hkr.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Bacterial profile and burden of periodontal infection in subjects with a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome.
Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0992-2362
Department of Medicine, Central Hospital, Kristianstad, Sweden.
Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland & University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3620-5978
2006 (English)In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, Vol. 77, no 7, 1110-1119 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Periodontitis has been identified as a potential risk factor in cardiovascular diseases. It is possible that the stimulation of host responses to oral infections may result in vascular damage and the inducement of blood clotting. The aim of this study was to assess the role of periodontal infection and bacterial burden as an explanatory variable to the activation of the inflammatory process leading to acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

METHODS: A total of 161 consecutive surviving cases admitted with a diagnosis of ACS and 161 control subjects, matched with cases according to their gender, socioeconomic level, and smoking status, were studied. Serum white blood cell (WBC) counts, high- and low-density lipoprotein (HDL/LDL) levels, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsC-rp) levels, and clinical periodontal routine parameters were studied. The subgingival pathogens were assayed by the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method.

RESULTS: Total oral bacterial load was higher in the subjects with ACS (mean difference: 17.4x10(5); SD: 10.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.2 to 17.4; P<0.001), and significant for 26 of 40 species including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, and Treponema denticola. Serum WBC counts, hsC-rp levels, Streptococcus intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis, were explanatory factors to acute coronary syndrome status (Nagelkerke r2=0.49).

CONCLUSION: The oral bacterial load of S. intermedius, S. sanguis, Streptococcus anginosus, T. forsythensis, T. denticola, and P. gingivalis may be concomitant risk factors in the development of ACS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 77, no 7, 1110-1119 p.
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-12266DOI: 10.1902/jop.2006.050336ISI: 000241879200003PubMedID: 16805672OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-12266DiVA: diva2:729878
Available from: 2014-06-26 Created: 2014-06-26 Last updated: 2014-09-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Renvert, StefanOhlsson, OlaPersson, G. Rutger
By organisation
Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap
In the same journal
Journal of Periodontology
Dentistry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 120 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf