hkr.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Colored pain drawings: preliminary observations in a neurosurgical practice
Masferrer Neurosurgical, Colorado Springs.
Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix.
Section of Restorative Neurology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University Hospital, Lund. (Forskningsmiljön PRO-CARE)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2174-372X
2003 (English)In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 7, no 3, 213-217 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Black and white pain drawings were introduced as a proposed means to identify patients, presenting with low back pain, who demonstrated functional overlay upon neurological testing. The use of color may enhance the usefulness of such pain drawings, but has not been described for adult patients.

AIMS: To retrospectively explore the use of colored pain drawings in patients with neck, low back, or radicular pain.

METHODS: Patients with neck, low back, or radicular pain referred to a community-based neurosurgical practice for evaluation during 1 year (n=359) depicted their pain on anatomical drawings using colored pencils representing different pain characteristics. Patients with abnormal (n=55) and normal (n=54) pain drawings were selected for this study. Use of medications, findings on physical examination, radiographic findings, activity levels, Waddell signs, and pending litigation were recorded and compared between patients with normal and abnormal pain drawings, as assessed according to the Ransford penalty point system.

RESULTS: Patients whose colored pain drawings were abnormal, demonstrated a greater use of medications, more non-focal clinical findings, Waddell signs, impaired activity levels, involvement in pending litigation, and significantly fewer pathological radiographic findings than patients with normal pain drawings.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings agree with previous observations using black and white pain drawings, indicating that colored pain drawings are no less useful than the black and white approach. Further research is necessary to examine the psychometric properties and clinical usefulness of colored pain drawings to predict outcomes and/or determine treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 7, no 3, 213-217 p.
Keyword [en]
Colors, Low back pain, Pain assessment, Pain drawings, Waddell signs
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-12256DOI: 10.1016/S1090-3801(02)00113-1PubMedID: 12725843OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-12256DiVA: diva2:729824
Available from: 2014-06-26 Created: 2014-06-26 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Hagell, Peter

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hagell, Peter
In the same journal
European Journal of Pain
Neurology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 23 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf