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Scale-down failed: dissimilarities between high-pressure-homogenizers of different scales due to failed mechanistic matching
Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Mat- och måltidsvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0002-661X
2017 (English)In: Journal of Food Engineering, ISSN 0260-8774, E-ISSN 1873-5770, Vol. 195, 31-39 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The high-pressure homogenizer (HPH) is used extensively in the processing of non-solid foods. Food researchers and producers use HPHs of different scales, from laboratory-scale (∼10 L/h) to the largest production-scale machines (∼50 000 L/h). Hence, the process design and interpretation of academic findings regarding industrial condition requires an understanding of differences between scales. This contribution uses theoretical calculations to compare the hydrodynamics of the different scales and interpret differences in the mechanism of drop-breakup.

Results indicate substantial differences between HPHs of different scales. The laboratory-scale HPH operates in the laminar regime whereas the production-scale is in the fully turbulent regime. The smaller scale machines are also less prone to cavitation and differ in their pressure profiles. This suggest that the HPHs of different scales should be seen as principally different emulsification processes. Conclusions on the effect or functionality of a HPH can therefore not readily be translate between scales.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 195, 31-39 p.
Keyword [en]
High-pressure homogenization;Scale-up; Emulsification; Fluid dynamics; Fragmentation
National Category
Other Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-16114DOI: 10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2016.09.019ISI: 000389111100004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-16114DiVA: diva2:992191
Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-05-08Bibliographically approved

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Håkansson, Andreas
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Avdelningen för Mat- och måltidsvetenskapResearch Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL)
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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