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  • 1.
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    A study of recurring core developmental features in students’ conceptions of some key ecological processes2004In: Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, ISSN 1492-6156, E-ISSN 1942-4051, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 59-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this 6-year longitudinal study, 24 students were interviewed 11 times, between the ages of 9 and 15, to learn about their understanding of ecological processes. Students were asked about their conceptions of three topics: (a) the conditions for life of plants in a sealed transparent container, (b) the decomposition of leaves on the ground, and (c) the role of flowers in plant reproduction. At ages 15 and 19, the students listened to what they had said about these topics as 11? and 15?year?olds. They were then asked to state how they thought their understanding had developed. The interviews were analysed using principles from Ausubel's (1978) theory of meaningful learning. Characteristic individual themes in the students? conceptions could be followed year by year, especially with respect to their understanding of the cycles in nature. After the students had listened to their earlier interviews, they would often refer to experiences from an early age that they mentioned again and again. The analysis of students? descriptions of themselves as learners also made it possible to discern their different views of learning about ecological processes. In this 6?year longitudinal study, 24 students were interviewed 11 times, between the ages of 9 and 15, to learn about their understanding of ecological processes. Students were asked about their conceptions of three topics: (a) the conditions for life of plants in a sealed transparent container, (b) the decomposition of leaves on the ground, and (c) the role of flowers in plant reproduction. At ages 15 and 19, the students listened to what they had said about these topics as 11? and 15?year?olds. They were then asked to state how they thought their understanding had developed. The interviews were analysed using principles from Ausubel's (1978) theory of meaningful learning. Characteristic individual themes in the students? conceptions could be followed year by year, especially with respect to their understanding of the cycles in nature. After the students had listened to their earlier interviews, they would often refer to experiences from an early age that they mentioned again and again. The analysis of students? descriptions of themselves as learners also made it possible to discern their different views of learning about ecological processes.

  • 2.
    Holgersson, Ingemar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Löfgren, Lena
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    A long-term study of students' explanations of transformations of matter2004In: Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, ISSN 1492-6156, E-ISSN 1942-4051, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 77-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a long-term study of young children's understanding of matter and its transformations. Interviews concerning children's conceptions could be seen in the idioms, personal framings of experiences, that became apparent as a result of the longitudinal design of the study. As part of the project, we also made an early (at the age of 6) introduction ot the concept, molecule. Depending on the phenomenon presented to them for explanation, some of the children used the molecule concept as a tool for understanding and explaining, while others did not. By focusing on a few examples, which we analyse in detail, we argue that long-term studies give rich detail and important information about children's learning that other kinds of study do not.

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