hkr.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bieri, Regina Alessandri
    et al.
    University of Bern.
    Adriaens, Laurence
    University of Bern.
    Spörri, Stefan
    State Hospital of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.
    Lang, Niklaus P
    The University of Hong Kong.
    Persson, G. Rutger
    University of Bern & University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA .
    Gingival fluid cytokine expression and subgingival bacterial counts during pregnancy and postpartum: a case series.2013In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 19-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess gingival fluid (GCF) cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, subgingival bacteria, and clinical periodontal conditions during a normal pregnancy to postpartum.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Subgingival bacterial samples were analyzed with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method. GCF samples were assessed with real-time PCR including five proinflammatory cytokines and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor.

    RESULTS: Nineteen pregnant women with a mean age of 32 years (S.D. ± 4 years, range 26-42) participated in the study. Full-mouth bleeding scores (BOP) decreased from an average of 41.2% (S.D. ± 18.6%) at the 12th week of pregnancy to 26.6% (S.D. ± 14.4%) at the 4-6 weeks postpartum (p < 0.001). Between week 12 and 4-6 weeks postpartum, the mean probing pocket depth changed from 2.4 mm (S.D. ± 0.4) to 2.3 mm (S.D. ± 0.3) (p = 0.34). Higher counts of Eubacterium saburreum, Parvimonas micra, Selenomonas noxia, and Staphylococcus aureus were found at week 12 of pregnancy than at the 4-6 weeks postpartum examinations (p < 0.001). During and after pregnancy, statistically significant correlations between BOP scores and bacterial counts were observed. BOP scores and GCF levels of selected cytokines were not related to each other and no differences in GCF levels of the cytokines were observed between samples from the 12th week of pregnancy to 4-6 weeks postpartum. Decreasing postpartum counts of Porphyromonas endodontalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were associated with decreasing levels of Il-8 and Il-1β.

    CONCLUSIONS: BOP decreased after pregnancy without any active periodontal therapy. Associations between bacterial counts and cytokine levels varied greatly in pregnant women with gingivitis and a normal pregnancy outcome. Postpartum associations between GCF cytokines and bacterial counts were more consistent.

    CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Combined assessments of gingival fluid cytokines and subgingival bacteria may provide important information on host response.

  • 2.
    Erovic Ademovski, Seida
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Oral Hälsa - Allmänhälsa - Livskvalitet.
    Persson, G. Rutger
    Department of Periodontology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern.
    Winkel, Edwin
    Academic Centre for Oral Health, Department of Periodontology, University Medical Centre Groningen.
    Tangerman, Albert
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen.
    Lingström, Peter
    Department of Cariology, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Renvert, Stefan
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Oral Hälsa - Allmänhälsa - Livskvalitet.
    The short-term treatment effects on the microbiota at the dorsum of the tongue in intra-oral halitosis patients: a randomized clinical trial2013In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 463-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives This study aims to assess the effects of rinsing with zinc- and chlorhexidine-containing mouth rinse with or without adjunct tongue scraping on volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in breath air, and the microbiota at the dorsum of the tongue. Material and methods A randomized single-masked controlled clinical trial with a cross-over study design over 14 days including 21 subjects was performed. Bacterial samples from the dorsum of the tongue were assayed by checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization. Results No halitosis (identified by VSC assessments) at day 14 was identified in 12/21 subjects with active rinse alone, in 10/21with adjunct use of tongue scraper, in 1/21 for negative control rinse alone, and in 3/21 in the control and tongue scraping sequence. At day 14, significantly lower counts were identified only in the active rinse sequence ( p &lt; 0.001) for 15/78 species including , Fusobacterium sp., Porphyromonas gingivalis , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Staphylococcus aureus , and Tannerella forsythia . A decrease in bacteria from baseline to day 14 was found in successfully treated subjects for 9/74 species including: P. gingivalis , Prevotella melaninogenica , S. aureus , and Treponema denticola . Baseline VSC scores were correlated with several bacterial species. The use of a tongue scraper combined with active rinse did not change the levels of VSC compared to rinsing alone. Conclusions VSC scores were not associated with bacterial counts in samples taken from the dorsum of the tongue. The active rinse alone containing zinc and chlorhexidine had effects on intra-oral halitosis and reduced bacterial counts of species associated with malodor. Tongue scraping provided no beneficial effects on the microbiota studied. Clinical relevance Periodontally healthy subjects with intra-oral halitosis benefit from daily rinsing with zinc- and chlorhexidine-containing mouth rinse.

  • 3.
    Hallström, Hadar
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Persson, G. Rutger
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Oral Health - Public Health - Quality of Life.
    Strömberg, Ulf
    Halland Hospital.
    Twetman, Svante
    University of Copenhagen.
    Renvert, Stefan
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Oral Health - Public Health - Quality of Life.
    Reproducibility of subgingival bacterial samples from patients with peri-implant mucositis2015In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 1063-1068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the reproducibility of bacterial enumeration from subsequent subgingival samples collected from patients with peri-implant mucositis.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Duplicate microbial samples from 222 unique implant sites in 45 adult subjects were collected with paper points and analyzed using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. Whole genomic probes of 74 preselected bacterial species were used. Based on the bacterial scores, Cohen's kappa coefficient was used to calculate the inter-annotator agreement for categorical data. The percentage agreement was considered as "good" when the two samples showed the same score or differed by 1 to the power of 10.

    RESULTS: Moderate to fair kappa values were displayed for all bacterial species in the test panel (range 0.21-0.58). There were no significant differences between Gram-positive and Gram-negative species. The percentage of good agreement between the first and second samples averaged 74.7 % (n = 74; range 56-83 %), while the proportion of poor agreement ranged from 1 to 19 % for the various strains.

    CONCLUSION: While an acceptable clinical agreement was obtained in most cases, diverging bacterial scores may appear in subgingival samples collected at the same time point from patients with peri-implant mucositis.

    CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The broad bulky base of implant crowns may present an obstacle for the collection of reproducible subgingival samples with paper points.

  • 4.
    Juusela, Pirjo L.
    et al.
    Finland.
    Persson, G. Rutger
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap III. Kristianstad University, Research environment Oral Health - Public Health - Quality of Life.
    Nieminen, Anja R.
    Finland.
    Kiuru-Enari, Sari M.
    Finland.
    Uitto, Veli-Jukka
    Finland.
    Relation of gelsolin amyloidosis and periodontal health2015In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 229-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (AGel amyloidosis) is a rare, dominantly inherited systemic disease with worldwide distribution, caused by a gelsolin gene mutation. We studied the periodontal conditions and microbiological plaque composition of AGel amyloidosis patients.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A voluntary study group of 36 AGel amyloidosis patients (mean age 61) filled in a questionnaire. A thorough periodontal examination included periodontal pocket depth and attachment level measurements, registrations of visible plaque, bleeding on probing and panoramic radiographs. The presence of oral Candida was studied by fungal culture method. Bacterial samples from deepened pockets (≥4 mm) were analyzed with checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method.

    RESULTS: VPI (15.3 %) and BOP (11.2 %) of the patients were modest reflecting relatively adequate oral self-care. Still 89 % of the patients had at least one PPD of ≥4 mm; 78.5 % of the PPDs ≥6 mm were found in molars. Patients had lost one third of the molars due to periodontitis and/or tooth decay. Half of the patients (53 %) were Candida carriers. Bacterial analysis of subgingival plaque samples revealed bacterial species common to chronic periodontitis.

    CONCLUSION: AGel amyloidosis may increase the risk for periodontitis even when the oral self-care is adequate. Molar teeth appear to be mostly affected, leading to tooth loss.

    CLINICAL RELEVANCE: AGel amyloidosis as a systemic disease is related with a vast variety of symptoms with variable severity. Even though a causal relationship of the systemic disease and periodontitis has not yet been proven, increased risk for periodontal problems should be considered when examining AGel amyloidosis patients.

  • 5.
    Lauenstein, Marc
    et al.
    Department of Periodontology, University of Bern.
    Kaufmann, Marion
    Department of Periodontology, University of Bern.
    Persson, G. Rutger
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Oral Hälsa - Allmänhälsa - Livskvalitet.
    Clinical and microbiological results following nonsurgical periodontal therapy with or without local administration of piperacillin/tazobactam2013In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 1645-1660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: We assessed if adjunct administration of piperacillin/tazobactam added clinical and microbiological treatment benefits.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six subjects (mean age 52.1 years (SD ± 10.3)) (NS by group) with chronic periodontitis were randomly enrolled receiving subgingival debridement and the local administration of piperacillin/tazobactam (test group) or debridement alone (control group). Bleeding on probing (BOP), probing pocket depth (PPD), and microbiological counts of 74 species were studied by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization up to month 6 after treatment.

    RESULTS: Mean PPD changes between baseline and month 6 in the test and control groups were 1.5 and 1.8 mm, respectively (NS between groups). BOP in both groups decreased from about 80 to 40 %. At 4 and 12 weeks, lower counts of the following bacteria were found in the test group (site level): Fusobacterium species, Parvimonas micra, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and a composite load of nine pathogens (p < 0.001). At week 26, subjects receiving local antibiotics had a lower prevalence at tested sites for Fusobacterium nucleatum sp. polymorphum, Fusobacterium periodonticum, P. micra, and T. denticola.

    CONCLUSIONS: At 26 weeks, treatment with or without piperacillin/tazobactam resulted in similar BOP and PPD improvements. At week 26 and at the subject level, the prevalence of 4/74 pathogens was found at lower counts in the group receiving local antibiotics.

    CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Administration of piperacillin/tazobactam reduces the prevalence of Fusobacterium, P. micra, and T. denticola to a greater extent than debridement alone but with no short-term differences in PPD or BOP.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Helena
    et al.
    Halland Hospital.
    Berglund, Johan Sanmartin
    Blekinge Institute of Technology & Lund University.
    Renvert, Stefan
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Oral hälsa och folkhälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Oral Health - Public Health - Quality of Life (OHAL).
    Periodontitis, tooth loss and cognitive functions among older adults2018In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 2103-2109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the potential association between periodontitis, the number of teeth and cognitive functions in a cohort of older adults in Sweden.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: In total, 775 individuals from 60 to 99 years of age were selected for the study. A clinical and radiographic examination was performed. The number of teeth and prevalence of periodontal pockets and bone loss was calculated and categorised. Cognitive functions were assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and clock test. The education level was obtained from a questionnaire. Data were analysed using chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression.

    RESULTS: Age and gender were associated with the prevalence of bone loss. Age and education were associated with lower number of teeth. Gender was also associated with the presence of pockets. The multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated a statistically significant association between prevalence of bone loss, the number of teeth and the outcome on MMSE test. This association remained even after adjustment for age, education and gender. Tooth loss was also associated with lower outcome on clock test. Presence of periodontal pockets ≥ 5 mm was not associated with cognitive test outcome.

    CONCLUSIONS: A history of periodontitis and tooth loss may be of importance for cognitive functions among older adults.

    CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Diseases with and inflammatory profile may have an impact on cognitive decline.

  • 7.
    Renvert, Stefan
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap III. Kristianstad University, Research environment Oral Health - Public Health - Quality of Life.
    Wallin-Bengtsson, Viveca
    Public Dental Health Services, Kristianstad.
    Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Persson, G. Rutger
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap III. Kristianstad University, Research environment Oral Health - Public Health - Quality of Life.
    Periodontitis in older Swedish individuals fails to predict mortality2015In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 193-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This study aims to assess mortality risk and its association to health aspects in dentate individuals 60 years of age and older.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical and periodontal data from 870 dentate individuals (age range 60-96) participating in the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Blekinge (SNAC-Blekinge) with survival statistics over 6 years were studied.

    RESULTS: During 6 years of follow-up, 42/474 of the individuals (8.9 %), who at baseline were between age 60 and 75, and 134/396 individuals of the individuals (33.9 %), who at baseline were ≥75 years, died. Surviving dentate individuals had more teeth (mean 19.3, S.D. ± 7.9) than those who died (mean 15.9, S.D. ± 7.3; mean diff 3,3; S.E. mean diff 0.7; 95 % CI 2.0, 4.6; p = 0.001). A self-reported history of high blood pressure (F = 15.0, p < 0.001), heart failure (F = 24.5, p < 0.001, observed power = 0.99), older age (F = 34.7, p < 0.001), male gender (F = 6.3, p < 0.01), serum HbA1c with 6.5 % as cutoff level (F = 9.3, p = 0.002) were factors associated with mortality. A medical diagnosis of heart disease, diabetes, any form of cancer, or periodontitis failed to predict mortality.

    CONCLUSIONS: A self-reported history of angina pectoris, chronic heart failure, elevated serum HbA1c, and few remaining teeth were associated with mortality risk. A professional diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, or periodontitis was not predictive of mortality.

    CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Self-health reports are important to observe in the assessment of disease and survival in older individual.

  • 8.
    Wallin Bengtsson, Viveca
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research environment Oral Health - Public Health - Quality of Life (OHAL). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för oral hälsa.
    Persson, Rutger G
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research environment Oral Health - Public Health - Quality of Life (OHAL). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för oral hälsa. USA.
    Berglund, Johan
    Institute of Technology.
    Renvert, Stefan
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research environment Oral Health - Public Health - Quality of Life (OHAL). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för oral hälsa.
    Carotid calcifications in panoramic radiographs are associated with future stroke or ischemic heart diseases: a long-term follow-up study2019In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 1171-1179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess if carotid calcifications detected in panoramic radiographs are associated with future events of stroke, and/or ischemic heart diseases over 10-13 years in individuals between 60 and 96 years.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Baseline (2001-2004) panoramic radiographs were assessed for evidence of carotid calcifications from individuals with no previous history of stroke and/or ischemic heart diseases. A radiopaque nodular mass adjacent to the cervical vertebrae, at or below the intervertebral space C3-C4, was interpreted as carotid calcification. Annual medical records were searched for ICD 10 codes through 2014.

    RESULTS: Signs of carotid calcification was demonstrated in 238/635 (37.5%) of the study individuals. Signs of carotid calcification was associated with future stroke and/or ischemic heart diseases (χ2 = 9.1, OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2, 2.2, p < 0.002). In individuals 60-72 years, a significant association between radiographic signs of carotid calcification and stroke and/or ischemic heart diseases (χ2 = 12.4, OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.5, 4.0, p < 0.000) (adjusted for high blood pressure, diabetes type 2, BMI; OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1, 3.5, p = 0.03). Individuals (60-72 years) with radiographic evidence of carotid calcifications had a mean cumulative stroke and/or ischemic heart diseases survival time of 12.1 years compared to those without such evidence (13.0 years) (log rank Mantel-Cox χ2 = 10.7, p = 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Evidence of carotid calcifications in panoramic radiographs is associated with an event of stroke and/or ischemic heart diseases in 60-96-year-old individuals.

    CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Radiographic evidence of carotid calcifications is associated with stroke and/or ischemic heart diseases. Patients with signs of carotid calcifications should therefore be referred for medical examination.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf