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  • 1.
    Agevall, Lena
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Broberg, Pernilla
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Auditing, Organisation and Society (AOS). Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Ekonomi och arbetsliv.
    Umans, Timurs
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Ekonomi. Kristianstad University, Research environment Auditing, Organisation and Society (AOS). Linnaeus University.
    The new generation of auditors meeting praxis: dual learning's role in audit students' professional development2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 307-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores whether and in what way “dual learning” can develop understanding of the relationship between structure/judgement and explores audit student’s perceptions of the audit profession. Work Integrated Learning (WIL) module, serving as a tool of enabling dual learning, represents the context for this exploration. The study is based on a focus group and individual interviews conducted with students performing their WIL. Our data and its analysis indicates that when in a WIL context, students develop awareness of the use of standards and checklists on the one hand and the importance of discretional judgement on the other. Based on these results, we theorise as to how dual learning manifests itself in students’ experiences and understanding of the relationship between structure and judgement.

  • 2.
    Eklund-Myrskog, Gunilla
    et al.
    Faculty of Education, Åbo Akademi, Vasa.
    Wenestam, Claes-Göran
    Faculty of Education, Åbo Akademi, Vasa.
    Students' approaches to learning in Finnish general upper secondary school1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 5-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate students' approaches to learning within Finnish general upper secondary school. Students' approaches to learning were further related to variables such as form level, gender and grades in mathematics, English and physical education. Students from three general upper secondary schools (n = 549) were chosen as subjects and their approaches to learning are assessed by the Learning Process Questionnaire (LPQ). As a result of the study, significant differences were found between students' approaches to learning in the different form levels. Students' approaches to learning were further related to gender. Finally, students' approaches to learning were related to their grades in mathematics and English, but not to their grades in physical education.

  • 3.
    Elgström, Ole
    et al.
    Lund university.
    Hellstenius, Mats
    Kristianstad University, School of Teacher Education.
    How history became a core subject in Swedish upper secondary schools2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 565-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2004, history was introduced by a Parliamentary decision as a new core subject in the Swedish upper secondary school system. This event constituted a major break—history now became a compulsory subject for all upper secondary school students after having been subject to a continually diminishing number of teaching hours ever since 1945. This surprising change forms the puzzle that this article seeks to address. Based on interviews and documentary analysis, we map and interpret the decision‐making processes that ended with the Parliamentary decision to make history a new core subject. We add to existing insights about curriculum change by interpreting the process in terms of negotiation, persuasion, and framing and by linking actor strategies to structural—ideational and material—changes that created a window of opportunity for policy entrepreneurs.

  • 4.
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Personal context and continuity of human thought as recurrent themes in a longitudinal study2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 205-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study of personal context and continuity in 23 students' thinking builds upon data from a longitudinal study of the students' conceptualisations of ecological processes. Each student was interviewed 11 times from age 9-15 about these processes. At the ages of 15 and 19, the students listened to what they said at the age of 11 and 15, respectively, and described how they thought their understanding had developed. The occurrence of charac teristic individual elements in the students' conceptions can be followed as themes in the interviews year by year. The students could, as 15- and 19-year-olds, often reveal concrete experiences from an early age that they referred to repeatedly in the interviews. Even if there was a substantial conceptual development, there was also a very strong element of personal continuity. Conceptions that had developed at an early age seemed to be important for future conceptual development.

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