
    Swedish Univ of Agricultural Sciences.
    Väänänen, Veli-Matti
    Finland.
    Alhainen, M
    Finland.
    Pöysä, Hannu
    Finland.
    Sustainable management of migratory European ducks: finding model species2018In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eurasian migratory duck species represent a natural resource shared between European countries. As is evident throughout human harvest history, lack of coordinated management and monitoring at appropriate levels often leads to ‘the tragedy of the commons’, where shared populations suffer overexploitation. Effective management can also be hampered by poor understanding of the factors that limit and regulate migratory populations throughout their flyways, and over time. Following decades of population increase, some European duck populations now show signs of levelling off or even decline, underlining the need for more active and effective management. In Europe, the existing mechanisms for delivering effective management of duck populations are limited, despite the need and enthusiasm for establishing adaptive management (AM) schemes for wildlife populations. Existing international legal agreements already oblige European countries to sustainably manage migratory waterbirds. Although the lack of coordinated demographic and hunting data remains a challenge to sustainable management planning, AM provides a robust decision-making framework even in the presence of uncertainty regarding demographic and other information. In this paper we investigate the research and monitoring needs in Europe to successfully apply AM to ducks, and search for possible model species, focusing on freshwater species (in contrast to sea duck species) in the East Atlantic flyway. Based on current knowledge, we suggest that common teal Anas crecca, Eurasian wigeon Mareca penelope and common goldeneye Bucephala clangula represent the best species for testing the application of an AM modelling approach to duck populations in Europe. Applying AM to huntable species with relatively good population data as models for broader implementation represents a cost effect to develop AM on a European flyway scale for ducks, and potentially other waterbirds in the future.

1 - 6 of 6
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  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • Other locale
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