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  • 1.
    Masche, J. Gowert
    Kristianstad University, School of Teacher Education.
    Explanation of normative declines in parents' knowledge about their adolescent children2010In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 271-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explain why parental knowledge of adolescents’ whereabouts declines with age. Such an investigation is important because previous studies have established an association between behavior problems and low levels of parental knowledge. A time-sequential sample comprising 2415 adolescents aged 13–18 years was investigated on five annual occasions. Each year, parental knowledge declined by .10 SD. Adolescents’ establishment of a private sphere (less disclosure; defiance) was the most important mediator of age effects on knowledge. Taken together, declining parental control and the establishment of a private sphere explained 37.5% of the age-related decline in knowledge. Parental control was, however, not a significant predictor any longer when disclosure and defiance were controlled for. Results also revealed that some of the mediating variables were stronger in early-to-mid adolescence. Other variables appeared to slow the age-related decline, especially in mid-to-late adolescence. These variables are therefore interpreted as parents’ and adolescents’ attempts to balance autonomy development and connectedness. If this balancing fails, adolescent behavior problems might arise along with low levels of parental knowledge early on.

  • 2.
    Plenty, Stephanie
    et al.
    Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet.
    Östberg, Viveca
    Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet.
    Almqvist, Ylva
    Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Swedish National Institute of Public Health .
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet.
    Psychosocial working conditions: an analysis of emotional symptoms and conduct problems amongst adolescent students2014In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 407-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored how psychosocial features of the schoolwork environment are associated with students' mental health. Data was drawn from 3699 ninth grade (15 year-old) Swedish students participating in the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children survey. Using Structural Equation Modelling, perceived school demands, decision control and social support from teachers, classmates and parents were examined in relation to students' emotional and conduct problems. Higher demands were associated with greater emotional symptoms and conduct problems. Although weaker social support predicted emotional symptoms and conduct problems, the relative influence of teachers, classmates and parents differed. Teacher support was more closely associated with conduct problems, particularly for girls, while classmate support was more strongly related to emotional symptoms. The findings indicate that while excessive school pressure is associated with poorer mental health, social support can assist in optimising adolescents' emotional health and adaptive behaviour, as well as shaping perceptions of demands.

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