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  • 1.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Europeiska ljudlandskap – tur och retur: en betraktelse inifrån av ett soundscape-projekt2010In: Nutida musik, ISSN 1652-6082, no 1, p. 45-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Interaktiv musikkomposition2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation, titled Interactive Music Composition, is a practice based Ph.D. thesis in the field of Musicology. The purpose is to explore if and how one can compose computer based interactive music, that is musically satisfying for an interacting audience, consisting of both laymen and skilled musicians. The text describes the design and reflection in two interactive music installations: Do-Be-DJ, open-air installation in a public park, and, Mufi, with modular and moveable interface. Based on methods and per­spectives in Musicology and Interaction Design, a composition model for interactive music is developed. The model investigates the experience di­mensions listen, explore, compose and collaborate. It also investigates the design dimensions of interaction, narrative structure, composition rule and sound node. The conceptual approach is to apply improvisation and composition methods from jazz, pop and groove based music on interactive music. It also uses the concepts of openess in musical structures and interpretation, musical mediation of actions and meaning and everyday use of music, when composing interactive music. The dissertation contributes to an understanding of how to create composition techniques for interactive music, such as: Direct, varied and shifting response. It reflects on the change in meaning of the musicological terms composition, improvisation, musical work, listener, musician and audience. And on the interaction design terms interaction, gameplay, system and user. The term co-creator is used to describe an actively, interacting and collaborating person, to complement traditional terms like audience, performer and user.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Malmö högskola.
    "Shoot ’em up -musik": om musikaliska strukturer för interaktivt berättande i tevespelet Rez2003In: NM/T Nutida Musik/Tritonus, ISSN 0029-6597, no 2, p. 26-30Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det musikdramatiska berättandet har idag lierat sig med nya medier och teknologier. Resultatet av detta är att gränsen mellan lyssnaren och den aktive kompositören håller på att luckras upp. I musiken till datorspelen finner vi ett musikdramatiskt berättande som genom interaktiviteten frångår det traditionella berättandets linjära narratologi. Att komponera musik som både är intressant och samtidigt flexibelt rättar sig efter en publik som fysiskt medverkar till att skapa musiken är kanske vår tids största utmaning för nu verksamma musiker, tonsättare och dramatiker.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Designing empowering vocal and tangible interaction: 2013In: The International conference on new interfaces for musical expression / [ed] Kyogu Lee, Kaejeon, Korea: Seoul National University , 2013, p. 406-412Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our voice and body are important parts of our self-experience, and our communication and relational possibilities. They gradually become more important for Interaction Design due to increased development of tangible interaction and mobile communication. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our ongoing research project RHYME. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible media. We build on the use of voice in Music Therapy and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible interactive media that through use reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross-media techniques to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate voice-body connections, positive emotions and structures for actions.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Musical interaction for health improvement2014In: Oxford handbook of interactive audio / [ed] Karen Collins, Bill Kapralos, Holly Tessler, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2014, p. 247-262Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past decade, tangible sensor technologies have matured and become less expensive and easier to use, leading to an explosion of innovative musical designs within video games, smartphone applications, and interactive art installations. Interactive audio has become an important design quality in commercially successful games like Guitar Hero , and a range of mobile phone applications motivating people to interact, play, dance, and collaborate with music. Parallel to the game, phone, and art scenes, an area of music and health research has grown, showing the positive results of using music to promote health and wellbeing in everyday situations and for a broad range of people, from children and elderly to people with psychological and physiological disabilities. Both quantitative medical and ecological humanistic research show that interaction with music can improve health, through music’s ability to evoke feelings, motivate people to interact, master, and cope with difficult situations, create social relations and experience shared meaning. Only recently, however, the music and health field has started to take interest in interactive audio, based on computer-mediated technologies’ potential for health improvement. Here, we show the potential of using interactive audio in what we call interactive musicking in the computer-based interactive environment Wave. Interactive musicking is based on musicologist Christopher Small’s concept “musicking”, meaning any form of relation-building that occurs between people, and people and things, related to activities that include music. For instance, musicking includes dancing, listening, and playing with music (in professional contexts and in amateur, everyday contexts). We have adapted the concept of "musicking" on the design of computer-based musical devices. The context for this chapter is the research project RHYME. RHYME is a multidisciplinary collaboration between the Centre for Music and Health at the Norwegian Academy of Music, the Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO), and Informatics at the University of Oslo. Our target group is families with children with severe disabilities. Our goal is to improve health and wellbeing in the families through everyday musicking activities in interactive environments. Our research approach is to use knowledge from music and health research, musical composition and improvisation, musical action research, musicology, music sociology, and soundscape studies, when designing the tangible interactive environments. Our focus here is interaction design and composition strategies, following research-by-design methodology, creating interactive musicking environments. We describe the research and design of the interactive musicking environment Wave, based on video documentation, during a sequence of actions. Our findings suggest some interactive audio design strategies to improve health. We base the design strategies on musical actions performed while playing an instrument, such as impulsive or iterative hitting, or sustainable stroking of an instrument. Musical actions like these can also be used for musicking in everyday contexts, creating direct sound responses to evoke feelings that create expectations and confirm interactions. In opposition to a more control-oriented, instrument and interface perspective, we argue that musical variation and narrative models can be used to design interactive audio, where the audio is seen as an actor taking many different roles, as instrument, co-musician, toy, etc. In this way, the audio and the interactive musicking environments will change over time, answering with direct response, as well as nose-thumbing and changing response, motivating creation, play, and social interaction. Musical variation can also be used to design musical backgrounds and soundscapes that can be used for creating layers of ambience. These models create a safe environment and contribute to shared meaning.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Institute of Design, The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    Institute of Design, The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Vocal and tangible interaction crossing borders2013In: Include Asia 2013 Proceedings: global challenges and local solutions in inclusive design, Conference on inclusive design / [ed] Jeremy Myerson, London: Helen Hamlyn Centre of Design, The Royal College of Art in London, The Hong Kong Design Centre , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our voice and body are important parts of our self-expression and self-experience for all of us. They are also essential for our way to communicate and build relations cross borders such as abilities, ages, locations and backgrounds. Voice, body and tangibility gradually become more important for ICT, due to increased development of tangible interaction and mobile communication. The voice and tangible interaction therefore also become more important for the Universal Design field. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our ongoing research project RHYME. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible and sensorial media. We build on use of voice in Music Therapy, knowledge from multi-sensory stimulation and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible interactive media that are sensorially stimulating. Interactive media that through use reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for all the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross-media techniques, to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate voice-body connections, positive emotions and structures for actions.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Vocal and tangible interaction in RHYME2014In: Music, Health, Technology and Design / [ed] Stensæth, Karette, Oslo: Norwegian Academy of Music , 2014, p. 21-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our voice and body are important parts of our self-expression and self-experience for all of us. They are also essential for our way to communicate and build relations cross borders such as abilities, ages, locations and backgrounds. Voice, body and tangibility gradually become more important for Information and Communication Technology (ICT), due to increased development of tangible interaction and mobile communication. The voice and tangible interaction therefore also become more important for the fields of Assistive Technology, Health Technology and Universal Design. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our on-going research project RHYME. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible and sensorial media. We build on use of voice in Music Therapy, knowledge from multi-sensory stimulation and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible interactive media that are sensorially stimulating. Interactive media that through use, can reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for all the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross-media techniques, to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate voice-body connections, positive emotions and structures for actions.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Vocal and tangible technology for music and health2013In: Book of abstracts: setting the tone: cultures of relating and reflecting in music therapy / [ed] Gro Trondalen, Oslo: The Norwegian Academy of Music , 2013, p. 24-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our voice and body are important parts of our self-expression and self-experience. They are also essential for our way to communicate and build relations cross borders like abilities, ages, locations, backgrounds and cultures. Voice and tangibility gradually become more important when developing new music technology for the Music Therapy and the Music and Health fields, due to new technology possibilities that have recently arisen. For example smartphones, computer games and networked, social media services like Skype. In this paper we present and discuss our work with voice and tangible interaction in our ongoing research project. The goal is to improve health for families, adults and children with severe disabilities through use of collaborative, musical, tangible sensorial media. We build on use of voice in Music Therapy and studies by Lisa Sokolov, Diane Austin, Kenneth Bruscia and Joanne Loewy. Further we build on knowledge from Multi-sensory stimulation and on a humanistic health approach. Our challenge is to design vocal and tangible, sensorially stimulating interactive media, that through use reduce isolation and passivity and increase empowerment for all the users. We use sound recognition, generative sound synthesis, vibrations and cross- media techniques, to create rhythms, melodies and harmonic chords to stimulate body- voice connections, positive emotions and structures for actions. The reflections in this paper build on action research methods, video observations and research-by-design methods. We reflect on observations of families and close others with children with severe disabilities, interacting in three vocal and tangible installations.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Forskningsplattformen Hälsa i samverkan.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    Oslo School of Architecture & Design.
    Olofsson, Fredrik
    Designing sound for recreation and well-being2014In: Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME 2014) / [ed] Baptiste Caramiaux, Koray Tahiroğlu, Rebecca Fiebrink, Atau Tanaka, 2014, p. 529-532Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore how we compose sound for an interactive tangible and mobile interface, where the goal is to improve health and well-being for families with children with disabilities. We describe the composition process of how we decompose a linear beat-based and vocal sound material and recompose it with real-time audio synthesis and composition rules into interactive Scenes. Scenes that make it possible for the users to select, explore and recreate different sound worlds. In order to recreate, the users interact with the tangible interface in different ways, as instrument, play with it as a friend, improvise and create music and relax with it as ambient sounding furniture. We discuss composition techniques for mixing sound, tangible-physical and lighting elements in the Scenes. Based on observations we explore how a diverse audience in the family and at school can recreate and improvise their own sound experience and play together in open and non-therapeutic everyday situations. We conclude by discussing the possible impact of our findings for the NIME-community; how the techniques of decomposing, recomposing and recreating sound, based on a relational perspective, could contribute to the design of new instruments for musical expression.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Cappellen, Birgitta
    The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Same but different: composing for interactivity2008In: Audio Mostly Conference: A Conference on Interaction with Sound, October 22-23 2011, Luleå University, Interactive Institute, Sonic, 2008, p. 80-85Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on experiences from practical design work, we try to show, what we believe, are the similarities and differences, between composing music for interactive media compared to linear music. In our view, much is the same, built on traditions that have been around for centuries within music and composition. The fact that the composer writes programming code is an essential difference. Instead of writing one linear work, he creates infinite numbers of potential musics that reveal themselves as answers to user interactions in many situations. Therefore, we have to broaden our perspectives. We have to put forward factors that earlier was implicit in the musical and music making situations, no matter if it was the concert hall, the church, or the club. When composing interactive music we have to consider the genre, the potential roles the listener might take, and the user experience in different situations.

  • 11.
    Boström Andersson, Jesper
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business.
    Nygren, Jonas
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business.
    Security Theater i digitala applikationer: En illusion för att förstärka känslan av säkerhet2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Computer power and speed have increased exponentially in recent years, but our expectations and mental models of what computer systems are capable of have not kept up. In cases where people do not believe that the system can perform the requested task as quickly as they do, an artificial wait can be applied to closer match the reality. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether security theater works in the context of banking applications and what happens with the users trust if the illusion of security fails. Through this paper we have found that security theater is a phenomenon that works and adds value to the user. However, the context in question must be carefully evaluated, as security theater in the wrong context can be seen as a disturbing element. We came to the conclusion that the majority of our test subjects are not negatively affected, and instead sees the value in security theater even after the illusion have been revealed.

  • 12.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Co-created staging: situating installations2011In: Interactive Media Arts Conference, IMAC2011, Re-new digital arts festival / [ed] Ass. Prof. Morten Søndergaard, ArT / Aalborg University, Copenhagen, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Staging is the creative act of showing something to an audience.When staging, the artist choose and create the context, situationand structure of the presented object, play or installation. The chosen context and situation provide background for the audience interpretations. Meaning is co-created between the artist and audience, based on the cultural and individual understanding of the context and situation. The term installation is open, ambiguous and undefined. One does not completely know what to expect and where to find an installation. It is open towards many interpretations. In this paper we present how we worked with staging of two interactive installations in different exhibition situations, to provoke and motivate different interpretations, expectations and interactions. We argue for staging as a communicative strategy to attract and motivate diverse audiences and user groups to collaborate and co-create through interpretation and interaction. Further we argue that installations have to be open to many possible structures, interpretations, interaction forms and roles the user can take, and shift betweendynamically. When the user dynamically restructure, shift rolesand thereby re-situate the installation, the user is a co-creator in the staging act. We call this dynamic staging.

  • 13.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Design for co-creation with interactive montage2011In: Proceedings, 4th Nordic Design Research Conference, Nordes2011, School of Art and Design, Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland
May 29th - June 1st, 2011: Making Design Matter / [ed] Jung-Joo Lee, School of Art and Design, Aalto University, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Montage in cinema means to mount images andsounds from different sources, that are interpreted together and whose oppositions drive the storyfurther. In this paper we develop the montage concept further for co-creation in interactive, tactile, spatial cross-media. As case we use the design of the interactive, tangible, cross-media installation ORFI. ORFI is developed to facilitate collaboration and co-creation between children with severe disabilities and their care persons. In this paper we focus on how we have designed for interactive montage. We present two main types of interactive montage, close and shifted in three dimensions (spatial, temporal and actorial). With the first we mean spatial and temporal closeness, depending on the roles users take and the interpretations they make. With shifted we mean how to use spatial and temporal shifting and distance between the media elements in space and over time, depending on the users’ roles and interpretations. All this to encourage co-creation over time, between a variety of users in different situations.

  • 14.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap II. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Designing four generations of 'Musicking Tangibles'2014In: Music, Health, Technology and Design / [ed] Stensæth, Karette, Oslo: Norwegian Academy of Music , 2014, p. 1-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n this article we present a novel approach for the understanding and the design of interactive health improving music technology, what we call Musicking Tangibles. The Musicking Tangibles approach represents an alternative approach to the traditional instrument, interface and switch-oriented music technology perspective. Our approach combines a humanistic, resource and empowerment oriented health approach with an aesthetic and culture based design approach towards music technology. We present four empowering and health improving qualities for the Musicking Tangibles. These qualities emphasize to: 1) Continually evoke interest and positive emotions relevant to diverse users’ interpretation of the tangibles and the situation; 2) Dynamically offer the users many roles to take, many musicking actions to make and many ways to express themselves; 3) Offer the users aesthetically consistent responses and build relevant cross-media expectations and challenges over time and space, consistent with their character; 4) Offer the users many relations to make: to people, things, experiences, events and places. Further we present and argue for some design solutions of the Musicking Tangibles ORFI, WAVE, REFLECT, and the POLLY World from the RHYME-project. In developing POLLY we have tried to put together as many design qualities as possible, to exemplify our view and current understanding.

  • 15.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Expanding the role of the instrument2011In: Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, 30 May - 1 June 2011, Oslo, Norway / [ed] Alexander Refsum Jensenius, Rolf Inge Godøy, Oslo University, Oslo, 2011, p. 511-514Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional role of the musical instrument is to be the working tool of the professional musician. On the instrument the musician performs music for the audience to listen to. In this paper we present an interactive installation, where we expand the role of the instrument to motivate musicking and co-creation between diverse users. We have made an open installation, where users can perform a variety of actions in several situations. By using the abilities of the computer, we have made an installation which can be interpreted to have many roles. It can both be an instrument, a co-musician, a communication partner, a toy, a meeting place and an ambient musical landscape. The users can dynamically shift between roles, based on their abilities, knowledge and motivation.

     

  • 16.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Malmö högskola.
    From designing objects to designing fields: from control to freedom2003In: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 74-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we want to explore Field as a concept and as a metaphor for understanding interactive systems. By interactive systems we mean both systems and artworks, where the user by interacting changes the course of events. We intend to show why we need new terms and why we consider Field to be a fruitful concept and term. Further we will show how the Field concept changes both our understanding of what we do as designers and composers and how we acknowledge our audience. We will exemplify the design consequences of the Field concept by going through some design considerations we made when designing the audio tactile installation Mufi.

  • 17.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Institute of Design, The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    The empowering potential of re-staging2012In: Leonardo Electronic Almanac, ISSN 1071-4391, E-ISSN 1071-4391, ISSN 1071-4391, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 132-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present and discuss the empowering potential of restaging interactive art installations. We build on an approach, where wedivide the staging process into four levels of staging (potential, strategic,tactical, dynamic), and in Umberto Eco’s sense open, to four categories ofchoices (genre, temporal, spatial, actorial) to perform on each staging level. We present and discuss how we staged one of our interactive installations at a museum of modern art and a rehabilitation centre for people with severe disabilities. We discuss our staging experience in relation to empowering qualities like; possibilities for self-expression, vitalization, ability to act, co-create, participation and mutual relation building. Our experience was that re-staging art at a radically different place became a provocation that re-vitalized us as creative individuals.

  • 18.
    Cappelen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Institute of Design, The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Andersson, Anders-Petter
    Institute of Design, The Oslo School of Architecture and Design.
    Towards an empowering tangible interaction design for diversity2013In: Include Asia 2013 Proceedings: global challenges and local solutions in inclusive design, Conference on inclusive design / [ed] Jeremy Myerson, London: The Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design, The ROyal College of Art in London, Hong Kong Desing Centre , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The seven principles of Universal Design, such as ”4. Perceptible Information” and ”5. Tolerance for errors”, are formulated from the design’s or system’s perspective. The principles focus on the qualities of the system or design, not on the value of use, the long time experience and use by many different people. Nor do the principles embrace a cultural and social understanding of the value of things, designs and situations. In this paper we argue for the necessity to broaden this narrow system or product design perspective, when designing to empower diverse users. Our field of study is musical and cross-media Tangible Interaction Design, where multimedia computer capabilities are included in everyday objects. Our goal is to motivate social and musical co-creation for families with disabled children to improve their health and quality of life. To extend our design thinking, practice and understanding of a design’s value, meaning and empowering potential, we build on a humanistic health approach, resource-oriented thinking, Positive psychology and Empowerment philosophy. In the paper we present and discuss how we design cross-media, interactive, tangible and musical things to motivate and empower a variety of users in our on-going RHYME project.

  • 19.
    Carlsson, Maria
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Bergström, Rebecca
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Musik med yngre barn: en intervjustudie om åtta pedagogers förhållningssätt till musik med barn i åldern ett till åtta år.2014Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Uppsatsens syfte är att få en förståelse för hur pedagoger arbetar med musik tillsammans med barn i åldern ett till åtta år. Resultatet erhölls genom kvalitativa intervjuer med åtta pedagoger. Undersökningen visade att pedagogerna tycker det är viktigt att använda musik tillsammans med yngre barn, men hur musik används i verksamheten varierade. Av resultatet framgick också att pedagogerna anser att musik är en artefakt i barns språkliga respektive motoriska utveckling. Litteratur som tagits fram för uppsatsen stärker pedagogernas svar. Den teoretiska ansatsen som valts för arbetet är det sociokulturella perspektivet och det pragmatiska synsättet. Detta för att musik är socialt och kan utövas med hjälp av praktiska aktiviteter.

  • 20.
    Freij, Maria
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    A natural occurrence2014In: Southerly, ISSN 0038-3732, ISSN 0038-3732, Vol. 74, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Freij, Maria
    I Was Here2021Book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Freij, Maria
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Kattfot och blå viol2014In: Two thirds north, ISSN 2001-8452, p. 10-12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Freij, Maria
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för humaniora.
    Kattfot och blå viol2019In: The Bruce Dawe National Poetry Prize Anthology 2019, University of Queensland Press, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Freij, Maria
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för humaniora.
    Lewis2017In: Two Thirds North, ISSN 2001-8452Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Freij, Maria
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Long way down2014In: Two thirds north, ISSN 2001-8452, p. 46-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Hedström, Marita
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Avdelningen för design.
    Åkerlund, Linda
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Avdelningen för design.
    Att skapa användarupplevelser genom digitalisering med AI: en studie av faktorer för interaktion som påverkar användarupplevelser vid digitalisering med AI hos BUP2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

     I den här studien har vi undersökt vilka faktorer för interaktion som påverkar användarupplevelser vid digitalisering med AI (Artificiell Intelligens). Det vår analys och slutsats pekar på är faktorer som: otydlighet, inkonsekvens i interaktioner, brist på feedback och information men även personliga samtal och väntetider. Våra empiriska undersökningar visar på att dessa faktorer påverkar upplevelserna på olika sätt, både negativt och positivt. Genom att beakta dessa faktorer samt även möjligheterna som digitalisering med AI ger, kan detta bidra till att skapa önskvärda användarupplevelser. Våra studier har resulterat i ett designförslag där vi föreslår att AI används för rutinuppgifter, bedömningar och för att stödja dokumentation.

    Studien är relevant i och med att vi har identifierat att det finns luckor i tidigare forskning om just kopplingen mellan användarupplevelse, digitalisering och AI.

    Vi har använt kvalitativa metoder för de empiriska undersökningarna: observation och intervjuer. Vi har även genomfört en workshop för att undersöka det designförslag vi kommit fram till.

    Vi vill peka på att resultatet av våra undersökningar är relevant för de digitaliseringsprojekt som pågår idag, men vi ser även att det krävs vidare studier i form av att en utveckling av den föreslagna lösningen genomförs och testas, samt att man undersöker användarupplevelse vid digitalisering med AI vidare med flera fall.

  • 27.
    Holmberg, Hans
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Då spelades det teater!1981In: Klippt ur Kristianstadsbladet: 125 år / [ed] Hjelmstedt, Lennart, Melén, Erik, Kristianstad: Kristianstadsbladet , 1981, p. 206-212Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Holmberg, Hans
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Från Kristianstads gamla teater I: det första spelåret på Kristianstad teater1981In: Kring Helge å: årsskrift för Föreningen Gamla Christianstad, S:a Annas gille, Villands härads hembygdsförening, ISSN 0280-3895, Vol. 1980-1981, p. 67-72Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Holmberg, Hans
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Från Kristianstads gamla teater II: Ibsen i Kristianstad1981In: Kring Helge å: årsskrift för Föreningen Gamla Christianstad, S:a Annas gille, Villands härads hembygdsförening, ISSN 0280-3895, Vol. 1980-1981, p. 78-85Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Holmberg, Hans
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Från Kristianstads gamla teater III: Shakespeare på Kristianstads gamla teater1981In: Kring Helge å: årsskrift för Föreningen Gamla Christianstad, S:a Annas gille, Villands härads hembygdsförening, ISSN 0280-3895, Vol. 1980-1981, p. 73-77Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Holmberg, Hans
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Något om teaterlivet i Kristianstad under åren 1835-18371978In: Kring Helge å: årsskrift för Föreningen Gamla Christianstad, S:a Annas gille, Villands härads hembygdsförening, ISSN 0280-3895, Vol. 1977-1978, p. 63-78Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Holmberg, Hans
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Om danska teatergrupper i Ystad under 1800-talet1981In: Ystadiana, ISSN 1653-3658, Vol. 26, p. 67-72Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Holmberg, Hans
    Kristianstad University College, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Två märkliga laveringar i Ystads teater: vad bilderna berättar1981In: Ystadiana, ISSN 1653-3658, Vol. 26, p. 73-77Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Bring the noise2013In: International Journal of Art, Culture and Design Technologies, ISSN 2155-4196, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 26-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article the author will present how they developed different processes for collectively producing a seriesexplorative soundscapes and mechanical artefacts using specific constraints influenced by theories from artand architecture. The author will show how they worked with a design methodology that brought togetheran editor and the final expression of the artwork into one surface of interaction and execution using a virtualcityscape as an iterative ground for sound and music explorations, and give some examples of the differentprototypes and iterations. The author will also discuss how they tweaked/iterated with the parameters of the framework, the sounds and the final visual expression to match their artistic intention, and finally to bringsome noise into Abadyl. Also influencing the overall framework.

  • 35.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Ideal spaces exhibition2017In: ArtsIt2017, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Through the years we have worked with  the idea of gestalt through artefact creation (including virtual objects and 3D-worlds) as one surface to explore, exploit, test and communicate our ideas and concepts, that are generative rather than produced, where we try  to grasp systematic insights through complex generated realities, in which an audience later is invited to interact.  In our Ideal spaces exhibition for the 2016 Biennale in Venice, we tried to explore this via a combination of presenting ideal city spaces, active participation of the visitors molding their own spaces, and symbolic representation. Ideal Spaces is also a high-tech project that uses diverse technologies in new ways, also new techniques and programming developed by us. In this paper, we show the theoretical and cultural background, and some lessons learned, regarding on what level of abstraction a visitor could interact with our exhibition to better understand how visitors created their own ideal spaces.

  • 36.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Soundscaping2018In: Enhancing art, culture, and design with technological integration / [ed] Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, Hershey, Pennsylvania 17033-1240, USA: IGI Global , 2018, p. 169-182Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, the author presents how he developed different processes for collectively producing a series explorative soundscapes through interface creation and mechanical artifacts using specific constraints influenced by theories of art, design, and architecture. He shows how he worked with a design methodology that brought together an editor and the final expression of the artwork into one surface of interaction and execution using a virtual cityscape as an iterative ground for sound and music explorations, and gives some examples of different prototypes and iterations. The author also discusses how he tweaked/iterated with the parameters of the framework, the sounds, and the final visual expression to match his artistic intention, and finally to bring some noise.

  • 37.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    The people´s smart sculpture PS22016In: ISEA 2016: Journey to Abadyl / [ed] Martin Koplin, 2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The People’s Smart Sculpture (PS2) panel discusses future oriented approaches in smart media-art, developed, designed and exploited for artistic and public participation in the change and re-design of our living environment. The actual debate about a smart future is not taking into account any idea of media art as an instrument for to realize the social sculpture, mentioned by Beuys[1] or as social sculpture itself.

    The People’s Smart Sculpture is the only large scale Creative Europe media-art project (2014-2018) in this context. It fosters participative-art and collaborative media-art-processes. The artistic results and the open approaches of the project will be discussed by 5 panelists from 5 countries. The project itself is constituted by 12 project-partners in 8 European countries with more than 350 artists and creatives from 29 countries worlwide. The approach works on two levels: the implementation of cultural participation-projects by media-artists and the ongoing optimization of the art and participation aspects. PS2 integrates diverse groups of people to participate in the non-institutional set up of structures for the people´s re-design of their urban, societal and living environment. Artists, citizens, creatives with a new user's perception and new skills are able to „medialize“ the Cultural R>evolution of art, culture, society and science: into spaces of a new public.

  • 38.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Wanderlost2014In: Cyberworlds (CW), 2014 International Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I will discuss a art and design project called wander lost, were we through co-creation try to populate a virtual world with people, objects and architecture. In this project we have developed a method for gathering input and inspiration for early stages in the design process designing virtual worlds. I will through some example of work show how worlds, real and virtual are as much made as found, and how they can be used to challenged each other into new forms of experiences and expressions, of both physical and virtual spaces. Where the virtual space transformed into maps & instructions can challenge the physical with qualities that is very hard to achieve in the physical world itself, and in that conflict new insights and expressions can revealed. Today Hybrid creations have become a method for working with cultural production not only with different elements of form, but as blending identities of the creators as well, wander lost support that process. We show how we from the virtual settings of the city of Traora we have extracted a series of walks as instructions and invited different co-creators to explore these algorithmical walks in their everyday surrounding in order to be surprised by rediscovery, using a digital camera/smart phone to capture and later communicate their findings. Allowing the unfamiliar to co-exist with the comfortably familiar. To create a process where digital worlds challenge and inspire digital expressions, tools and models with physical play and exploration. Supporting our long-term aim with research in new media is to set up design methods that can be used in a creative and collaborative process. We show how these findings played a crucial role designing the virtual city Traora. The Traora Flaneur kit turns everyday walks into discoveries of both urban contexts as well as ideas for possible virtual worlds.

  • 39.
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Wanderlost2015In: Analyzing art, culture, and design in the digital age / [ed] Gianluca Mura, Hershey, Pensylvania: IGI Global, 2015, p. 71-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter I will discuss a art and design project called wanderlost, were we through co-creation try to populate a virtual world with people, objects and architecture. In this project stages we have developed a method for gathering input and inspiration for early stages in the design process designing virtual worlds. I will through some example of work show how worlds, real and virtual are as much made as found, and how they can be used to challenged each other into new forms of experiences and expressions, of both physical and virtual spaces. Where the virtual space transformed into maps & instructions can challenge the physical with qualities that is very hard to achieve in the physical world itself, and in that conflict new insights and expressions can revealed. Today Hybrid creations have become a method for working with cultural production not only with different elements of form, but as blending identities of the creators as well, wanderlost support that process. We show how we from the virtual settings of the city of Traora we have extracted a series of walks as instructions and invited different co-creators to explore these algorithmical walks in their everyday surrounding in order to be surprised by rediscovery, using a digital camera/smartphone to capture and later communicate their findings. Allowing the unfamiliar to co-exist with the comfortably familiar. To create a process where digital worlds challenge and inspire digital expressions, tools and models with physical play and exploration. Supporting our long-term aim with research in new media is to set up design methods that can be used in a creative and collaborative process. We show how these findings played a crucial role designing the virtual city Traora. The wanderlost method turns everyday walks into discoveries of both urban contexts as well as ideas for possible virtual worlds.

  • 40.
    Johansson, Michael
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Gehmann, Ulrich
    Tyskland.
    Ideal spaces: digital-cultural ecology and the medium-sized city2016In: Digital-cultural ecology and the medium-sized city / [ed] S. Sparke & G. Cairns, 2016, p. 5-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our working group Ideal Spaces we are concerned with mediated worlds: especially the one of ideal worlds reconstructed, mainly concentrating on a classical topic of a “mediated” city through history, namely that of a utopian ideal city. How these utopian places have to be conceived as being ‘ideal’ ones. How this has been mediated, in terms of their modes of presentation, but also in those of the ideas underlying them as regards the different audiences that were thought to be addressed by them?

    These historical conceptions of what an ‘ideal world’ should, or could be is a classical topic of our cultural sphere, and focuses upon one perspective of relevance, that of an ideal city. The latest since the onset of what has been called ‘modernity’, now providing the actual background of the actually built cities we all live in, as our environment of relevance.

    Such conceptions of ‘ideal’ relevant worlds can be compared, as a background folio, with the approaches towards an ‘ideal’ environment as they become evident in the concept of The City of Abadyl. That in itself is a proposed city, a fantasy, a set of codes and models, a library of artefacts and prototypes, and foremost, it is its co-creators. Since its inception in 1999 it has grown into a large database of materials interlinked through the shape of a city, regardless of their respective incompatibilities. Support and create a geatlt for inquary

    Our approach is to create an environment which facilitates artistic work practice in complex production environments such as those of digital media, supporting invited artists, researchers, companies, and students. We establish a ready-made, fictitious gravity that others can easily transfer their knowledge into. So How do we go about exploring this complex digital space? We could let people walk the streets of Abadyl in for example a game engine, but we have so far chosen to go in another direction. We have used the framework of Abadyl to stage different events in the form of written scenarios that provide detailed and specific background material. Our scenarios try to bring aspects of field study and fantasy together, to slowly create a discrete dynamic tension or displacement between persons, objects, time, places, and events that are not usually, if ever, associated into new and surprising conjunctions. Through this work we have developed several methods of worldmaking. The aspect of imagery is of particular importance here since comparisons can be made between traditional conceptions of pre-planned ideal worlds – e.g., the ideal of a functionalist city, of a typically ‘modern’ one, etc. – and imageries that evolve de novo and unplanned, as it is tried in the case of Abadyl.

    Moreover, such comparisons inform about a further aspect of imagery and hence, of being mediated. We have to take the notion of the ideal in both its connotations as a mental or inner image on the one hand (from the Greek eidos, or idea); and on the other, as a perfect state to be achieved and longed for (the ideal in its common terms of understanding). If we do so, then it becomes evident that even seemingly ‘new’ and ‘spontaneous’ outcomes like those in Abadyl are informed by mental or ‘inner’ images deeply rooted in what is called a cultural memory, that is, rest on a culture-specific substratum. And it is very interesting to see how these both layers of imagery, the “new” and the “old” one, are influencing each other in mutual terms. Which is a very important topic of mediated cities today since the assumption is that what is happening in Abadyl is also happening here.

  • 41.
    Johansson, Michael
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Gehmann, Ulrich
    Tyskland.
    Reiche, Martin
    Tyskland.
    Gestalt2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many disciplines have the culture and nurturing to explore, create, and tell stories about worlds. Therefore, our contribution is about the re-discovery of an idea that has been crucial in occidental thinking and which became underestimated: the notion of gestalt. To conceive real-world (and other) phenomena in terms of gestalt helps to gain a holistic understanding of them, and the aim of our paper therefore is to promote a method to rediscover the world in a less analytical fashion than it has been done in the last 400 years, after an analytical-based perception of reality gained ground with the scientific method developed in the 17th century and later. At the same time, a gestalt-approach helps to reframe (and better understand) recent technological developments as outcomes of an analytical way of thinking. Because analysis and the shaping of processes and entities according to functionalities is not the only or most suitable way to generate understanding, despite we got used to such a general state of mind.

    To conceive the world primarily in analytical terms or as a set of functions became culturally accepted. A gestalt-approach can be a promising complement to the prevalent analytical approaches, and the general benefit of such an approach lies in the use of comparative methods to create knowledge or design processes. Also borrowing ideas from Design Theory where Gestalt is analogous to a design process, we can view it as a process of knowledge acquisition and learning from the previously unknown.

    Gestalt perception as well as -conception helps to develop another kind of epistemology than the prevalent analytical/functional one, as for instance cybernetics, system theories and bioengineering already demonstrated. It transcends the border between real and virtual towards envisioning a complete reality, and out of that proves to be a method of working with unknown phenomena.

  • 42.
    Johansson, Michael
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Åberg, Kristoffer
    Against the self-evident2014In: Real virtuality: about deconstruction and multiplication of world / [ed] Ulrich Gehmann, Martin Rieche, Berlin: Transcript Verlag, 2014, p. 419-441Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Spelares upplevelser i datorspel: grafikkvalitet kontra spelatmosfär2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett område inom digital design som börjat få mer uppmärksamhet är upplevelsedesign. Godanvändbar design är viktigt men människor har ett växande behov av att bli underhållna ochengagerade genom digitala medier. Det har blivit mer relevant på senare tid då datatekniskaprodukter och tjänster blir allt vanligare i samhället. Framförallt är det i hem- och fritidsmiljöersom det blivit vanligare. En naturlig följd av utvecklingen är att datorspelsbranschen växer. Den ärnu i samma storlek som filmindustrin och det har blivit lika vanligt att spela datorspel som att tittapå teve. Forskning om datorspel och spelupplevelse är därför intressant i närliggandeämnesområden såsom upplevelsedesign och interaktionsdesign. Det kan bland annat tillföra utökadkunskap om att på bättre sätt skapa engagemang och motivera handling.Något intressant med datorspel är fokuset på allt högre grafikkvalitet. Vi kommer kanske inom ensnart framtid ha mycket svårt att skilja mellan grafik och verklighet. Frågan är hur denna utvecklingska betraktas? En del menar att det är negativt eftersom att andra spelelement får mindre fokus ochprioritet. Ett sådant spelelement är spelatmosfär. Spelatmosfär är ett spelelement som på senare tidblivit allt mer universell och neutral för att passa en bredare spelardemografi.För att bedöma utvecklingen i datorspelsbranschen undersöktes hur spelupplevelsen påverkas avgrafikkvalitet och spelatmosfär. Resultaten tyder på att utvecklingen i datorspelsbranschen kanbedömas som förnuftig och logisk. Samtidigt tyder resultaten på att det finns alternativa vägar föratt skapa lika god spelupplevelse. Ett av dessa alternativ illustreras i slutet av arbetet i form av ett designförslag.

  • 44.
    Koplin, M.
    et al.
    Tyskland.
    Vistica, O.
    Kroatien..
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Nedelkovski, I.
    Makedonien.
    Salo, K.
    Finland.
    Eirund, H.
    Tyskland.
    Schrank, C.
    Tyskland.
    Blau, L.
    Tyskland.
    SOCIAL ART IN EUROPEAN SPACES - AN APPROACH TO PARTICIPATION METHODOLOGIES WITHIN PS22016In: INTED 2016: 10TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, 2016, p. 1690-1699Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The People's Smart Sculpture PS2 - Social Art in European Spaces is a creative research and innovation project about the cultural evolution of the European city of the future. It addresses the growing complexity of life in today's city spaces and imminent challenges to the development of the urban environment. The People's Smart Sculpture PS2 explores the possibilities of participation that will become a smart culture technique as a result of the ongoing digitalization of society. 12 partners including universities, educational institutions, museums, galleries, theatres and research institutes in 8 European countries will organize 11 connected open labs integrating new art, design thinking, science, smart technologies and user culture for the participatory re-design of urbanity. The project has a budget of 2 million Euros and is funded by the European Commission within the Creative Europe programme for 3.5 years. 11 creative experiments in participatory art and design for the city of the future: The 12 project partners implement 11 experimental sub-projects and a European study about new forms of participation. While some PS2 sub-projects shed light on the ways we perceive our city space, or create speculative city environments, others will analyse problems, identify challenges and explore interdisciplinary solutions with citizens. The variety of approaches will reflect the diversity of people, skills, urban art, social processes and urban development. Renowned artists and designers from 29 countries will participate in the sub-projects. PS2 will explore and document new strategies for involving digital media and ICT in the development of user-centred culture. Development of new forms of participation for Smart Cities: Scientists from media-labs, computer science, cultural science, art history, sociology, architecture, design and urban planning will engage with the creative processes. Digital technologies will not only play an important role in the PS2 project art activities themselves, but directly support the innovation process by offering new opportunities for empowerment and societal integration of people of all social groups. The project will connect people and foster the exchange of ideas about and for smart cities. It is the base for cutting-edge communication between science and art, creatives, artists, media designers and citizens, and between the people and their governments. At the same time it will motivate the broad dissemination of new skills, design expertise and social knowledge relevant to urban re-design. Citizen participation in urban development and re-design has a long cultural tradition in Europe. But the rising complexity out of social issues, critical and creative ideas, green development, and at the same time a high level of demands towards a post-modernistic cultural evolution evoke the need of improved cooperation between all stakeholders in town: governmental entities, creative, and social cultural activists, experts and citizens. The participation processes needed for future activities in the field of urban-social sustainability requires an enhanced approach to citizen participation and user-friendly creative articulation. It is required to access the full potential of the new capabilities of communication, networking, social media, creativity, microcomputers, and new e-skills through the design of new participation methodologies. Art and media art prototype the next step concepts and methodologies for participation. This paper describes concepts and approaches of participation and reflects on participative art within examples of 6 PS2 sub-projects.

  • 45. Koplin, Martin
    et al.
    Siegert, Stephan
    Eirund, Helmut
    Ruzin, Irena
    Nedelkovski, Igor
    Johansson, Michael
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Avdelningen för design.
    Callesen, Jörgen
    Geiger, Christian
    Culén, Alma Leora
    Coughlin, Katie
    Wroblewska, Marta
    Salo, Kari
    Druzetic, Ivana
    The people's smart sculpture PS2: best practice study 2014-20182018Report (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Linge, Anna
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik.
    The meaning of music2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Linge, Anna
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik.
    Danielsson, Annika
    Örebro universitet.
    Westvall, Maria
    Örebro universitet.
    Musikens pedagogik eller musikpedagogik?2006In: Musikens pedagogik eller musikpedagogik?: teoretiska perspektiv på musikalisk mening, socialisation och musiksyn / [ed] Danielsson, Annika, Linge, Anna, Westvall, Maria, Örebro: Avdelningen för musikpedagogik och konstnärligt utvecklingsarbete, Musikhögskolan vid Örebro universitet , 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Lundén, Tomas
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Sundén, Karin
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Using the institutional repository as a platform for quality assessment of and open access to artistic works: A Project at the Faculty of Fine, Applied and Performing Arts, University of Gothenburg, Sweden2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the university world, the financial allocations for research are increasingly dependent on bibliometric indicators of faculty publications registered in databases and repositories. Following a decision by the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Gothenburg, the allocation of faculty research resources, should from the budget year 2012 partly be based on bibliometric indicators and partly on external funds. Each faculty has had to develop and formulate their bibliometric indicators in a way that best reflects their specific subject field and their publishing culture. The Faculty of Fine, Applied and Performing Arts has, beside traditional publications, also decided to focus on the unique excellence that characterizes its field, i.e. artistic works. We will show how it was made possible to use a bibliometric indicator also in assessing art works and how a workflow using the institutional repository as a platform was tried out in practice.

  • 49.
    Malmström, Elisabet
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU).
    Aesthetic learning processes in identity work: love of the self and wanting to become2013In: The International Journal of Arts Education, ISSN 1728-175X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 33-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The process of learning to become and adequately respond to the complexities of the Self through handmade productions is unlikely to occur without guidance. The support of this article’s idea is the ‘language turn’ of education from the 70s. It also seems important that students learn about art-action in an image-based global culture, including how images are important forms of human expression and substance in becoming. Thus teachers need to know how they give instructions to stimulate thinking through students’ languages of arts (style). Educational sciences of today support this idea where a Peircean mode of education gives support to a wide concept of the text including semiotic resources other than the verbal language. Researchers thus proclaim a horizontal concept of the text for the same purpose of giving equal epistemological status to verbal and semiotic sign-action. For the purpose of stimulating humans’ becoming, I argue for a pragmatic semiotic perspective and that language and visual action do not only include the linguistic and the figurative picture but also the material used, a wide and horizontal view on communication to cooperation. The students show unique ways of art in action, including means to become unique. MyAesthetic Learning processes in identity work -Love of the self and wanting to become unique.My method to find out about mediation of different themes to connect sign -action and mind builds on a hermeneutic model of mediation made by the author; it is a semio-cognitive re-construction of the sign. The result shows features to the students’ different processes of orientation to sign-mindedness and style through which meanings are accessible to becoming. Another result is that the zone of proximal comm unication between students and students’ pictures/texture and teachers makes a difference to the student’s ultimate unique becoming. The result could be of great importance to school aesthetics in the future.

  • 50.
    Mattisson, Jane
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    "I've done my own time": representing the human condition in the Great War: William Boyd's The New Confessions and The trench2010In: CineAction, ISSN 0826-9866, no 81, p. 39-46Article in journal (Refereed)
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