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  • 1.
    Fridberg, Marie
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Thulin, Susanne
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU).
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Preschool children's collaborative science learning scaffolded by tablets2017In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 1007-1026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a project aiming to extend the current understanding of how emerging technologies, i.e. tablets, can be used in preschools to support collaborative learning of real-life science phenomena. The potential of tablets to support collaborative inquiry-based science learning and reflective thinking in preschool is investigated through the analysis of teacher-led activities on science, including children making timelapse photography and Slowmation movies. A qualitative analysis of verbal communication during different learning contexts gives rise to a number of categories that distinguish and identify different themes of the discussion. In this study, groups of children work with phase changes of water. We report enhanced and focused reasoning about this science phenomenon in situations where timelapse movies are used to stimulate recall. Furthermore, we show that children communicate in a more advanced manner about the phenomenon, and they focus more readily on problem solving when active in experimentation or Slowmation producing contexts.

  • 2.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Lower secondary students' views in astrobiology2013In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 1957-1978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Astrobiology is, on a profound level, about whether life exists outside of theplanet Earth. The question of existence of life elsewhere in the universe has been of interestto many societies throughout history. Recently, the research area of astrobiology has grownat a fast rate, mainly due to the development of observational methods, and the media isfrequently reporting on new research findings. International surveys show that astrobiologyquestions are among those that interest young people the most. The popularity of astrobiologyand the way it captures much science content makes it an interesting area for scienceteaching. However, there is very little research directly focused upon students’ views inastrobiology. The study reported in this paper draws from the answers of 186 Swedish lowersecondary students (16 years old) to a questionnaire, with closed and open-ended questionsregarding their views of issues in astrobiology. The study was guided by the worldviewtheory (Cobern 1991; Cobern, Science Education 80(5):579–610, 1996; Cobern, Scienceand Education 9:219–246, 2000). The results show that even though basic reasoning inastrobiology is known by a majority of the students, there is a considerable number ofstudents, for whom this is not the case. Furthermore, it was found that for all questions, thereare students answering in different ways when asked to describe their own view and the viewthey associate with science researchers. The implications of the study for further researchand for the teaching of astrobiology in science class are discussed.

  • 3.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science.
    Swedish upper secondary students' views of the origin and development of the universe2006In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 355-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is addressing how students reason about the origin and development of the universe. Students’ own views as well as their descriptions of physical models are analysed. Data consists of written surveys, and interviews of a subset of the students. Most of the students relate to the Big Bang model when describing the origin of the universe. The study however shows that this can mean different things to the students. The article also addresses views of whether or not the universe changes and of the origin of the elements. When comparing students’ own views with their views of the physics view this study shows that there are students who have a different view of their own than the view they connect with physics. This shows that students, in the area of cosmology, do not necessarily take the view they connect with physics to be their own. Examples of students who handle the physics view in different ways are discussed. There are students who relate not only to science but also to a religious worldview when describing their own view. This shows that when discussing cosmology in class, also a religious worldview can be relevant for parts of the student group.

  • 4.
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Exploring understandings and responses to science: a program of longitudinal studies2005In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 99-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will report on the development of a research program by a group of science educators at Kristianstad University, which has its roots in a longitudinal study I conducted concerning students’ developing understandings of ecological processes. Following the insights generated in this first study concerning the nature of student understandings, and the potential of the longitudinal design, a research group has developed at Kristianstad which has extended this work into related areas. This paper will describe my own work and its development, and link it with three projects that use a longitudinal design, which we have subsequently undertaken and in some cases completed. The emphasis within the paper will be on the findings generated by these studies on student learning and response to science, and the particular features of the longitudinal design that allow such insights to emerge. The paper will explore patterns of change, and continuity, as a way of appreciating the particular contributions of longitudinal studies.

  • 5.
    Leden, Lotta
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Nature of science progression in school year 1–9: a case study of teachers’ suggestions and rationales2019In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 591-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inclusion of nature of science (NOS) in science education has for a long  time been regarded as crucial. There is, however, a lack of research on appropriate NOS aspects for different educational levels. An even more neglected area of research is that focusing on teachers’ perspectives on NOS teaching at different levels. The aim of this article is to examine NOS progression in the light of teachers’ suggestions and rationales. In order to obtain teachers’ informed perspectives, we chose to involve six teachers (teaching grades 1–9) in a 3-year research project. They took part in focus group discussions about NOS and NOS teaching as well as implemented jointly planned NOS teaching sessions. Data that this article builds on was collected at the end of the project. The teachers’ suggestions for NOS progression often relied on adding more NOS issues at every stage, thereby creating the foundations of a broader but not necessarily deeper understanding of NOS. Five rationales, for if/when specific NOS issues are appropriate to introduce, emerged from the analysis of the teacher discussions. Some of these rationales, including practice makes perfect and increasing levels of depth can potentially accommodate room for many NOS issues in the science classroom, while maturity and experience instead has a restricting effect on NOS teaching. Also, choice of context and teaching approaches play an important role in teachers’ rationales for whether specific NOS issues  should be included or not at different stages. The article discusses the implications for teacher education and professional development.

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