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  • 1.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Bring the noise2013In: International Journal of Art, Culture and Design Technologies, ISSN 2155-4196, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 26-35, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article the author will present how they developed different processes for collectively producing a seriesexplorative soundscapes and mechanical artefacts using specific constraints influenced by theories from artand architecture. The author will show how they worked with a design methodology that brought togetheran editor and the final expression of the artwork into one surface of interaction and execution using a virtualcityscape as an iterative ground for sound and music explorations, and give some examples of the differentprototypes and iterations. The author will also discuss how they tweaked/iterated with the parameters of the framework, the sounds and the final visual expression to match their artistic intention, and finally to bringsome noise into Abadyl. Also influencing the overall framework.

  • 2.
    Johansson, Michael
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Department of Design. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, DARC research environment.
    Gehmann, Ulrich
    ISWG.
    Siess, Andreas
    Department of EMT at Bonn-Rhein-Sieg University of Applied Sciences, German.
    Abstraction and resilience: symbolics and space2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In our recent work on the topic ‘resilient communities’ for a workshop at the Venice Biennale 2021, Ideal Spaces Working Group investigates different aspects of spatial creation: the history of ideas, formats of representing space and tools of construction in historical, contemporary and built environments of the future. We address how abstract conceptions underlying assumptions, imagination and concrete views shape spatial construction and its representations, and how spatial creation tries to organize meaning and influence perception and understanding, shaping both the city and its inhabitants. With regard to the built environment, resilience depends on how a space is perceived by its inhabitants and how spaces designed for communities reflect this, especially their symbolic properties as ideal spaces for communal living. These properties are connected to the ways in which space is expressed via its overall shape as gestalt. In this respect, it is about how imagination operates via abstracting and symbolizing perception. In our work, we address why it is reasonable to depict representations of ideal places as symbolic spaces in a degree of abstraction that is far from photorealism, and to instead find other forms of representation. Furthermore, we explore how to avoid the uncanny valley that inevitably arises in virtual aesthetics when something is not quite right, and finally, how a readable yet intuitive formal language can be implemented. 

  • 3.
    johansson, michael
    et al.
    K3.
    Linde, Per
    K3.
    Fieldasy2004In: Fieldasy, Sheffield, UK, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fieldasy is a process for engaging multiple perspectives in the creation of a world, and the mapping of its virtual space. While the final outcome lies ahead, the process has already produced a series of artistic expressions that drives the overall project forward. Fieldasy refers to the methods of field working and invoking imagination by using physical objects. The objects constitute a shared ground for collaborative creativity, serves as nodes in a complex narrative and as a basis for the creation of the world. In the paper, we describe the process, methods and the artifacts developed in this project. We also show how this approach can host and facilitate artistic development in a complex production environment such as the one of digital media, supported by invited artists, researchers (computer science) and students (interaction design), enabling diverse parties to transfer their knowledge into the project in an ongoing manner. Three aspects of the project are discussed: The Framework; the city of Abadyl, The Method; fieldasy and The Output; a series of artifacts eventually displayed in a series of exhibitions.

  • 4.
    Malmström, Elisabet
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU).
    Aesthetic learning processes in identity work: love of the self and wanting to become2013In: The International Journal of Arts Education, ISSN 1728-175X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 33-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The process of learning to become and adequately respond to the complexities of the Self through handmade productions is unlikely to occur without guidance. The support of this article’s idea is the ‘language turn’ of education from the 70s. It also seems important that students learn about art-action in an image-based global culture, including how images are important forms of human expression and substance in becoming. Thus teachers need to know how they give instructions to stimulate thinking through students’ languages of arts (style). Educational sciences of today support this idea where a Peircean mode of education gives support to a wide concept of the text including semiotic resources other than the verbal language. Researchers thus proclaim a horizontal concept of the text for the same purpose of giving equal epistemological status to verbal and semiotic sign-action. For the purpose of stimulating humans’ becoming, I argue for a pragmatic semiotic perspective and that language and visual action do not only include the linguistic and the figurative picture but also the material used, a wide and horizontal view on communication to cooperation. The students show unique ways of art in action, including means to become unique. MyAesthetic Learning processes in identity work -Love of the self and wanting to become unique.My method to find out about mediation of different themes to connect sign -action and mind builds on a hermeneutic model of mediation made by the author; it is a semio-cognitive re-construction of the sign. The result shows features to the students’ different processes of orientation to sign-mindedness and style through which meanings are accessible to becoming. Another result is that the zone of proximal comm unication between students and students’ pictures/texture and teachers makes a difference to the student’s ultimate unique becoming. The result could be of great importance to school aesthetics in the future.

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