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  • 1. Arzel, Céline
    et al.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Time use, foraging behavior and microhabitat use in a temporary guild of spring-staging dabbling ducks (Anas spp.)2004In: Ornis Fennica, ISSN 0030-5685, Vol. 81, no 4, p. 157-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dabbling ducks were studied on a eutrophic mid-flyway staging site in spring. Six species made up a temporary guild, in order of decreasing abundance they were: Teal (Anas crecca), Shoveler (A. clypeata), Mallard (A. platyrhynchos), Wigeon (A. penelope), Pintail (A. acuta), and Garganey (A. querquedula). Species richness and total abundance peaked around 20 April, whereas guild evenness was highest after the staging peak. Time use during the staging peak differed between the sexes in Mallard, but not in the other species. Mallard spent the least time foraging, whereas Shoveler and Teal foraged the most. Foraging behavior differed among species; i.e. Wigeon was mainly on land, Shoveler mainly fed from the water surface, whilst Mallard and Teal were more generalist. For the guild as a whole, shallow inshore areas were overused compared to offshore habitats. Microhabitat use of foraging birds differed among species; Pintail and Shoveler mainly fed in the offshore end of the habitat gradient, whereas Teal, Garganey, female Mallard, and especially Wigeon used shallow microhabitats. Teal and female Mallard had the highest overlap in microhabitat use, Shoveler and Wigeon had the least. Abundance of invertebrate prey was low during the staging peak, but increased sharply thereafter. This study indicates that eutrophic mid-flyway sites may offer less food to staging birds than do breeding lakes to which many of them are headed.

  • 2.
    Dalby, Lars
    et al.
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Christensen, Thomas K.
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Clausen, Preben
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Einarsson, Árni
    Myvatn Research Station, Iceland.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Fox, Anthony D.
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Holmqvist, Niklas
    Swedish Association for Hunting and Wildlife Management, Öster Malma, Nyköping.
    Langendoen, Tom
    Wetlands International, Wageningen.
    Lehikoinen, Aleksi
    Finnish Museum of Natural History, University of Helsinki.
    Lindström, Åke
    Department of Biology,Biodiversity, Lund University.
    Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Trondheim.
    Nilsson, Leif
    Department of Biology, Biodiversity, Lund University.
    Pöysä, Hannu
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Joensuu Game and Fisheries Research.
    Sigfússon, Arnór Þ.
    Verkís, Reykjavik.
    Svenning, Jens-Christian
    Ecoinformatics & Biodiversity Group, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    The status of the Nordic populations of the Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) in a changing world2013In: Ornis Fennica, ISSN 0030-5685, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 2-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dabbling ducks (Anas spp.) are importantmigratory quarry species, protected as a shared resource under international legislation. However, there is a lack of sufficient high-quality data on vital demographic rates and long-term trends in numbers to judge the conservation status of many duck populations at the flyway level. In response to reported declines in the North-West European flyway population of theMallard, we compiled available data on this species in the Nordic countries up to 2010. Generally, national breeding numbers showed increasing trends, wintering abundance showed variable trends, and productivitymeasures indicated stable or increasing trends.Major knowledge gaps were identified, namely the size of hunting bags, the influence of the released Mallards and the role of short-stopping in explaining changing patterns of wintering abundance across the North-West European flyway. Numerically the Nordic breeding population appears in “good condition”, and the wintering numbers have been either stable or increasing in the last two decades. The annual number of releases needs to be determined in order to judge the sustainability of the current levels of exploitation. Overall, none of the indicators showed alarming signs for the Mallard population in the Nordic countries when considered in isolation. However, the widespread decline in wintering numbers elsewhere across North-western Europe requires urgent pan-European action.

  • 3. Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Edenius, L.
    Abundance patterns in bird communities in old boreal forest in relation to stand structure and local habitat configuration1999In: Ornis Fennica, ISSN 0030-5685, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 123-133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Felton, Adam
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp.
    Lindbladh, Matts
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man and Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Felton, Annika M.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp.
    Andersson, Erik
    Stockholm University.
    Sekercioglu, Cagan H.
    University of Utah.
    Collingham, Yvonne
    Durham University.
    Huntley, Brian
    Durham University.
    Projecting impacts of anthropogenic climatic change on the bird communities of southern Swedish spruce monocultures: will the species poor get poorer?2014In: Ornis Fennica, ISSN 0030-5685, Vol. 91, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential impact of climatic change on bird species’ distributions in Europe was recently modeled for several scenarios of projected late 21st century climate. The results indicate mean range shifts of hundreds of kilometres north for many of European bird species. Here we consider the implications from such distributional shifts for the bird communities of Norway spruce (Picea abies) monocultures in southern Sweden, a forest type likely to remain prevalent due to forestry, despite climate change. Our assessment led us to three key findings. First, the monocultures offer suitable habitat to only two bird species projected to extend their breeding distribution northwards into southern Sweden this century. Second, species richness was projected to decline overall, which would accentuate the depauperate nature of these stands. Third, all conifer-associated arboreal granivores and three of four conifer-associated arboreal insectivores were projected not to occur, reducing both the functional richness and functional redundancy. We discuss caveats related to our approach, including the potential for bioclimatic projections – used in this study – to be hampered by the artificial retention of dominant vegetation. We also discuss the implications of our results for avian biodiversity in what is today the most prevalent forest type in southern Sweden and in many other regions of Europe.

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