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  • 1.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Marketing the ’Broad Line’: invitations to STEM education in a Swedish recruitment campaign2013In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 147-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many Western societies, there is a concern about the tendency of young people not choosing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education and occupations. In response, different initiatives have been launched. If one believes that science should have a place in more young people's lives, an important question is to what extent recruitment campaigns communicate messages that open up for STEM education to become relevant in young people's identity formation. Here, we analyse a Swedish government-initiated, primarily Internet-based recruitment attempt (‘The Broad Line Campaign’) aimed at increasing the number of young people choosing the natural science programme in upper secondary school. The campaign is based on marketing principles and deliberately draws on identity issues. The data analysed consists of campaign films and written resources describing the campaign. Data are analysed by use of the constant comparative approach in order to produce categories describing different messages about why to engage in STEM education. These messages are then analysed from an identity perspective using the concept of subjective values. Our results show that the messages communicated in the Broad Line campaign emphasise utility value, attainment value and relative cost rather than interest-enjoyment. The campaign communicates that the natural science programme is to be associated with a high attainment value without establishing relations to the field of science. Finally, potential consequences of the communicated messages in the campaign are discussed in light of previous research.

  • 2.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Recruitment campaigns as a tool for social and cultural reproduction of scientific communities: a case study on how scientists invite young people to science2014In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 1985-2008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young people's interest in pursuing science and science-intense educations has been expressed as a concern in relation to societal, economic and democratic development by various stakeholders (governments, industry and university). From the perspective of the scientific communities, the issues at stake do not necessarily correspond to the overall societal aims. Rather, initiatives to recruit young people to science are also ways for the scientific community to engage in the social and cultural reproduction of itself. For a community to survive and produce a future, it needs to secure regeneration of itself in succeeding generations. The aim of this study is to, from a perspective of social and cultural production/reproduction, shed light on an initiative from the scientific community to recruit young people to science education. This is a case study of one recruitment campaign called the Chemistry Advent calendar. The calendar consists of 25 webcasted films, produced and published by the science/technology faculty at a university. The analysed data consist of the films and additional published material relating to the campaign such as working reports and articles published about the campaign. The analysis focussed on what messages are communicated to potential newcomers. The messages were categorised by means of a framework of subjective values. The results are discussed both from a perspective of how the messages mirror traditions and habits of the scientific community, and in relation to research on students' educational choices.

  • 3.
    Gustavsson, Laila
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP).
    Jonsson, Agneta
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik.
    Ljung-Djärf, Agneta
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik.
    Thulin, Susanne
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP).
    Ways of dealing with science learning: a study based on Swedish early childhood education practice2016In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 38, no 11, p. 1867-1881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish school system offers curriculum-based early childhood education (ECE) organised as preschool (for 0–5-year-olds) and preschool class (for 6-year-olds). The intention to create a playful and educational environment based on children’s perspectives, interests, and questions is strongly based on historical and cultural traditions. This article develops knowledge of ECE teachers’ approaches to science-learning situations. The study applies a phenomenographic approach. The analysis is based on approximately 9.5 hours of video documentation of teacher-led and child-initiated Swedish ECE science activities. We identified two descriptive categories and four subcategories dealing with science-learning situations: (A) making anything visible, containing the three subcategories (Aa) addressing everyone, (Ab) addressing everything, and (Ac) addressing play and fantasy; and (B) creating a shared space for learning (Ba) addressing common content. These categories are related to how efforts to take advantage of children’s perspectives are interpreted and addressed in educational practice. The article discusses and exemplifies the use of various categories and their potential implications for ECE learning practice.

  • 4.
    Jönsson, Anders
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Student performance on argumentation task in the Swedish National Assessment in science2016In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 38, no 11, p. 1825-1840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of content knowledge on students’ socio- scientific argumentation in the Swedish National Assessment in biology, chemistry and physics for 12-year-olds. In Sweden, the assessment of socio-scientific argumentation has been a major part of the National Assessment during three consecutive years and this study utilizes data on student performance to investigate (a) the relationship between tasks primarily addressing argumentation and tasks addressing primarily content knowledge as well as (b) students’ performance on argumentation tasks, which differ in relation to content, subject, aspect of argumentation and assessment criteria. Findings suggest a strong and positive relationship between content knowledge and students’ performance on argumentation tasks.The analysis also provides some hypotheses about the task difficulty of argumentation tasks that may be pursued in future investigations.

  • 5.
    Jönsson, Anders
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Leden, Lotta
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    The ambiguous influence of high-stakes testing on science teaching in Sweden2019In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tests convey messages about what to teach and how to assess. Bothof these dimensions may either broaden or become more uniformand narrow as a consequence of high-stakes testing. This studyaimed to investigate how Swedish science teachers wereinfluenced by national, high-stakes testing in science, specificallyfocusing on instances where teachers’ pedagogical practices werebroadened and/or narrowed. The research design is qualitativethematic analysis of focus group data, from group discussions withSwedish science teachers. The total sample consists of six teachers,who participated in 12 focus group discussion during threeconsecutive years. Findings suggest that the national testsinfluence teachers’ pedagogical practice by being used as asubstitute for the national curriculum. Since the teachers do notwant their students to fail the tests, they implement new contentthat is introduced by the tests and thereby broaden their existingpractice. However, when this new content is not seen as alegitimate part of teachers’ established teaching traditions, theinterpretation and implementation of this content may replicatethe operationalisations made by the test developers, even thoughthese operationalisations are restricted by demands forstandardisation and reliable scoring. Consequently, the testssimultaneously broaden and narrow teachers’ pedagogical practices.

  • 6.
    Ljung-Djärf, Agneta
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Magnusson, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Peterson, Sam
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    From doing to learning: changed focus during a pre-school learning study project on organic decomposition2014In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 659-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explored the use of the learning study (LS) model in developing Swedish pre-school science learning. This was done by analysing a 3-cycle LS project implemented to help a group of pre-school teachers (n?=?5) understand their science educational practice, by collaboratively and systematically challenging it. Data consisted of video recordings of 1 screening (n?=?7), 1 initial planning meeting, 3 analysis meetings, 3 interventions, and 78 individual test interviews with the children (n?=?26). The study demonstrated that the teachers were initially uncomfortable with using scientific concepts and with maintaining the children's focus on the object of learning without framing it with play. During the project, we noted a shift in focus towards the object of learning and how to get the children to discern it. As teachers? awareness changed, enhanced learning was noted among the children. The study suggests that the LS model can promote pre-school science learning as follows: by building on, re-evaluating, and expanding children's experiences; and by helping the teachers focus on and contrast critical aspects of an object of learning, and to reflect on the use of play, imagination, and concepts and on directing the children's focus when doing so. Our research showed that the LS model holds promise to advance pre-school science learning by offering a theoretical tool useable to shift the focus from doing to learning while teaching science using learning activities.

  • 7.
    Löfgren, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    A longitudinal study showing how students use a molecule concept when explaining everyday situations2009In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 1631-1655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present results from a 10-year (1997-2006) longitudinal study in which we, by interviews once or twice every year, followed how students, throughout the compulsory school, developed their understanding of three situations in which transformations of matter occur. We believe that students have to meet scientific ideas early in order to gradually, in social cooperation with classmates, friends, teachers, and other grown-ups, elaborate the meaning of a concept. We followed 23 students all born in 1990. In 1997 we introduced the idea of the particulate nature of matter. We have conducted interviews allowing students to explain the transformation of matter in fading leaves left lying on the ground, burning candles, and a glass of water with a lid on. In the interview at 16 years of age, less than one-fifth of the students use molecular ideas in scientifically acceptable ways. The overall conclusion is that most students do not connect the knowledge they gain in school about the particulate nature of matter to these everyday situations. On the other hand, the students seem capable of using a simple particle model and the model can help them understand the invisible gas state. The question of how to use this capability in order to develop students' scientific ideas is still not solved and more research is argued for.

  • 8.
    Magntorn, Ola
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Reading new environments: students' ability to generalise their understanding between different ecosystems2007In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 67-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on a study of how students' read nature in different ecosystems. Its focus is on ecology and the context is outdoors. This literacy has to do with an ability to recognise organisms and relate them to material cycling and energy flow in the specific habitat that is to be read. A teaching sequence was designed in order to develop a class of secondary students' ability to read nature in a forest ecosystem. After instruction they were taken to another ecosystem, a pond where they were asked to read the new environment. The main goal was to follow to what extent they can transfer their understanding from one ecosystem to another. The study is based on recorded interviews, field work, and classroom activities, and it shows the importance of learning general patterns in nature and relating them to functional groups of organisms in an ecosystem.

  • 9.
    Magntorn, Ola
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Helldén, Gustav
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Student-teachers' ability to read nature: reflections on their own learning in ecology2005In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 1229-1254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses student-teachers' ability to read nature in a woodland habitat before and after a 10-week ecology course. Reading nature is our definition of the ability to observe, describe and explain basic ecology in the field. Data consists of field-based pre-course and post-course interviews followed up by metacognitive interviews where students analyse their own learning. A bi-dimensional coding scheme is adopted to examine the range and development of students' ability to read nature. Students find it important to know the ecology of a few key species and they recognize the importance of having learned the language of ecology - ecologish - helping them to describe and discuss ecology. Students generally recognize the excursions as key learning situations in ecology education but they give different reasons for finding excursions so important. This variation will be elaborated in the paper together with the implications for teaching ecology.

  • 10.
    Redfors, Andreas
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Ryder, Jim
    University of Leeds.
    University physics students' use of models in explanations of phenomena involving interaction between metals and radiation2001In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 23, no 12, p. 1283-1301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine third year university physics students' use of models when explaining familiar phenomena involving interaction between metals and electromagnetic radiation. A range of scientific models are available to explain these phenomena. However, explanations of these phenomena tend not to be used as exemplars of scientific models within undergraduate physics education. The student sample is drawn from six universities in UK and Sweden. These students have difficulties in providing appropriate explanations for the phenomena. Many students draw upon the Bohr model of isolated atoms when explaining light emission of metals. The students tend not to recognize that atoms in metals interact to give an electronic structure very different from that of the isolated atom. Few students use a single model consistently in their explanations of these related phenomena. Rather, students' use of models is sensitive to the context in which each phenomenon is presented to them.

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