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Walking difficulties is the strongest contributing factor to fear of falling among people with mild Parkinson’s disease
Lund University.
Lund University.
Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2174-372X
Lund University.
2013 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Objective: Fear of falling is common among people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and may cause activity limitations and restrictions in participation. The aim of this study was to investigate contributing factors to fall-related self-efficacy in a clinical sample of people with PD.

Methods: The study included 104 people with PD that visited a neurological clinic during 2006-2011. Those >80 years of age, requiring support in standing or that did not understand the instructions were excluded. Mean (SD) age and PD-duration were 68 (9.4) and 5 (4.2) years, respectively; the mean (SD) “on” phase UPDRS III score was 14.5 (8.1). Fall-related self-efficacy (the dependent variable) was investigated with the Swedish version of the Falls Efficacy Scale, i.e. FES(S). Multiple linear regression analysis included independent variables targeting walking difficulties in daily life, freezing of gait, dyskinesia, fatigue, need of help in daily activities, age, PD-duration, history of falls/near falls, and pain.

Results: The median FES(S) score was 117 (q1-q3, 70129; minmax, 11130). Three significant independent variables were identified explaining 66% of the variance in FES(S) scores. The strongest contributing factor to fall-related self-efficacy was walking difficulties (explaining 60%), followed by fatigue and need for help in daily activities. These observations suggest that walking difficulties in daily life is the strongest contributing factor to fall-related selfefficacy in a mildly affected PD-sample. Targeting walking difficulties may help reduce fear of falling among people with PD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2013. Vol. 3, 150- p.
Series
Journal of Parkinson's Disease, ISSN 1877-7171 ; Suppl 1
National Category
Health Sciences Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-14585OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-14585DiVA: diva2:854557
Conference
The 3rd World Parkinson Congress, Montreal, Canada
Available from: 2015-09-17 Created: 2015-09-17 Last updated: 2016-01-20Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf