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  • 1.
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, and the Vårdal Institute, Lund University.
    Bird, Mike
    NSW Greater Southern Area Health Service and National Australian University , Canberra, Australia.
    Richards, David A.
    Department of Health Sciences , University of York , United Kingdom.
    Woods, Robert
    School of Psychology, University of Wales Bangor , United Kingdom.
    Keeley, Philip
    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, The University of Manchester , United Kingdom.
    Davis-Quarrell, Vivienne
    School of Psychology, University of Wales Bangor , United Kingdom.
    Strain in nursing care of people with dementia: nurses' experience in Australia, Sweden and United Kingdom2008In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 236-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' experience of strain in dementia care.

    METHOD:

    Focus groups were held with 35 nurses in Sweden, Australia and UK, who care for people with dementia. The discussions were tape-recorded and analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS:

    The nurses described the complexity of their situation and referred to environmental factors such as 'the system', community attitudes, other staff, residents' family members and also their own family. With regard to caring for people with dementia, three main sources of strain could be identified: Being unable to reach; Trying to protect; and Having to balance competing needs.

    CONCLUSION:

    The nurses' experience could be understood as a desire to do the best for the people in their care by trying to alleviate their suffering and enhance their quality of life. When they did not have the resources, opportunity or ability to do this, it caused strain.

  • 2.
    Sjöberg, Marina
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Beck, Ingela
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Rasmussen, Birgit H
    Lund University.
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna.
    Being disconnected from life: meanings of existential loneliness as narrated by frail older people2018In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1357-1364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This study illuminated the meanings of existential loneliness (EL) as narrated by frail older people.

    METHOD: Data were collected through individual narrative interviews with 23 people 76-101 years old receiving long-term care and services. A phenomenological hermeneutical analysis was performed, including a naïve reading and two structural analyses as a basis for a comprehensive understanding of EL.

    RESULT: Four themes were identified related to meanings of EL: (1) being trapped in a frail and deteriorating body; (2) being met with indifference; (3) having nobody to share life with; and (4) lacking purpose and meaning. These intertwined themes were synthesized into a comprehensive understanding of EL as 'being disconnected from life'.

    CONCLUSION: Illness and physical limitation affects access to the world. When being met with indifference and being unable to share one's thoughts and experiences of life with others, a sense of worthlessness is reinforced, triggering an experience of meaninglessness and EL, i.e. disconnection from life. It is urgent to develop support strategies that can be used by health care professionals to address older people in vulnerable situations, thereby facilitating connectedness.

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