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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Urban
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Who needs 3D when the universe is flat?2014In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 412-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An overlooked feature in astronomy education is the need for students to learn to extrapolate three-dimensionality and the challenges that this may involve. Discerning critical features in the night sky that are embedded in dimensionality is a long-term learning process. Several articles have addressed the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) simulations in astronomy education, but they have neither addressed what students discern nor the nature of that discernment. A Web-based questionnaire was designed using links to video clips drawn from a simulation video of travel through our galaxy and beyond. The questionnaire was completed by 137 participants from nine countries across a broad span of astronomy education. The descriptions provided by the participants were analyzed using hermeneutics in combination with a constant comparative approach to formulate six categories of discernment in relation to multidimensionality. These results are used to make the case that the ability to extrapolate three-dimensionality calls for the creation of meaningful motion parallax experiences.

  • 2.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Students' views concerning worldview presuppositions underpinning science: is the world really ordered, uniform, and comprehensible?2014In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 98, no 5, p. 743-765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    That nature and the universe are ordered, uniform, and comprehensible is a starting point in science. However, such worldview presuppositions are often taken for granted, rather than explicitly mentioned, in science and in science class. This article takes a worldview perspective and reports from interviews (N = 26) with upper secondary students on how they view order, uniformity, and comprehensibility. In the article, it is shown that while most students view the universe as ordered and comprehensible, it is common for students to disagree that the universe is uniform. That is, they view scientific laws as only locally valid. In addition, many of them do not know that science builds upon such worldview presuppositions. In some cases, the results show differences between students’ own views and the views they associate with science. For example, it is common for students to state that science views the universe as more comprehensible than they themselves do. The consequences for students’ interests as well as their learning of science are discussed.

  • 3.
    Helldén, Gustav
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Solomon, Joan
    The Open University, Milton Keynes.
    The persistence of personal and social themes in context: long- and short-term studies of students' scientific ideas2004In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 88, no 6, p. 885-900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will examine the persistence of “misconceptions.” We used data from a longitudinal study of personal ideas in 24 students' thinking about ecological processes. The results show students often speaking about personal experiences dating from an early age, to which they had also referred in similar interviews conducted years before. These data are compared with results from a different study of middle school physics students' thinking about energy and steam engines. After the new learning had been “successfull” completed and assessed, old ideas returned. These findings are used to set up a theoretical basis for understanding the longitudinal results. Findings from memory studies are shown to explicate the long-term effects of the passage of time and prompts for the recall of scientific concepts.

  • 4.
    Åberg-Bengtsson, Lisbeth
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    Mid Sweden University.
    Ottosson, Torgny
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik.
    "Can there be a full moon at daytime?”: young students making sense of illustrations of the lunar phases2017In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 101, no 4, p. 616-638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching and learning situations nowadays typically build on richly illustrated material or multimodal presentations. Under these circumstances, the transparency of images and models used for explaining various phenomena becomes central. The present study deals with 20 Swedish children, 9–12 years old, discussing an illustration meant to show the cause of the different appearances of the Moon in the sky. The students’ task was to place eight numbered moon phases in the lunar orbit in the image. The illustration in question was chosen (a) because it was of a kind frequently used to explain the lunar phases and (b) because the phenomenon is known to be difficult to understand for students of all ages. The analysis leans on historical and sociocultural approaches as well as on multimodal semiotics. The results show that a majority of students were able to make sense of the most central features of the illustration but that very few spontaneously reasoned in a way that could be interpreted as the intended meaning-making of the cause of the lunar phases. The results also indicate that the simultaneous adoption of two perspectives necessary for understanding the phenomenon was a stumbling block for most of the students.

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